Here are the likely contenders on Biden's vice president shortlist

Here are the likely contenders on Biden's vice president shortlistWhile Joe Biden has committed to selecting a female running mate, few further details are confirmed. Here's a look at five women in the picture.


Coronavirus infections are rising as states reopen, potentially signaling a second wave

Coronavirus infections are rising as states reopen, potentially signaling a second waveTwenty states reported an increase in new infections during the week ending May 24, up from 13 states the week before.


The Chinese CDC now says the coronavirus didn't jump to people at the Wuhan wet market — instead, it was the site of a super-spreader event

The Chinese CDC now says the coronavirus didn't jump to people at the Wuhan wet market — instead, it was the site of a super-spreader eventThe origin of the new coronavirus still isn't known. But according to the Chinese CDC, it isn't the wet market in Wuhan.


Iran Guards warn US after receiving new combat vessels

Iran Guards warn US after receiving new combat vesselsIran's Revolutionary Guards on Thursday warned the United States against its naval presence in the Gulf as they received 110 new combat vessels. "We announce today that wherever the Americans are, we are right next to them, and they will feel our presence even more in the near future," the Guards' navy chief Rear Admiral Alireza Tangsiri said during a ceremony in southern Iran. Iran and the United States have appeared to be on the brink of an all-out confrontation twice in the past year.


Mexican drug lord pleads poverty in bid to escape arrest

Mexican drug lord pleads poverty in bid to escape arrestDrug lord Rafael Caro Quintero, a notorious underworld figure who is on the FBI’s most wanted list for the murder of a federal agent over three decades ago, said in a legal appeal that he has no money, is too old to work and has no pension. The odd plea was filed Tuesday by Caro Quintero's lawyer seeking an injunction against his arrest or extradition to the United States for the kidnapping and murder of DEA Special Agent Enrique Camarena in Mexico in 1985. The U.S. government says Caro Quintero and his family remain in the drug trade.


Huawei CFO Meng loses key court fight against extradition to United States

Huawei CFO Meng loses key court fight against extradition to United StatesHuawei Technologies Co's Chief Financial Officer Meng Wanzhou was dealt a setback by a Canadian court on Wednesday as she tries to avoid extradition to the United States to face bank fraud charges, dashing hopes for an end to her 18-month house arrest in Vancouver. The ruling, which could further deteriorate relations between Ottawa and Beijing, elicited immediate strong reaction from China's embassy in Canada, which said Canada is "accomplice to United States efforts to bring down Huawei and Chinese high-tech companies."


Five UK mercenaries offered $150,000 each to fly helicopters for Gen Haftar in Libya, say UN

Five UK mercenaries offered $150,000 each to fly helicopters for Gen Haftar in Libya, say UNFive British mercenaries involved in an operation to fly assault helicopters for Libya’s renegade General Khalifa Haftar were offered bounties of up to $150,000 each for their role in the daring plot which went awry. The men, comprised of former Royal Marines and RAF personnel, were among 20 foreign mercenaries who traveled to Libya last June in an operation to pilot assault helicopters and speed boats to intercept Turkish ships ferrying weapons to Haftar’s opponents – the UN-backed government in Tripoli. A source with knowledge of the secret UN report which revealed the plot told The Daily Telegraph that the men involved were believed on sums of “$30,000 to $50,000 a month, or $20,000 to $40,000 per month depending on whether you were pilot or aircrewman”. “It was a three-month contract”. The Telegraph can reveal that the UN investigation concluded that the operation was led by Steven Lodge, a former South African Air Force officer who also served in the British military. Mr. Lodge, who now resides in Scotland, is a director of Umbra Aviation, a South-Africa based company that has recently supplied helicopters to the Government of Mozambique, where the country is battling a jihadist insurgency in its restive north. Speaking to The Telegraph over the phone, Mr. Lodge flatly denied the chronicle of events detailed in the UN report. “All the info is incorrect - the whole facts behind the whole thing,” he said.


'It's a Sad Result.' Mixed Feelings in Hong Kong Over U.S. Announcement on City's Autonomy

'It's a Sad Result.' Mixed Feelings in Hong Kong Over U.S. Announcement on City's AutonomyOne leading pro-democracy figure thanked Washington, others said the move was bad news for Hong Kong people


UConn student wanted in connection to 2 deaths is captured

UConn student wanted in connection to 2 deaths is captured"Peter Manfredonia has been found & is in custody" after a nearly weeklong manhunt, officials said Wednesday.


Amy Klobuchar didn't prosecute officer at center of George Floyd's death after previous conduct complaints

Amy Klobuchar didn't prosecute officer at center of George Floyd's death after previous conduct complaintsGeorge Floyd's death in police custody is renewing criticism of Sen. Amy Klobuchar's (D-Minn.) prosecutorial record.Before she became a senator and a top contender for former Vice President Joe Biden's vice presidential spot, Klobuchar spent eight years as the Hennepin County attorney, in charge of prosecution for Minneapolis. And while in that position, Klobuchar declined to prosecute multiple police officers cited for excessive force, including the officer who kneeled on Floyd's neck as he protested, The Guardian reports.Ex-Minneapolis police officer Derick Chauvin saw at least 10 conduct complaints during his 19-year tenure before he was fired Tuesday, according to a database that documents complaints against police. In particular, he was involved in the shooting death of a man who had stabbed other people before attacking police, as well as some other undisclosed complaints. Klobuchar did not prosecute Chauvin for the first death, and he was later placed on leave when he and other officers shot and wounded a Native American man in 2011.As The Washington Post noted in March, Klobuchar "declined to bring charges in more than two dozen cases in which people were killed in encounters with police" as Hennepin County attorney. Instead, she "aggressively prosecuted smaller offenses" that "have been criticized for their disproportionate effect on poor and minority communities," the Post continues. And as Klobuchar undergoes vetting to become a possible vice presidential candidate, that track record is being scrutinized and criticized once again.More stories from theweek.com Minneapolis official calls for naming 'disease' of racism a public health issue after George Floyd death Trump retweets video declaring 'the only good Democrat is a dead Democrat' Trump signs executive order seeking regulations on social media


Levi’s Is Taking 50% off These Best-Selling Jeans Right Now
One of Trump's favorite pollsters shows his approval plummeting

One of Trump's favorite pollsters shows his approval plummetingPresident Trump’s approval rating has plummeted since late February, according to the Rasmussen daily tracking poll, which the president frequently cited during his first three years in office.


CDC changes its 'confusing' guidelines on coronavirus and surfaces. Here's what we know.

CDC changes its 'confusing' guidelines on coronavirus and surfaces. Here's what we know.This new CDC update may quell some major concerns about how COVID-19 is transmitted, but plenty of questions still remain. Here's what to know.


Warrants describe nightmarish child abuse case in Tennessee

Warrants describe nightmarish child abuse case in TennesseeArrest warrants in a Tennessee couple's abuse case describe a hellish existence for four children in their legal custody, a nightmare that finally ended after a little boy was spotted walking alone along a Roane County road. Michael Anthony Gray Sr., 63, and his wife, Shirley Ann Gray, 60, were arrested Monday on charges of aggravated child abuse, especially aggravated kidnapping, aggravated child neglect and abuse of a corpse, authorities said. The oldest had been locked in the partially flooded, unfinished basement for stealing food shortly after the family moved to the home in June 2016, authorities said, "and had no contact with anyone outside the basement, only given small amounts of food, being white bread and some water,” the warrants state.


So-called honor killing of teen girl sparks outcry in Iran

So-called honor killing of teen girl sparks outcry in IranThe so-called honor killing of a 14-year-old Iranian girl by her dad, who reportedly beheaded her as she slept, has sparked a nationwide outcry.


Iran outraged by 'honour killing' of 14-year-old girl Romina Ashrafi

Iran outraged by 'honour killing' of 14-year-old girl Romina AshrafiThe killing of an Iranian teen by her father after she eloped with an older man sparked outrage on Wednesday, with local media denouncing "institutionalised violence" in "patriarchal" Iran. Iranian media covered the apparent "honour" crime extensively, with Ebtekar newspaper leading its front page with the headline "Unsafe father's house". According to local media, Romina Ashrafi was killed in her sleep on May 21 by her father, who decapitated her in the family home in Talesh in northern Gilan province. The reports said her father had refused her permission to marry a man fifteen years her senior, spurring her to run away, but she was returned home after her father reported her. The legal marriage age in Iran is 13 for women. Iranian media reported that after authorities detained the teenager, she told a judge she feared for her life if she was returned to home. But what most outraged public opinion was the lenient punishment the father is likely to face, Ebtekar wrote. The newspaper notes that Iran's normal "eye for an eye" retributive justice does not apply to fathers who kill their children. Accordingly, he is likely to face three to 10 years in prison, a sentence that could be reduced further, the newspaper wrote, denouncing the "institutionalised violence" of Iran's "patriarchal culture". With the farsi hashtag Romina_Ashrafi focusing outrage on Twitter, President Hassan Rouhani "expressed his regrets" in a cabinet meeting on Wednesday, pleading for the speedy passing of several anti-violence bills, his office said. On Twitter, Vice President for Women and Family Affairs, Masoumeh Ebtekar, said a bill on the protection of young people was in the "final phase" of validation by Iran's Guardian Council. The council, which vets legislation to ensure compliance with Iran's constitution and Islamic sharia law, has thrice previously called for changes to the law after it was passed by lawmakers, Ebtekar newspaper wrote. The publication fears that if the council sends back the bill, it will be buried by Iran's new parliament, which held its first session Wednesday and is dominated by conservatives and hardliners opposed to Rouhani.


Tyson Foods will shut U.S. pork plant as more workers catch COVID-19

Tyson Foods will shut U.S. pork plant as more workers catch COVID-19Tyson Foods Inc said on Thursday it will temporarily close an Iowa pork plant due to the coronavirus pandemic, a month after U.S. President Donald Trump ordered slaughterhouses to stay open to protect the country's food supply. Meat processors like Tyson Foods, WH Group's <0288.HK> Smithfield Foods and JBS USA temporarily closed about 20 slaughterhouses last month as workers fell ill with the new coronavirus, leading to shortages of certain products in grocery stores. An Iowa state official said 555 employees at Tyson's Storm Lake plant tested positive for the virus, about 22% of the workforce.


ICC allows former I.Coast president Gbagbo to leave Belgium

ICC allows former I.Coast president Gbagbo to leave BelgiumThe International Criminal Court on Thursday said former Ivory Coast President Laurent Gbagbo can leave Belgium under certain conditions following his acquittal last year over post-electoral violence that killed 3,000 people. Gbagbo and his deputy Charles Ble Goude were both cleared of crimes against humanity a year ago, eight years after the former West African strongman's arrest and transfer to the Hague-based court. Belgium agreed to host Gbagbo, 73, after he was released in February last year under strict conditions including that he would return to court for a prosecution appeal against his acquittal.


Senate Democrats take on GOP court-packing in blistering new report

Senate Democrats take on GOP court-packing in blistering new reportThe senators pointed to conservative activist Leonard Leo as the driving force behind the many of the president's appointments.


Pakistani villager urges India to return 'spy' pigeon

Pakistani villager urges India to return 'spy' pigeonThe owner of a pigeon "arrested" by India for spying says his bird was freed for Eid and is innocent.


Biden points out he was warning about pandemic unpreparedness in October while Trump tweeted about iPhones

Biden points out he was warning about pandemic unpreparedness in October while Trump tweeted about iPhonesFormer Vice President Joe Biden has a humble brag he'd like to share.In October 2019, months before the coronavirus outbreak began, Biden tweeted a warning to the United States, saying "We are not prepared for a pandemic." Biden then called out President Trump for rolling back measures the Obama administration took, likely referring to Trump's 2018 disbandment of the team directly responsible for handling a pandemic response.As Biden's Twitter account conveniently pointed out Thursday, while Biden was urging caution, Trump was tweeting about iPhones. Specifically, the president took issue with the button-less feature in iPhone models released in 2017 onward.> Two tweets from the same day in October. pic.twitter.com/rsSslLCsTW> > — Joe Biden (@JoeBiden) May 28, 2020In fairness to Trump, this was months before the first COVID-19 case had even been reported, and just one month after the newest iPhone model had been released. And we do miss those buttons.More stories from theweek.com Amy Klobuchar didn't prosecute officer at center of George Floyd's death after previous conduct complaints Minnesota governor activates National Guard as protests continue over death of George Floyd Trump retweets video declaring 'the only good Democrat is a dead Democrat'


Pharma chiefs see coronavirus vaccine by year-end, but challenges 'daunting'

Pharma chiefs see coronavirus vaccine by year-end, but challenges 'daunting'Pharmaceutical company executives said Thursday that one or several COVID-19 vaccines could begin rolling out before 2021, but warned the challenges would be "daunting" as it was estimated that 15 billion doses would be needed to halt the pandemic. Well over 100 labs around the world are scrambling to come up with a vaccine against the novel coronavirus, including 10 that have made it to the clinical trial stage. "The hope of many people is that we will have a vaccine, hopefully several, by the end of this year," Pascal Soriot, head of AstraZeneca, told a virtual briefing.


Minneapolis Man: Cop Who Kneeled on George Floyd ‘Tried to Kill Me’ in 2008

Minneapolis Man: Cop Who Kneeled on George Floyd ‘Tried to Kill Me’ in 2008Ira Latrell Toles didn’t immediately recognize Minneapolis cop Derek Chauvin in the now-viral video of him holding his knee on George Floyd’s neck as the handcuffed black man repeatedly told him he couldn’t breathe.But when news outlets identified the officers involved, Toles, 33, realized the man responsible for Floyd’s death was the same police officer who barged into his home and beat him up in the bathroom before shooting him in the stomach 12 years earlier while responding to a domestic violence call. “The officer that killed that guy might be the one that shot me,” Toles texted his sister on Tuesday night, according to messages shared with The Daily Beast. “They said his last name and I think it was him.”“It’s him,” his sister instantly replied.On Tuesday, Chauvin was one of four officers fired for his involvement in Floyd’s death, which has sparked protests across the country and calls for a federal hate-crime investigation. Local outlets reported that Chauvin was the officer who knelt on Floyd’s neck for several minutes—as the 46-year-old pleaded, “I’m about to die.” Floyd had no pulse when he was finally put into an ambulance.‘Burn It Down. Let Them Pay’: Deadly Chaos Erupts in Minneapolis as Fires Rage Over Police ViolenceMinneapolis Mayor Jacob Frey on Wednesday called for Hennepin County Attorney Mike Freeman to arrest and charge Chauvin with Floyd’s death. “Why is the man who killed George Floyd not in jail? If you had done it, or I had done it, we would be behind bars right now,” Frey said in a news conference.Toles believes that Floyd’s horrific death could have been prevented if Chauvin was properly punished for his violent arrest in May 2008. He said that while he pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor charge—and still suffers pain from the bullet hole in his lower stomach—Chauvin continued his career at the Minneapolis Police Department with nothing more than a slap on the wrist.“If he was reprimanded when he shot me, George Floyd would still be alive,” the IT professional said. Authorities said that just before 2 a.m on May 24, 2008, officers responded to a domestic violence call at an apartment complex on Columbus Ave South. The 911 operator could hear a woman yelling for somebody to stop hitting her, local media reported at the time. Toles, who was then 21, admits that the mother of his child called the cops on him that night, but he was surprised when several officers showed up without announcing themselves. “When I saw that he breached the front door, I ran in the bathroom,” Toles told The Daily Beast. “Then [Chauvin] starts kicking in that door. I was in the bathroom with a cigarette and no lighter.”The 33-year-old said that Chauvin broke into the bathroom and started to hit him without warning. Toles said he returned blows to the officer because “my natural reaction to someone hitting me is to stop them from hitting me.” “All I could do is assume it was the police because they didn’t announce themselves or ever give me a command,” he said. “I didn’t know what to think when he started hitting me. I swear he was hitting me with the gun.”According to local news reports, Chauvin shot and wounded Toles after he allegedly reached for an officer’s gun. Toles said he doesn’t remember being shot—just “being walked through the apartment until I collapsed in the main entrance where I was left to bleed until the paramedics came.” “I remember my baby mother screaming and crying also,” he added.Toles was taken to Hennepin County Medical Center, where he said he stayed for about three days. There, he learned Chauvin had shot him at such close range that the bullet went through his groin and came out his left butt cheek before hitting the bathroom wall. The wound, he said, left a hole that “never really closed” and is so large he can still stick a finger inside. Once he was released from the hospital, Toles said he was taken directly to court, where he was charged with two felony counts of obstructing legal process or arrest and a misdemeanor count of domestic assault. “I would assume my reaction would be to try to stop him from hitting me. If his first reaction was hitting me in the face that means I can’t see and I’m too disoriented to first locate his gun and then try to take it from him and for what?” Toles said. “To turn a misdemeanor disorderly situation into a felony situation that could have resulted in me dying? He tried to kill me in that bathroom.” Toles said he only spent a day or two in jail—where he was denied pain pills—for the charges before he was released. Three months later, he said he pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor charge as part of a deal.Chauvin and the other officers involved were put on paid administrative leave pending an investigation into the shooting—a standard procedure for the Minneapolis Police Department—but were later placed back into the field. “I knew he would do something again,” Toles said. “I wish we had smartphones back then.”The Minneapolis Police Department did not immediately respond to The Daily Beast’s request for comment. Chauvin, 44, is one of four officers who responded to a suspected “forgery in process” on Monday night—along with Thomas Lane, J Alexander Kueng, and Tou Thao.In the gut-wrenching, 10-minute video recorded by a bystander, Chauvin is seen pressing his knee on Floyd’s neck while Thao stands guard, trying to keep upset bystanders at bay. “Please, please, please, I can’t breathe. Please, man,” Floyd says in the footage that does not show the beginning of the arrest. “I’m about to die,” he says. A Minneapolis Fire Department report said Floyd did not have a pulse when he was loaded into an ambulance. He was pronounced dead at a nearby hospital shortly after in what police described as a “medical incident.”“We are looking and demanding that these officers be arrested and charged with the murder of George Floyd,” Ben Crump, a civil rights attorney representing the 46-year-old’s family, told The Daily Beast on Thursday. “My hope is that there will be effective and courageous leadership that will speak to the value of George Floyd’s life as an example to the world that black lives matter. It’s time for a change in Minneapolis.”Chauvin, who joined the force in 2001, has also been involved in several other police-involved shootings throughout his career. According to Communities United Against Police Brutality, 10 complaints have been filed against the now-former police officer—but Chauvin only ever received two verbal reprimands.In 2006, Chauvin was involved in the fatal shooting of 42-year-old Wayne Reyes, who allegedly stabbed two people before reportedly turning a gun on police. Chauvin was among six officers to respond to the stabbing. A year prior, Chauvin and another officer were also chasing a car that then hit and killed three people, according to Communities United Against Police Brutality.In 2011, the officer was also one of five officers placed on a standard three-day leave after the non-fatal shooting of a Native American man. The officers returned to work after the department determined that they had acted “appropriately.”The city’s Civilian Review Authority, which lists complaints prior to September 2012, shows five more complaints against Chauvin, which were closed without discipline. A prisoner at a Minnesota correctional facility sued Chauvin and seven other officers for “alleged violations of his federal constitutional rights” in 2006, although the case was dismissed and the details were not clear.Toles said that while he has not protested himself, he believes this horrific incident is a watershed moment for the Minneapolis Police Department—an agency that he says has become the butt of a joke in the black community.“We joke about it in the black community but we know that a white person calling the cops on us is gonna go in their favor,” he said. The 33-year-old added that while he believes Floyd's death will finally bring change and reform that is necessary for Minneapolis, it’s outraged residents who will ensure that justice is finally seen. He added that while he never filed a complaint in 2008, he is now looking to sue the Minneapolis Police Department for the violent incident. “We’ve all reached our tipping point. Water boils at 212 degrees,” he said. “We’re at 600.”Read more at The Daily Beast.Got a tip? Send it to The Daily Beast hereGet our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


Cockpit voice recorder of crashed Pakistani plane recovered

Cockpit voice recorder of crashed Pakistani plane recoveredThe cockpit voice recorder of the Pakistani airliner that crashed last week was found on Thursday, six days after the passenger plane went down in a crowded neighborhood near the airport in the city of Karachi, killing 97 people on board. The other part of the black box, a flight data recorder, was recovered within hours of the crash. There were only two survivors of the Airbus A320 crash, which was carrying 91 passengers and eight crew members.


Outrage in Iran over gruesome 'honour killing' of teenage girl

Outrage in Iran over gruesome 'honour killing' of teenage girlIran’s president has called for so-called honour killings to be outlawed following the gruesome murder of a teenage girl, allegedly by her father, for running away from home with an older man. Romina Ashrafi, 14, was allegedly beheaded by her father as punishment for fleeing her home in Talesh, near Tehran, with a 29-year-old man. The couple were detained and Romina was handed back to her family as her father appeared to have forgiven her, according to the state news agency IRNA. But on May 21, the girl’s father attacked her while she was sleeping and cut off her head with a sickle, according to a local news website called Gilkhabar. The father has since been arrested, as well as the man Romina eloped with according to local media reports. Under Iranian law, young girls can marry from 13 although most women get married in their early 20s according to the Associated Press. If convicted, the girl’s father would face a prison sentence of ten years. Iran’s penal code currently reduces the penalties for fathers, or other family members, who carry out honour killings on their relatives. Romina’s death has shocked Iran and prompted Hassan Rouhani, the president, to order his Cabinet to speed up legislation against so-called honour killings.


This Neo-Futuristic Home Found Its Inspiration in the British Countryside
Venezuela's Maduro vows to raise gasoline price as Iranian tanker nears

Venezuela's Maduro vows to raise gasoline price as Iranian tanker nearsVenezuelan President Nicolas Maduro on Wednesday pledged to begin charging citizens for gasoline, as the fourth cargo of a five-tanker flotilla bringing fuel from Iran approached the South American nation's exclusive economic zone. Iran is providing the country with up to 1.53 million barrels of gasoline and components to help it ease an acute scarcity that has forced Venezuelans to wait in hours-long lines at service stations or pay steep prices on the black market. With the arrival of the gasoline, Maduro said he would end the policy of providing fuel effectively for free after more than two decades of frozen pump prices.


Russia slams 'dangerous' US foreign policy moves

Russia slams 'dangerous' US foreign policy movesRussia said on Thursday the United States was acting in a dngerous and unpredictable way, after Washington withdrew from a key military treaty and moved to ramp up pressure on Iran. Foreign ministry spokeswoman Maria Zakharova made the comments after Washington announced it would end sanctions waivers for nations that remain in a nuclear accord signed with Iran.


Rohingya refugee crisis: 'The bodies were thrown out of the boat'

Rohingya refugee crisis: 'The bodies were thrown out of the boat'Khadiza Begum, a Rohingya refugee, left Myanmar to escape violence but found more horror at sea.


Republican Sen. Chuck Grassley: Trump has failed to justify ouster of watchdogs, fueling political speculation

Republican Sen. Chuck Grassley: Trump has failed to justify ouster of watchdogs, fueling political speculationThe unusual rebuke from Iowa Republican Sen. Chuck Grassley comes amid scrutiny of Trump's decision to fire the State Department's inspector general.


WH press secretary: Trump says he’s feeling ‘absolutely great’ after taking hydroxychloroquine

WH press secretary: Trump says he’s feeling ‘absolutely great’ after taking hydroxychloroquineAt a press briefing on Thursday, White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany told reporters President Trump said he’s feeling “absolutely great” after completing his treatment with the malaria drug hydroxychloroquine as a preventive measure against the coronavirus. In April, the FDA cautioned against using the drug to treat COVID-19 outside of a hospital setting or clinical trial.


Double murder suspect arrested after multistate manhunt

Double murder suspect arrested after multistate manhuntThe manhunt for the 23-year-old college senior had spanned Connecticut, New Jersey, Pennsylvania and Maryland.


NASA and SpaceX's launch was postponed, but at least we got to see their wildly corny spacesuits

NASA and SpaceX's launch was postponed, but at least we got to see their wildly corny spacesuitsThe much-heralded joint launch between NASA and Elon Musk's SpaceX was postponed on Wednesday due to light rain in Florida. It was a disappointing anticlimax for the first manned space launch from American soil since 2011 — all systems were "go" just an hour before astronauts Robert Behnken and Douglas Hurley were scheduled for 4:33 p.m. liftoff — but there was a silver lining to the clouds above Cape Canaveral: the world got to see, for the first time, NASA and SpaceX's alarmingly cheesy spacesuits, which looked something like man-sized Mentos dispensers topped off with garden galoshes.While many on Twitter hailed the gear as looking "soo cool" and "so f—ing dope," the correct reaction came from one commenter who said the suits "make [the astronauts] look like stunt extras in a low budget space movie." Whether or not Behnken and Hurley find themselves menaced by rubbery Venus ghouls in some misbegotten Roger Corman epic, the suits might lead to an even graver danger: not being able to extract their heads from the two-sizes-too small helmets that Musk looks to have grabbed from his local Spirit Halloween.If the spacemen are fortunate enough to somehow wrench the helmets from their skulls, NASA and SpaceX will give it another go on either Saturday or Sunday — probably not enough time to raid NASA's old closets for some real spacesuits.More stories from theweek.com Amy Klobuchar didn't prosecute officer at center of George Floyd's death after previous conduct complaints Minnesota governor activates National Guard as protests continue over death of George Floyd Trump retweets video declaring 'the only good Democrat is a dead Democrat'


Gang of 26 arrested for allegedly smuggling people from Vietnam to Europe in investigation prompted by Essex lorry deaths

Gang of 26 arrested for allegedly smuggling people from Vietnam to Europe in investigation prompted by Essex lorry deathsA gang of 26 suspected people smugglers have been arrested in France and Belgium in an investigation prompted by the deaths of 39 Vietnamese migrants found in the back of a lorry in Essex last year. The early morning raids took place in Paris and Brussels, with 13 people detained in each country. In Belgium, 11 Vietnamese and two Moroccans were held, while in France, authorities said the suspects were “mostly Vietnamese and French”. The suspects are allegedly part of an organised crime group that smuggles refugees from Asia, particularly from Vietnam, and that likely has transported up to several dozen people every day for several months, Europol said in a statement. “Prompted by the discovery of 39 deceased Vietnamese nationals inside a refrigerated trailer in Essex in the United Kingdom in October 2019, a joint investigation team (JIT) was created between Belgium, Ireland, France, the United Kingdom, Eurojust and Europol,” Europol said.


'100,000 people died, Joe, and all you did was try to help your friend the president': CNBC's Andrew Ross Sorkin unloaded on fellow anchor Joe Kernen over the severity of coronavirus

'100,000 people died, Joe, and all you did was try to help your friend the president': CNBC's Andrew Ross Sorkin unloaded on fellow anchor Joe Kernen over the severity of coronavirusThe exchange between the CNBC hosts lasted around a minute as they lobbed accusations at each other.


Failed Maduro coup leader flew on pro-govt magnate's plane

Failed Maduro coup leader flew on pro-govt magnate's planeIt was mid-January and Jordan Goudreau was itching to get going on a secret plan to raid Venezuela and arrest President Nicolás Maduro when the former special forces commando flew to the city of Barranquilla in Colombia to meet with his would-be partner in arms. To get there, Goudreau and two former Green Beret buddies relied on some unusual help: a chartered flight out of Miami’s Opa Locka executive airport on a plane owned by a Venezuelan businessman so close to the government of Hugo Chávez that he spent almost 4 years in a U.S. prison for trying to cover up clandestine cash payments to its allies. The owner of the Venezuela-registered Cessna Citation II with yellow and blue lines, identified with the tail number YV-3231, was Franklin Durán, according to three people familiar with the businessman’s movements who spoke on the condition of anonymity for fear of retaliation.


Turkey's Erdogan says many facilities to reopen on June 1

Turkey's Erdogan says many facilities to reopen on June 1Turkey will lift restrictions on intercity travel and allow restaurants, cafes, parks and sports facilities to reopen from June 1 as it eases restrictions imposed to curb the coronavirus outbreak, President Tayyip Erdogan said on Thursday. Restrictions will remain in place on the movements of those aged over 65 and under 18. The virus has killed nearly 4,500 people in Turkey, with more than 160,000 infections.


Study: Death Rates for Drivers Vary by Car Size

Study: Death Rates for Drivers Vary by Car SizeWhen it comes to vehicle crashes, size and weight matter a great deal. That’s the conclusion of a comprehensive, three-year study into how drivers fared in their vehicles over time by the Insuran...


Coronavirus: How the pandemic in US compares with rest of world

Coronavirus: How the pandemic in US compares with rest of worldMore than 100,000 people have died and the country is now slowly reopening amid fears of new spikes.


China passes draft Hong Kong security law, sparking fear and anger

China passes draft Hong Kong security law, sparking fear and anger"Hong Kong, in many ways, has become the new Berlin: the new meeting point of a big argument of big disagreement between two major powers."


Bills You Don't Have to Pay During the Coronavirus Pandemic
Protester who hung effigy of Kentucky Gov. Andy Beshear fired from job at car dealership

Protester who hung effigy of Kentucky Gov. Andy Beshear fired from job at car dealershipTerry Bush, president of the Kentucky 3 Percenters group, only hoisted the effigy, his wife Patsy said Wednesday morning.


George Floyd death: AOC says politicians scared of ‘political power of police’ as she and Ilhan Omar call for officer to be charged with murder

George Floyd death: AOC says politicians scared of ‘political power of police’ as she and Ilhan Omar call for officer to be charged with murderDemocratic congresswomen Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Ilhan Omar have called for the police officer who knelt on George Floyd‘s neck to be charged with murder, as the former claims politicians are scared of “the political power of police.”On Monday, four police officers in Minneapolis were fired after footage emerged of one of them kneeling on the neck of Mr Floyd, a black man, who repeatedly shouted that he couldn’t breathe.


Britain shuts embassy in North Korea after extreme lockdown

Britain shuts embassy in North Korea after extreme lockdownBritain has closed its embassy in the North Korean capital of Pyongyang and ordered its staff to leave the country. The surprise closure is linked to coronavirus-related restrictions in place since earlier this year, which the Foreign Office said had left it unable to "rotate our staff and sustain the operation of the Embassy". It follows a similar evacuation of a number of other diplomats and foreign residents from the North Korean capital in March. A number of sources told the US news website NK News on Wednesday that the British diplomats left North Korea by land, crossing the DPRK’s border with China earlier on Wednesday. Flights out of the country remain grounded. Hundreds of foreign residents remain in Pyongyang, including diplomats from the Swedish and Russian embassies and a small number of aid workers, though absent representatives from Germany, Switzerland, France, and Italy. There are currently no British residents in the country. Resident diplomats had previously raised their concerns about the severity of the DPRK authorities’ coronavirus-prevention rules, which saw the country close its borders and place them under effective house arrest for over a month earlier in the year.


Tesla slashes prices to boost demand

Tesla slashes prices to boost demandTesla Inc. has cut prices of its electric vehicles by as much as 6% in North America following a decline in auto demand in the region during weeks of lockdown that have now started to ease.


English court to weigh recognition of Maduro, Guaido in Venezuela gold case

English court to weigh recognition of Maduro, Guaido in Venezuela gold caseAn English court on Thursday said it would need to decide which of Venezuela's dueling political factions to recognize before ruling on President Nicolas Maduro's request for the Bank of England to hand over gold the country has in its vaults. Venezuela for decades stored gold that makes up part of its central bank reserves in the vaults of foreign financial institutions including the Bank of England, which provides gold custodian services to developing countries. The bank since 2018 has refused to transfer the funds to Maduro's government, which Britain does not recognize.


Ford made its police SUV heat itself up to more than 133 degrees to kill the coronavirus

Ford made its police SUV heat itself up to more than 133 degrees to kill the coronavirusFord worked with Ohio State and police departments to develop the tech. Ford has a longstanding relationship with law enforcement.


A pharmacist known as 'the Mask Man' has been charged with hoarding $200,000 worth of N95 masks and price-gouging customers

A pharmacist known as 'the Mask Man' has been charged with hoarding $200,000 worth of N95 masks and price-gouging customersThe DOJ said the pharmacist, 66-year-old Richard Schirripa, sold $2,690 of masks to an undercover officer and said he felt "like a drug dealer."


Navy admiral submits results of probe on virus-infected ship

Navy admiral submits results of probe on virus-infected shipThe Navy's top admiral on Wednesday received the results of an internal investigation into the spread of the coronavirus aboard the USS Theodore Roosevelt and the firing of the aircraft carrier's skipper in April. The report is not expected to be made public until decisions are made about potentially restoring Capt. Brett Crozier to command of the Roosevelt or disciplining other officers. It was submitted Wednesday to Adm. Mike Gilday, the chief of naval operations.


Asian shares mixed after Wall Street rally; Hong Kong lower

Asian shares mixed after Wall Street rally; Hong Kong lowerAsian stocks were mixed after an upbeat open on Thursday, as investors pinned their hopes on an economic rebound from the coronavirus crisis. Shares rose in Tokyo, Sydney and Shanghai but dropped in Hong Kong, where tensions are flaring over Beijing’s effort to exert more control over the former British colony. The most recent developments are another thorn in a relationship already testy over China's handling of the early stages of the coronavirus outbreaks and over longstanding trade and other antagonisms.


Here are the likely contenders on Biden's vice president shortlist

Here are the likely contenders on Biden's vice president shortlistWhile Joe Biden has committed to selecting a female running mate, few further details are confirmed. Here's a look at five women in the picture.


Coronavirus infections are rising as states reopen, potentially signaling a second wave

Coronavirus infections are rising as states reopen, potentially signaling a second waveTwenty states reported an increase in new infections during the week ending May 24, up from 13 states the week before.


The Chinese CDC now says the coronavirus didn't jump to people at the Wuhan wet market — instead, it was the site of a super-spreader event

The Chinese CDC now says the coronavirus didn't jump to people at the Wuhan wet market — instead, it was the site of a super-spreader eventThe origin of the new coronavirus still isn't known. But according to the Chinese CDC, it isn't the wet market in Wuhan.


Iran Guards warn US after receiving new combat vessels

Iran Guards warn US after receiving new combat vesselsIran's Revolutionary Guards on Thursday warned the United States against its naval presence in the Gulf as they received 110 new combat vessels. "We announce today that wherever the Americans are, we are right next to them, and they will feel our presence even more in the near future," the Guards' navy chief Rear Admiral Alireza Tangsiri said during a ceremony in southern Iran. Iran and the United States have appeared to be on the brink of an all-out confrontation twice in the past year.


Mexican drug lord pleads poverty in bid to escape arrest

Mexican drug lord pleads poverty in bid to escape arrestDrug lord Rafael Caro Quintero, a notorious underworld figure who is on the FBI’s most wanted list for the murder of a federal agent over three decades ago, said in a legal appeal that he has no money, is too old to work and has no pension. The odd plea was filed Tuesday by Caro Quintero's lawyer seeking an injunction against his arrest or extradition to the United States for the kidnapping and murder of DEA Special Agent Enrique Camarena in Mexico in 1985. The U.S. government says Caro Quintero and his family remain in the drug trade.


Huawei CFO Meng loses key court fight against extradition to United States

Huawei CFO Meng loses key court fight against extradition to United StatesHuawei Technologies Co's Chief Financial Officer Meng Wanzhou was dealt a setback by a Canadian court on Wednesday as she tries to avoid extradition to the United States to face bank fraud charges, dashing hopes for an end to her 18-month house arrest in Vancouver. The ruling, which could further deteriorate relations between Ottawa and Beijing, elicited immediate strong reaction from China's embassy in Canada, which said Canada is "accomplice to United States efforts to bring down Huawei and Chinese high-tech companies."


Five UK mercenaries offered $150,000 each to fly helicopters for Gen Haftar in Libya, say UN

Five UK mercenaries offered $150,000 each to fly helicopters for Gen Haftar in Libya, say UNFive British mercenaries involved in an operation to fly assault helicopters for Libya’s renegade General Khalifa Haftar were offered bounties of up to $150,000 each for their role in the daring plot which went awry. The men, comprised of former Royal Marines and RAF personnel, were among 20 foreign mercenaries who traveled to Libya last June in an operation to pilot assault helicopters and speed boats to intercept Turkish ships ferrying weapons to Haftar’s opponents – the UN-backed government in Tripoli. A source with knowledge of the secret UN report which revealed the plot told The Daily Telegraph that the men involved were believed on sums of “$30,000 to $50,000 a month, or $20,000 to $40,000 per month depending on whether you were pilot or aircrewman”. “It was a three-month contract”. The Telegraph can reveal that the UN investigation concluded that the operation was led by Steven Lodge, a former South African Air Force officer who also served in the British military. Mr. Lodge, who now resides in Scotland, is a director of Umbra Aviation, a South-Africa based company that has recently supplied helicopters to the Government of Mozambique, where the country is battling a jihadist insurgency in its restive north. Speaking to The Telegraph over the phone, Mr. Lodge flatly denied the chronicle of events detailed in the UN report. “All the info is incorrect - the whole facts behind the whole thing,” he said.


'It's a Sad Result.' Mixed Feelings in Hong Kong Over U.S. Announcement on City's Autonomy

'It's a Sad Result.' Mixed Feelings in Hong Kong Over U.S. Announcement on City's AutonomyOne leading pro-democracy figure thanked Washington, others said the move was bad news for Hong Kong people


UConn student wanted in connection to 2 deaths is captured

UConn student wanted in connection to 2 deaths is captured"Peter Manfredonia has been found & is in custody" after a nearly weeklong manhunt, officials said Wednesday.


Amy Klobuchar didn't prosecute officer at center of George Floyd's death after previous conduct complaints

Amy Klobuchar didn't prosecute officer at center of George Floyd's death after previous conduct complaintsGeorge Floyd's death in police custody is renewing criticism of Sen. Amy Klobuchar's (D-Minn.) prosecutorial record.Before she became a senator and a top contender for former Vice President Joe Biden's vice presidential spot, Klobuchar spent eight years as the Hennepin County attorney, in charge of prosecution for Minneapolis. And while in that position, Klobuchar declined to prosecute multiple police officers cited for excessive force, including the officer who kneeled on Floyd's neck as he protested, The Guardian reports.Ex-Minneapolis police officer Derick Chauvin saw at least 10 conduct complaints during his 19-year tenure before he was fired Tuesday, according to a database that documents complaints against police. In particular, he was involved in the shooting death of a man who had stabbed other people before attacking police, as well as some other undisclosed complaints. Klobuchar did not prosecute Chauvin for the first death, and he was later placed on leave when he and other officers shot and wounded a Native American man in 2011.As The Washington Post noted in March, Klobuchar "declined to bring charges in more than two dozen cases in which people were killed in encounters with police" as Hennepin County attorney. Instead, she "aggressively prosecuted smaller offenses" that "have been criticized for their disproportionate effect on poor and minority communities," the Post continues. And as Klobuchar undergoes vetting to become a possible vice presidential candidate, that track record is being scrutinized and criticized once again.More stories from theweek.com Minneapolis official calls for naming 'disease' of racism a public health issue after George Floyd death Trump retweets video declaring 'the only good Democrat is a dead Democrat' Trump signs executive order seeking regulations on social media


Levi’s Is Taking 50% off These Best-Selling Jeans Right Now
One of Trump's favorite pollsters shows his approval plummeting

One of Trump's favorite pollsters shows his approval plummetingPresident Trump’s approval rating has plummeted since late February, according to the Rasmussen daily tracking poll, which the president frequently cited during his first three years in office.


CDC changes its 'confusing' guidelines on coronavirus and surfaces. Here's what we know.

CDC changes its 'confusing' guidelines on coronavirus and surfaces. Here's what we know.This new CDC update may quell some major concerns about how COVID-19 is transmitted, but plenty of questions still remain. Here's what to know.


Warrants describe nightmarish child abuse case in Tennessee

Warrants describe nightmarish child abuse case in TennesseeArrest warrants in a Tennessee couple's abuse case describe a hellish existence for four children in their legal custody, a nightmare that finally ended after a little boy was spotted walking alone along a Roane County road. Michael Anthony Gray Sr., 63, and his wife, Shirley Ann Gray, 60, were arrested Monday on charges of aggravated child abuse, especially aggravated kidnapping, aggravated child neglect and abuse of a corpse, authorities said. The oldest had been locked in the partially flooded, unfinished basement for stealing food shortly after the family moved to the home in June 2016, authorities said, "and had no contact with anyone outside the basement, only given small amounts of food, being white bread and some water,” the warrants state.


So-called honor killing of teen girl sparks outcry in Iran

So-called honor killing of teen girl sparks outcry in IranThe so-called honor killing of a 14-year-old Iranian girl by her dad, who reportedly beheaded her as she slept, has sparked a nationwide outcry.


Iran outraged by 'honour killing' of 14-year-old girl Romina Ashrafi

Iran outraged by 'honour killing' of 14-year-old girl Romina AshrafiThe killing of an Iranian teen by her father after she eloped with an older man sparked outrage on Wednesday, with local media denouncing "institutionalised violence" in "patriarchal" Iran. Iranian media covered the apparent "honour" crime extensively, with Ebtekar newspaper leading its front page with the headline "Unsafe father's house". According to local media, Romina Ashrafi was killed in her sleep on May 21 by her father, who decapitated her in the family home in Talesh in northern Gilan province. The reports said her father had refused her permission to marry a man fifteen years her senior, spurring her to run away, but she was returned home after her father reported her. The legal marriage age in Iran is 13 for women. Iranian media reported that after authorities detained the teenager, she told a judge she feared for her life if she was returned to home. But what most outraged public opinion was the lenient punishment the father is likely to face, Ebtekar wrote. The newspaper notes that Iran's normal "eye for an eye" retributive justice does not apply to fathers who kill their children. Accordingly, he is likely to face three to 10 years in prison, a sentence that could be reduced further, the newspaper wrote, denouncing the "institutionalised violence" of Iran's "patriarchal culture". With the farsi hashtag Romina_Ashrafi focusing outrage on Twitter, President Hassan Rouhani "expressed his regrets" in a cabinet meeting on Wednesday, pleading for the speedy passing of several anti-violence bills, his office said. On Twitter, Vice President for Women and Family Affairs, Masoumeh Ebtekar, said a bill on the protection of young people was in the "final phase" of validation by Iran's Guardian Council. The council, which vets legislation to ensure compliance with Iran's constitution and Islamic sharia law, has thrice previously called for changes to the law after it was passed by lawmakers, Ebtekar newspaper wrote. The publication fears that if the council sends back the bill, it will be buried by Iran's new parliament, which held its first session Wednesday and is dominated by conservatives and hardliners opposed to Rouhani.


Tyson Foods will shut U.S. pork plant as more workers catch COVID-19

Tyson Foods will shut U.S. pork plant as more workers catch COVID-19Tyson Foods Inc said on Thursday it will temporarily close an Iowa pork plant due to the coronavirus pandemic, a month after U.S. President Donald Trump ordered slaughterhouses to stay open to protect the country's food supply. Meat processors like Tyson Foods, WH Group's <0288.HK> Smithfield Foods and JBS USA temporarily closed about 20 slaughterhouses last month as workers fell ill with the new coronavirus, leading to shortages of certain products in grocery stores. An Iowa state official said 555 employees at Tyson's Storm Lake plant tested positive for the virus, about 22% of the workforce.


ICC allows former I.Coast president Gbagbo to leave Belgium

ICC allows former I.Coast president Gbagbo to leave BelgiumThe International Criminal Court on Thursday said former Ivory Coast President Laurent Gbagbo can leave Belgium under certain conditions following his acquittal last year over post-electoral violence that killed 3,000 people. Gbagbo and his deputy Charles Ble Goude were both cleared of crimes against humanity a year ago, eight years after the former West African strongman's arrest and transfer to the Hague-based court. Belgium agreed to host Gbagbo, 73, after he was released in February last year under strict conditions including that he would return to court for a prosecution appeal against his acquittal.


Senate Democrats take on GOP court-packing in blistering new report

Senate Democrats take on GOP court-packing in blistering new reportThe senators pointed to conservative activist Leonard Leo as the driving force behind the many of the president's appointments.


Pakistani villager urges India to return 'spy' pigeon

Pakistani villager urges India to return 'spy' pigeonThe owner of a pigeon "arrested" by India for spying says his bird was freed for Eid and is innocent.


Biden points out he was warning about pandemic unpreparedness in October while Trump tweeted about iPhones

Biden points out he was warning about pandemic unpreparedness in October while Trump tweeted about iPhonesFormer Vice President Joe Biden has a humble brag he'd like to share.In October 2019, months before the coronavirus outbreak began, Biden tweeted a warning to the United States, saying "We are not prepared for a pandemic." Biden then called out President Trump for rolling back measures the Obama administration took, likely referring to Trump's 2018 disbandment of the team directly responsible for handling a pandemic response.As Biden's Twitter account conveniently pointed out Thursday, while Biden was urging caution, Trump was tweeting about iPhones. Specifically, the president took issue with the button-less feature in iPhone models released in 2017 onward.> Two tweets from the same day in October. pic.twitter.com/rsSslLCsTW> > — Joe Biden (@JoeBiden) May 28, 2020In fairness to Trump, this was months before the first COVID-19 case had even been reported, and just one month after the newest iPhone model had been released. And we do miss those buttons.More stories from theweek.com Amy Klobuchar didn't prosecute officer at center of George Floyd's death after previous conduct complaints Minnesota governor activates National Guard as protests continue over death of George Floyd Trump retweets video declaring 'the only good Democrat is a dead Democrat'


Pharma chiefs see coronavirus vaccine by year-end, but challenges 'daunting'

Pharma chiefs see coronavirus vaccine by year-end, but challenges 'daunting'Pharmaceutical company executives said Thursday that one or several COVID-19 vaccines could begin rolling out before 2021, but warned the challenges would be "daunting" as it was estimated that 15 billion doses would be needed to halt the pandemic. Well over 100 labs around the world are scrambling to come up with a vaccine against the novel coronavirus, including 10 that have made it to the clinical trial stage. "The hope of many people is that we will have a vaccine, hopefully several, by the end of this year," Pascal Soriot, head of AstraZeneca, told a virtual briefing.


Minneapolis Man: Cop Who Kneeled on George Floyd ‘Tried to Kill Me’ in 2008

Minneapolis Man: Cop Who Kneeled on George Floyd ‘Tried to Kill Me’ in 2008Ira Latrell Toles didn’t immediately recognize Minneapolis cop Derek Chauvin in the now-viral video of him holding his knee on George Floyd’s neck as the handcuffed black man repeatedly told him he couldn’t breathe.But when news outlets identified the officers involved, Toles, 33, realized the man responsible for Floyd’s death was the same police officer who barged into his home and beat him up in the bathroom before shooting him in the stomach 12 years earlier while responding to a domestic violence call. “The officer that killed that guy might be the one that shot me,” Toles texted his sister on Tuesday night, according to messages shared with The Daily Beast. “They said his last name and I think it was him.”“It’s him,” his sister instantly replied.On Tuesday, Chauvin was one of four officers fired for his involvement in Floyd’s death, which has sparked protests across the country and calls for a federal hate-crime investigation. Local outlets reported that Chauvin was the officer who knelt on Floyd’s neck for several minutes—as the 46-year-old pleaded, “I’m about to die.” Floyd had no pulse when he was finally put into an ambulance.‘Burn It Down. Let Them Pay’: Deadly Chaos Erupts in Minneapolis as Fires Rage Over Police ViolenceMinneapolis Mayor Jacob Frey on Wednesday called for Hennepin County Attorney Mike Freeman to arrest and charge Chauvin with Floyd’s death. “Why is the man who killed George Floyd not in jail? If you had done it, or I had done it, we would be behind bars right now,” Frey said in a news conference.Toles believes that Floyd’s horrific death could have been prevented if Chauvin was properly punished for his violent arrest in May 2008. He said that while he pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor charge—and still suffers pain from the bullet hole in his lower stomach—Chauvin continued his career at the Minneapolis Police Department with nothing more than a slap on the wrist.“If he was reprimanded when he shot me, George Floyd would still be alive,” the IT professional said. Authorities said that just before 2 a.m on May 24, 2008, officers responded to a domestic violence call at an apartment complex on Columbus Ave South. The 911 operator could hear a woman yelling for somebody to stop hitting her, local media reported at the time. Toles, who was then 21, admits that the mother of his child called the cops on him that night, but he was surprised when several officers showed up without announcing themselves. “When I saw that he breached the front door, I ran in the bathroom,” Toles told The Daily Beast. “Then [Chauvin] starts kicking in that door. I was in the bathroom with a cigarette and no lighter.”The 33-year-old said that Chauvin broke into the bathroom and started to hit him without warning. Toles said he returned blows to the officer because “my natural reaction to someone hitting me is to stop them from hitting me.” “All I could do is assume it was the police because they didn’t announce themselves or ever give me a command,” he said. “I didn’t know what to think when he started hitting me. I swear he was hitting me with the gun.”According to local news reports, Chauvin shot and wounded Toles after he allegedly reached for an officer’s gun. Toles said he doesn’t remember being shot—just “being walked through the apartment until I collapsed in the main entrance where I was left to bleed until the paramedics came.” “I remember my baby mother screaming and crying also,” he added.Toles was taken to Hennepin County Medical Center, where he said he stayed for about three days. There, he learned Chauvin had shot him at such close range that the bullet went through his groin and came out his left butt cheek before hitting the bathroom wall. The wound, he said, left a hole that “never really closed” and is so large he can still stick a finger inside. Once he was released from the hospital, Toles said he was taken directly to court, where he was charged with two felony counts of obstructing legal process or arrest and a misdemeanor count of domestic assault. “I would assume my reaction would be to try to stop him from hitting me. If his first reaction was hitting me in the face that means I can’t see and I’m too disoriented to first locate his gun and then try to take it from him and for what?” Toles said. “To turn a misdemeanor disorderly situation into a felony situation that could have resulted in me dying? He tried to kill me in that bathroom.” Toles said he only spent a day or two in jail—where he was denied pain pills—for the charges before he was released. Three months later, he said he pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor charge as part of a deal.Chauvin and the other officers involved were put on paid administrative leave pending an investigation into the shooting—a standard procedure for the Minneapolis Police Department—but were later placed back into the field. “I knew he would do something again,” Toles said. “I wish we had smartphones back then.”The Minneapolis Police Department did not immediately respond to The Daily Beast’s request for comment. Chauvin, 44, is one of four officers who responded to a suspected “forgery in process” on Monday night—along with Thomas Lane, J Alexander Kueng, and Tou Thao.In the gut-wrenching, 10-minute video recorded by a bystander, Chauvin is seen pressing his knee on Floyd’s neck while Thao stands guard, trying to keep upset bystanders at bay. “Please, please, please, I can’t breathe. Please, man,” Floyd says in the footage that does not show the beginning of the arrest. “I’m about to die,” he says. A Minneapolis Fire Department report said Floyd did not have a pulse when he was loaded into an ambulance. He was pronounced dead at a nearby hospital shortly after in what police described as a “medical incident.”“We are looking and demanding that these officers be arrested and charged with the murder of George Floyd,” Ben Crump, a civil rights attorney representing the 46-year-old’s family, told The Daily Beast on Thursday. “My hope is that there will be effective and courageous leadership that will speak to the value of George Floyd’s life as an example to the world that black lives matter. It’s time for a change in Minneapolis.”Chauvin, who joined the force in 2001, has also been involved in several other police-involved shootings throughout his career. According to Communities United Against Police Brutality, 10 complaints have been filed against the now-former police officer—but Chauvin only ever received two verbal reprimands.In 2006, Chauvin was involved in the fatal shooting of 42-year-old Wayne Reyes, who allegedly stabbed two people before reportedly turning a gun on police. Chauvin was among six officers to respond to the stabbing. A year prior, Chauvin and another officer were also chasing a car that then hit and killed three people, according to Communities United Against Police Brutality.In 2011, the officer was also one of five officers placed on a standard three-day leave after the non-fatal shooting of a Native American man. The officers returned to work after the department determined that they had acted “appropriately.”The city’s Civilian Review Authority, which lists complaints prior to September 2012, shows five more complaints against Chauvin, which were closed without discipline. A prisoner at a Minnesota correctional facility sued Chauvin and seven other officers for “alleged violations of his federal constitutional rights” in 2006, although the case was dismissed and the details were not clear.Toles said that while he has not protested himself, he believes this horrific incident is a watershed moment for the Minneapolis Police Department—an agency that he says has become the butt of a joke in the black community.“We joke about it in the black community but we know that a white person calling the cops on us is gonna go in their favor,” he said. The 33-year-old added that while he believes Floyd's death will finally bring change and reform that is necessary for Minneapolis, it’s outraged residents who will ensure that justice is finally seen. He added that while he never filed a complaint in 2008, he is now looking to sue the Minneapolis Police Department for the violent incident. “We’ve all reached our tipping point. Water boils at 212 degrees,” he said. “We’re at 600.”Read more at The Daily Beast.Got a tip? Send it to The Daily Beast hereGet our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


Cockpit voice recorder of crashed Pakistani plane recovered

Cockpit voice recorder of crashed Pakistani plane recoveredThe cockpit voice recorder of the Pakistani airliner that crashed last week was found on Thursday, six days after the passenger plane went down in a crowded neighborhood near the airport in the city of Karachi, killing 97 people on board. The other part of the black box, a flight data recorder, was recovered within hours of the crash. There were only two survivors of the Airbus A320 crash, which was carrying 91 passengers and eight crew members.


Outrage in Iran over gruesome 'honour killing' of teenage girl

Outrage in Iran over gruesome 'honour killing' of teenage girlIran’s president has called for so-called honour killings to be outlawed following the gruesome murder of a teenage girl, allegedly by her father, for running away from home with an older man. Romina Ashrafi, 14, was allegedly beheaded by her father as punishment for fleeing her home in Talesh, near Tehran, with a 29-year-old man. The couple were detained and Romina was handed back to her family as her father appeared to have forgiven her, according to the state news agency IRNA. But on May 21, the girl’s father attacked her while she was sleeping and cut off her head with a sickle, according to a local news website called Gilkhabar. The father has since been arrested, as well as the man Romina eloped with according to local media reports. Under Iranian law, young girls can marry from 13 although most women get married in their early 20s according to the Associated Press. If convicted, the girl’s father would face a prison sentence of ten years. Iran’s penal code currently reduces the penalties for fathers, or other family members, who carry out honour killings on their relatives. Romina’s death has shocked Iran and prompted Hassan Rouhani, the president, to order his Cabinet to speed up legislation against so-called honour killings.


This Neo-Futuristic Home Found Its Inspiration in the British Countryside
Venezuela's Maduro vows to raise gasoline price as Iranian tanker nears

Venezuela's Maduro vows to raise gasoline price as Iranian tanker nearsVenezuelan President Nicolas Maduro on Wednesday pledged to begin charging citizens for gasoline, as the fourth cargo of a five-tanker flotilla bringing fuel from Iran approached the South American nation's exclusive economic zone. Iran is providing the country with up to 1.53 million barrels of gasoline and components to help it ease an acute scarcity that has forced Venezuelans to wait in hours-long lines at service stations or pay steep prices on the black market. With the arrival of the gasoline, Maduro said he would end the policy of providing fuel effectively for free after more than two decades of frozen pump prices.


Russia slams 'dangerous' US foreign policy moves

Russia slams 'dangerous' US foreign policy movesRussia said on Thursday the United States was acting in a dngerous and unpredictable way, after Washington withdrew from a key military treaty and moved to ramp up pressure on Iran. Foreign ministry spokeswoman Maria Zakharova made the comments after Washington announced it would end sanctions waivers for nations that remain in a nuclear accord signed with Iran.


Rohingya refugee crisis: 'The bodies were thrown out of the boat'

Rohingya refugee crisis: 'The bodies were thrown out of the boat'Khadiza Begum, a Rohingya refugee, left Myanmar to escape violence but found more horror at sea.


Republican Sen. Chuck Grassley: Trump has failed to justify ouster of watchdogs, fueling political speculation

Republican Sen. Chuck Grassley: Trump has failed to justify ouster of watchdogs, fueling political speculationThe unusual rebuke from Iowa Republican Sen. Chuck Grassley comes amid scrutiny of Trump's decision to fire the State Department's inspector general.


WH press secretary: Trump says he’s feeling ‘absolutely great’ after taking hydroxychloroquine

WH press secretary: Trump says he’s feeling ‘absolutely great’ after taking hydroxychloroquineAt a press briefing on Thursday, White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany told reporters President Trump said he’s feeling “absolutely great” after completing his treatment with the malaria drug hydroxychloroquine as a preventive measure against the coronavirus. In April, the FDA cautioned against using the drug to treat COVID-19 outside of a hospital setting or clinical trial.


Double murder suspect arrested after multistate manhunt

Double murder suspect arrested after multistate manhuntThe manhunt for the 23-year-old college senior had spanned Connecticut, New Jersey, Pennsylvania and Maryland.


NASA and SpaceX's launch was postponed, but at least we got to see their wildly corny spacesuits

NASA and SpaceX's launch was postponed, but at least we got to see their wildly corny spacesuitsThe much-heralded joint launch between NASA and Elon Musk's SpaceX was postponed on Wednesday due to light rain in Florida. It was a disappointing anticlimax for the first manned space launch from American soil since 2011 — all systems were "go" just an hour before astronauts Robert Behnken and Douglas Hurley were scheduled for 4:33 p.m. liftoff — but there was a silver lining to the clouds above Cape Canaveral: the world got to see, for the first time, NASA and SpaceX's alarmingly cheesy spacesuits, which looked something like man-sized Mentos dispensers topped off with garden galoshes.While many on Twitter hailed the gear as looking "soo cool" and "so f—ing dope," the correct reaction came from one commenter who said the suits "make [the astronauts] look like stunt extras in a low budget space movie." Whether or not Behnken and Hurley find themselves menaced by rubbery Venus ghouls in some misbegotten Roger Corman epic, the suits might lead to an even graver danger: not being able to extract their heads from the two-sizes-too small helmets that Musk looks to have grabbed from his local Spirit Halloween.If the spacemen are fortunate enough to somehow wrench the helmets from their skulls, NASA and SpaceX will give it another go on either Saturday or Sunday — probably not enough time to raid NASA's old closets for some real spacesuits.More stories from theweek.com Amy Klobuchar didn't prosecute officer at center of George Floyd's death after previous conduct complaints Minnesota governor activates National Guard as protests continue over death of George Floyd Trump retweets video declaring 'the only good Democrat is a dead Democrat'


Gang of 26 arrested for allegedly smuggling people from Vietnam to Europe in investigation prompted by Essex lorry deaths

Gang of 26 arrested for allegedly smuggling people from Vietnam to Europe in investigation prompted by Essex lorry deathsA gang of 26 suspected people smugglers have been arrested in France and Belgium in an investigation prompted by the deaths of 39 Vietnamese migrants found in the back of a lorry in Essex last year. The early morning raids took place in Paris and Brussels, with 13 people detained in each country. In Belgium, 11 Vietnamese and two Moroccans were held, while in France, authorities said the suspects were “mostly Vietnamese and French”. The suspects are allegedly part of an organised crime group that smuggles refugees from Asia, particularly from Vietnam, and that likely has transported up to several dozen people every day for several months, Europol said in a statement. “Prompted by the discovery of 39 deceased Vietnamese nationals inside a refrigerated trailer in Essex in the United Kingdom in October 2019, a joint investigation team (JIT) was created between Belgium, Ireland, France, the United Kingdom, Eurojust and Europol,” Europol said.


'100,000 people died, Joe, and all you did was try to help your friend the president': CNBC's Andrew Ross Sorkin unloaded on fellow anchor Joe Kernen over the severity of coronavirus

'100,000 people died, Joe, and all you did was try to help your friend the president': CNBC's Andrew Ross Sorkin unloaded on fellow anchor Joe Kernen over the severity of coronavirusThe exchange between the CNBC hosts lasted around a minute as they lobbed accusations at each other.


Failed Maduro coup leader flew on pro-govt magnate's plane

Failed Maduro coup leader flew on pro-govt magnate's planeIt was mid-January and Jordan Goudreau was itching to get going on a secret plan to raid Venezuela and arrest President Nicolás Maduro when the former special forces commando flew to the city of Barranquilla in Colombia to meet with his would-be partner in arms. To get there, Goudreau and two former Green Beret buddies relied on some unusual help: a chartered flight out of Miami’s Opa Locka executive airport on a plane owned by a Venezuelan businessman so close to the government of Hugo Chávez that he spent almost 4 years in a U.S. prison for trying to cover up clandestine cash payments to its allies. The owner of the Venezuela-registered Cessna Citation II with yellow and blue lines, identified with the tail number YV-3231, was Franklin Durán, according to three people familiar with the businessman’s movements who spoke on the condition of anonymity for fear of retaliation.


Turkey's Erdogan says many facilities to reopen on June 1

Turkey's Erdogan says many facilities to reopen on June 1Turkey will lift restrictions on intercity travel and allow restaurants, cafes, parks and sports facilities to reopen from June 1 as it eases restrictions imposed to curb the coronavirus outbreak, President Tayyip Erdogan said on Thursday. Restrictions will remain in place on the movements of those aged over 65 and under 18. The virus has killed nearly 4,500 people in Turkey, with more than 160,000 infections.


Study: Death Rates for Drivers Vary by Car Size

Study: Death Rates for Drivers Vary by Car SizeWhen it comes to vehicle crashes, size and weight matter a great deal. That’s the conclusion of a comprehensive, three-year study into how drivers fared in their vehicles over time by the Insuran...


Coronavirus: How the pandemic in US compares with rest of world

Coronavirus: How the pandemic in US compares with rest of worldMore than 100,000 people have died and the country is now slowly reopening amid fears of new spikes.


China passes draft Hong Kong security law, sparking fear and anger

China passes draft Hong Kong security law, sparking fear and anger"Hong Kong, in many ways, has become the new Berlin: the new meeting point of a big argument of big disagreement between two major powers."


Bills You Don't Have to Pay During the Coronavirus Pandemic
Protester who hung effigy of Kentucky Gov. Andy Beshear fired from job at car dealership

Protester who hung effigy of Kentucky Gov. Andy Beshear fired from job at car dealershipTerry Bush, president of the Kentucky 3 Percenters group, only hoisted the effigy, his wife Patsy said Wednesday morning.


George Floyd death: AOC says politicians scared of ‘political power of police’ as she and Ilhan Omar call for officer to be charged with murder

George Floyd death: AOC says politicians scared of ‘political power of police’ as she and Ilhan Omar call for officer to be charged with murderDemocratic congresswomen Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Ilhan Omar have called for the police officer who knelt on George Floyd‘s neck to be charged with murder, as the former claims politicians are scared of “the political power of police.”On Monday, four police officers in Minneapolis were fired after footage emerged of one of them kneeling on the neck of Mr Floyd, a black man, who repeatedly shouted that he couldn’t breathe.


Britain shuts embassy in North Korea after extreme lockdown

Britain shuts embassy in North Korea after extreme lockdownBritain has closed its embassy in the North Korean capital of Pyongyang and ordered its staff to leave the country. The surprise closure is linked to coronavirus-related restrictions in place since earlier this year, which the Foreign Office said had left it unable to "rotate our staff and sustain the operation of the Embassy". It follows a similar evacuation of a number of other diplomats and foreign residents from the North Korean capital in March. A number of sources told the US news website NK News on Wednesday that the British diplomats left North Korea by land, crossing the DPRK’s border with China earlier on Wednesday. Flights out of the country remain grounded. Hundreds of foreign residents remain in Pyongyang, including diplomats from the Swedish and Russian embassies and a small number of aid workers, though absent representatives from Germany, Switzerland, France, and Italy. There are currently no British residents in the country. Resident diplomats had previously raised their concerns about the severity of the DPRK authorities’ coronavirus-prevention rules, which saw the country close its borders and place them under effective house arrest for over a month earlier in the year.


Tesla slashes prices to boost demand

Tesla slashes prices to boost demandTesla Inc. has cut prices of its electric vehicles by as much as 6% in North America following a decline in auto demand in the region during weeks of lockdown that have now started to ease.


English court to weigh recognition of Maduro, Guaido in Venezuela gold case

English court to weigh recognition of Maduro, Guaido in Venezuela gold caseAn English court on Thursday said it would need to decide which of Venezuela's dueling political factions to recognize before ruling on President Nicolas Maduro's request for the Bank of England to hand over gold the country has in its vaults. Venezuela for decades stored gold that makes up part of its central bank reserves in the vaults of foreign financial institutions including the Bank of England, which provides gold custodian services to developing countries. The bank since 2018 has refused to transfer the funds to Maduro's government, which Britain does not recognize.


Ford made its police SUV heat itself up to more than 133 degrees to kill the coronavirus

Ford made its police SUV heat itself up to more than 133 degrees to kill the coronavirusFord worked with Ohio State and police departments to develop the tech. Ford has a longstanding relationship with law enforcement.


A pharmacist known as 'the Mask Man' has been charged with hoarding $200,000 worth of N95 masks and price-gouging customers

A pharmacist known as 'the Mask Man' has been charged with hoarding $200,000 worth of N95 masks and price-gouging customersThe DOJ said the pharmacist, 66-year-old Richard Schirripa, sold $2,690 of masks to an undercover officer and said he felt "like a drug dealer."


Navy admiral submits results of probe on virus-infected ship

Navy admiral submits results of probe on virus-infected shipThe Navy's top admiral on Wednesday received the results of an internal investigation into the spread of the coronavirus aboard the USS Theodore Roosevelt and the firing of the aircraft carrier's skipper in April. The report is not expected to be made public until decisions are made about potentially restoring Capt. Brett Crozier to command of the Roosevelt or disciplining other officers. It was submitted Wednesday to Adm. Mike Gilday, the chief of naval operations.


Asian shares mixed after Wall Street rally; Hong Kong lower

Asian shares mixed after Wall Street rally; Hong Kong lowerAsian stocks were mixed after an upbeat open on Thursday, as investors pinned their hopes on an economic rebound from the coronavirus crisis. Shares rose in Tokyo, Sydney and Shanghai but dropped in Hong Kong, where tensions are flaring over Beijing’s effort to exert more control over the former British colony. The most recent developments are another thorn in a relationship already testy over China's handling of the early stages of the coronavirus outbreaks and over longstanding trade and other antagonisms.


Here are the likely contenders on Biden's vice president shortlist

Here are the likely contenders on Biden's vice president shortlistWhile Joe Biden has committed to selecting a female running mate, few further details are confirmed. Here's a look at five women in the picture.


Coronavirus infections are rising as states reopen, potentially signaling a second wave

Coronavirus infections are rising as states reopen, potentially signaling a second waveTwenty states reported an increase in new infections during the week ending May 24, up from 13 states the week before.


The Chinese CDC now says the coronavirus didn't jump to people at the Wuhan wet market — instead, it was the site of a super-spreader event

The Chinese CDC now says the coronavirus didn't jump to people at the Wuhan wet market — instead, it was the site of a super-spreader eventThe origin of the new coronavirus still isn't known. But according to the Chinese CDC, it isn't the wet market in Wuhan.


Iran Guards warn US after receiving new combat vessels

Iran Guards warn US after receiving new combat vesselsIran's Revolutionary Guards on Thursday warned the United States against its naval presence in the Gulf as they received 110 new combat vessels. "We announce today that wherever the Americans are, we are right next to them, and they will feel our presence even more in the near future," the Guards' navy chief Rear Admiral Alireza Tangsiri said during a ceremony in southern Iran. Iran and the United States have appeared to be on the brink of an all-out confrontation twice in the past year.


Mexican drug lord pleads poverty in bid to escape arrest

Mexican drug lord pleads poverty in bid to escape arrestDrug lord Rafael Caro Quintero, a notorious underworld figure who is on the FBI’s most wanted list for the murder of a federal agent over three decades ago, said in a legal appeal that he has no money, is too old to work and has no pension. The odd plea was filed Tuesday by Caro Quintero's lawyer seeking an injunction against his arrest or extradition to the United States for the kidnapping and murder of DEA Special Agent Enrique Camarena in Mexico in 1985. The U.S. government says Caro Quintero and his family remain in the drug trade.


Huawei CFO Meng loses key court fight against extradition to United States

Huawei CFO Meng loses key court fight against extradition to United StatesHuawei Technologies Co's Chief Financial Officer Meng Wanzhou was dealt a setback by a Canadian court on Wednesday as she tries to avoid extradition to the United States to face bank fraud charges, dashing hopes for an end to her 18-month house arrest in Vancouver. The ruling, which could further deteriorate relations between Ottawa and Beijing, elicited immediate strong reaction from China's embassy in Canada, which said Canada is "accomplice to United States efforts to bring down Huawei and Chinese high-tech companies."


Five UK mercenaries offered $150,000 each to fly helicopters for Gen Haftar in Libya, say UN

Five UK mercenaries offered $150,000 each to fly helicopters for Gen Haftar in Libya, say UNFive British mercenaries involved in an operation to fly assault helicopters for Libya’s renegade General Khalifa Haftar were offered bounties of up to $150,000 each for their role in the daring plot which went awry. The men, comprised of former Royal Marines and RAF personnel, were among 20 foreign mercenaries who traveled to Libya last June in an operation to pilot assault helicopters and speed boats to intercept Turkish ships ferrying weapons to Haftar’s opponents – the UN-backed government in Tripoli. A source with knowledge of the secret UN report which revealed the plot told The Daily Telegraph that the men involved were believed on sums of “$30,000 to $50,000 a month, or $20,000 to $40,000 per month depending on whether you were pilot or aircrewman”. “It was a three-month contract”. The Telegraph can reveal that the UN investigation concluded that the operation was led by Steven Lodge, a former South African Air Force officer who also served in the British military. Mr. Lodge, who now resides in Scotland, is a director of Umbra Aviation, a South-Africa based company that has recently supplied helicopters to the Government of Mozambique, where the country is battling a jihadist insurgency in its restive north. Speaking to The Telegraph over the phone, Mr. Lodge flatly denied the chronicle of events detailed in the UN report. “All the info is incorrect - the whole facts behind the whole thing,” he said.


'It's a Sad Result.' Mixed Feelings in Hong Kong Over U.S. Announcement on City's Autonomy

'It's a Sad Result.' Mixed Feelings in Hong Kong Over U.S. Announcement on City's AutonomyOne leading pro-democracy figure thanked Washington, others said the move was bad news for Hong Kong people


UConn student wanted in connection to 2 deaths is captured

UConn student wanted in connection to 2 deaths is captured"Peter Manfredonia has been found & is in custody" after a nearly weeklong manhunt, officials said Wednesday.


Amy Klobuchar didn't prosecute officer at center of George Floyd's death after previous conduct complaints

Amy Klobuchar didn't prosecute officer at center of George Floyd's death after previous conduct complaintsGeorge Floyd's death in police custody is renewing criticism of Sen. Amy Klobuchar's (D-Minn.) prosecutorial record.Before she became a senator and a top contender for former Vice President Joe Biden's vice presidential spot, Klobuchar spent eight years as the Hennepin County attorney, in charge of prosecution for Minneapolis. And while in that position, Klobuchar declined to prosecute multiple police officers cited for excessive force, including the officer who kneeled on Floyd's neck as he protested, The Guardian reports.Ex-Minneapolis police officer Derick Chauvin saw at least 10 conduct complaints during his 19-year tenure before he was fired Tuesday, according to a database that documents complaints against police. In particular, he was involved in the shooting death of a man who had stabbed other people before attacking police, as well as some other undisclosed complaints. Klobuchar did not prosecute Chauvin for the first death, and he was later placed on leave when he and other officers shot and wounded a Native American man in 2011.As The Washington Post noted in March, Klobuchar "declined to bring charges in more than two dozen cases in which people were killed in encounters with police" as Hennepin County attorney. Instead, she "aggressively prosecuted smaller offenses" that "have been criticized for their disproportionate effect on poor and minority communities," the Post continues. And as Klobuchar undergoes vetting to become a possible vice presidential candidate, that track record is being scrutinized and criticized once again.More stories from theweek.com Minneapolis official calls for naming 'disease' of racism a public health issue after George Floyd death Trump retweets video declaring 'the only good Democrat is a dead Democrat' Trump signs executive order seeking regulations on social media


Levi’s Is Taking 50% off These Best-Selling Jeans Right Now
One of Trump's favorite pollsters shows his approval plummeting

One of Trump's favorite pollsters shows his approval plummetingPresident Trump’s approval rating has plummeted since late February, according to the Rasmussen daily tracking poll, which the president frequently cited during his first three years in office.


CDC changes its 'confusing' guidelines on coronavirus and surfaces. Here's what we know.

CDC changes its 'confusing' guidelines on coronavirus and surfaces. Here's what we know.This new CDC update may quell some major concerns about how COVID-19 is transmitted, but plenty of questions still remain. Here's what to know.


Warrants describe nightmarish child abuse case in Tennessee

Warrants describe nightmarish child abuse case in TennesseeArrest warrants in a Tennessee couple's abuse case describe a hellish existence for four children in their legal custody, a nightmare that finally ended after a little boy was spotted walking alone along a Roane County road. Michael Anthony Gray Sr., 63, and his wife, Shirley Ann Gray, 60, were arrested Monday on charges of aggravated child abuse, especially aggravated kidnapping, aggravated child neglect and abuse of a corpse, authorities said. The oldest had been locked in the partially flooded, unfinished basement for stealing food shortly after the family moved to the home in June 2016, authorities said, "and had no contact with anyone outside the basement, only given small amounts of food, being white bread and some water,” the warrants state.


So-called honor killing of teen girl sparks outcry in Iran

So-called honor killing of teen girl sparks outcry in IranThe so-called honor killing of a 14-year-old Iranian girl by her dad, who reportedly beheaded her as she slept, has sparked a nationwide outcry.


Iran outraged by 'honour killing' of 14-year-old girl Romina Ashrafi

Iran outraged by 'honour killing' of 14-year-old girl Romina AshrafiThe killing of an Iranian teen by her father after she eloped with an older man sparked outrage on Wednesday, with local media denouncing "institutionalised violence" in "patriarchal" Iran. Iranian media covered the apparent "honour" crime extensively, with Ebtekar newspaper leading its front page with the headline "Unsafe father's house". According to local media, Romina Ashrafi was killed in her sleep on May 21 by her father, who decapitated her in the family home in Talesh in northern Gilan province. The reports said her father had refused her permission to marry a man fifteen years her senior, spurring her to run away, but she was returned home after her father reported her. The legal marriage age in Iran is 13 for women. Iranian media reported that after authorities detained the teenager, she told a judge she feared for her life if she was returned to home. But what most outraged public opinion was the lenient punishment the father is likely to face, Ebtekar wrote. The newspaper notes that Iran's normal "eye for an eye" retributive justice does not apply to fathers who kill their children. Accordingly, he is likely to face three to 10 years in prison, a sentence that could be reduced further, the newspaper wrote, denouncing the "institutionalised violence" of Iran's "patriarchal culture". With the farsi hashtag Romina_Ashrafi focusing outrage on Twitter, President Hassan Rouhani "expressed his regrets" in a cabinet meeting on Wednesday, pleading for the speedy passing of several anti-violence bills, his office said. On Twitter, Vice President for Women and Family Affairs, Masoumeh Ebtekar, said a bill on the protection of young people was in the "final phase" of validation by Iran's Guardian Council. The council, which vets legislation to ensure compliance with Iran's constitution and Islamic sharia law, has thrice previously called for changes to the law after it was passed by lawmakers, Ebtekar newspaper wrote. The publication fears that if the council sends back the bill, it will be buried by Iran's new parliament, which held its first session Wednesday and is dominated by conservatives and hardliners opposed to Rouhani.


Tyson Foods will shut U.S. pork plant as more workers catch COVID-19

Tyson Foods will shut U.S. pork plant as more workers catch COVID-19Tyson Foods Inc said on Thursday it will temporarily close an Iowa pork plant due to the coronavirus pandemic, a month after U.S. President Donald Trump ordered slaughterhouses to stay open to protect the country's food supply. Meat processors like Tyson Foods, WH Group's <0288.HK> Smithfield Foods and JBS USA temporarily closed about 20 slaughterhouses last month as workers fell ill with the new coronavirus, leading to shortages of certain products in grocery stores. An Iowa state official said 555 employees at Tyson's Storm Lake plant tested positive for the virus, about 22% of the workforce.


ICC allows former I.Coast president Gbagbo to leave Belgium

ICC allows former I.Coast president Gbagbo to leave BelgiumThe International Criminal Court on Thursday said former Ivory Coast President Laurent Gbagbo can leave Belgium under certain conditions following his acquittal last year over post-electoral violence that killed 3,000 people. Gbagbo and his deputy Charles Ble Goude were both cleared of crimes against humanity a year ago, eight years after the former West African strongman's arrest and transfer to the Hague-based court. Belgium agreed to host Gbagbo, 73, after he was released in February last year under strict conditions including that he would return to court for a prosecution appeal against his acquittal.


Senate Democrats take on GOP court-packing in blistering new report

Senate Democrats take on GOP court-packing in blistering new reportThe senators pointed to conservative activist Leonard Leo as the driving force behind the many of the president's appointments.


Pakistani villager urges India to return 'spy' pigeon

Pakistani villager urges India to return 'spy' pigeonThe owner of a pigeon "arrested" by India for spying says his bird was freed for Eid and is innocent.


Biden points out he was warning about pandemic unpreparedness in October while Trump tweeted about iPhones

Biden points out he was warning about pandemic unpreparedness in October while Trump tweeted about iPhonesFormer Vice President Joe Biden has a humble brag he'd like to share.In October 2019, months before the coronavirus outbreak began, Biden tweeted a warning to the United States, saying "We are not prepared for a pandemic." Biden then called out President Trump for rolling back measures the Obama administration took, likely referring to Trump's 2018 disbandment of the team directly responsible for handling a pandemic response.As Biden's Twitter account conveniently pointed out Thursday, while Biden was urging caution, Trump was tweeting about iPhones. Specifically, the president took issue with the button-less feature in iPhone models released in 2017 onward.> Two tweets from the same day in October. pic.twitter.com/rsSslLCsTW> > — Joe Biden (@JoeBiden) May 28, 2020In fairness to Trump, this was months before the first COVID-19 case had even been reported, and just one month after the newest iPhone model had been released. And we do miss those buttons.More stories from theweek.com Amy Klobuchar didn't prosecute officer at center of George Floyd's death after previous conduct complaints Minnesota governor activates National Guard as protests continue over death of George Floyd Trump retweets video declaring 'the only good Democrat is a dead Democrat'


Pharma chiefs see coronavirus vaccine by year-end, but challenges 'daunting'

Pharma chiefs see coronavirus vaccine by year-end, but challenges 'daunting'Pharmaceutical company executives said Thursday that one or several COVID-19 vaccines could begin rolling out before 2021, but warned the challenges would be "daunting" as it was estimated that 15 billion doses would be needed to halt the pandemic. Well over 100 labs around the world are scrambling to come up with a vaccine against the novel coronavirus, including 10 that have made it to the clinical trial stage. "The hope of many people is that we will have a vaccine, hopefully several, by the end of this year," Pascal Soriot, head of AstraZeneca, told a virtual briefing.


Minneapolis Man: Cop Who Kneeled on George Floyd ‘Tried to Kill Me’ in 2008

Minneapolis Man: Cop Who Kneeled on George Floyd ‘Tried to Kill Me’ in 2008Ira Latrell Toles didn’t immediately recognize Minneapolis cop Derek Chauvin in the now-viral video of him holding his knee on George Floyd’s neck as the handcuffed black man repeatedly told him he couldn’t breathe.But when news outlets identified the officers involved, Toles, 33, realized the man responsible for Floyd’s death was the same police officer who barged into his home and beat him up in the bathroom before shooting him in the stomach 12 years earlier while responding to a domestic violence call. “The officer that killed that guy might be the one that shot me,” Toles texted his sister on Tuesday night, according to messages shared with The Daily Beast. “They said his last name and I think it was him.”“It’s him,” his sister instantly replied.On Tuesday, Chauvin was one of four officers fired for his involvement in Floyd’s death, which has sparked protests across the country and calls for a federal hate-crime investigation. Local outlets reported that Chauvin was the officer who knelt on Floyd’s neck for several minutes—as the 46-year-old pleaded, “I’m about to die.” Floyd had no pulse when he was finally put into an ambulance.‘Burn It Down. Let Them Pay’: Deadly Chaos Erupts in Minneapolis as Fires Rage Over Police ViolenceMinneapolis Mayor Jacob Frey on Wednesday called for Hennepin County Attorney Mike Freeman to arrest and charge Chauvin with Floyd’s death. “Why is the man who killed George Floyd not in jail? If you had done it, or I had done it, we would be behind bars right now,” Frey said in a news conference.Toles believes that Floyd’s horrific death could have been prevented if Chauvin was properly punished for his violent arrest in May 2008. He said that while he pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor charge—and still suffers pain from the bullet hole in his lower stomach—Chauvin continued his career at the Minneapolis Police Department with nothing more than a slap on the wrist.“If he was reprimanded when he shot me, George Floyd would still be alive,” the IT professional said. Authorities said that just before 2 a.m on May 24, 2008, officers responded to a domestic violence call at an apartment complex on Columbus Ave South. The 911 operator could hear a woman yelling for somebody to stop hitting her, local media reported at the time. Toles, who was then 21, admits that the mother of his child called the cops on him that night, but he was surprised when several officers showed up without announcing themselves. “When I saw that he breached the front door, I ran in the bathroom,” Toles told The Daily Beast. “Then [Chauvin] starts kicking in that door. I was in the bathroom with a cigarette and no lighter.”The 33-year-old said that Chauvin broke into the bathroom and started to hit him without warning. Toles said he returned blows to the officer because “my natural reaction to someone hitting me is to stop them from hitting me.” “All I could do is assume it was the police because they didn’t announce themselves or ever give me a command,” he said. “I didn’t know what to think when he started hitting me. I swear he was hitting me with the gun.”According to local news reports, Chauvin shot and wounded Toles after he allegedly reached for an officer’s gun. Toles said he doesn’t remember being shot—just “being walked through the apartment until I collapsed in the main entrance where I was left to bleed until the paramedics came.” “I remember my baby mother screaming and crying also,” he added.Toles was taken to Hennepin County Medical Center, where he said he stayed for about three days. There, he learned Chauvin had shot him at such close range that the bullet went through his groin and came out his left butt cheek before hitting the bathroom wall. The wound, he said, left a hole that “never really closed” and is so large he can still stick a finger inside. Once he was released from the hospital, Toles said he was taken directly to court, where he was charged with two felony counts of obstructing legal process or arrest and a misdemeanor count of domestic assault. “I would assume my reaction would be to try to stop him from hitting me. If his first reaction was hitting me in the face that means I can’t see and I’m too disoriented to first locate his gun and then try to take it from him and for what?” Toles said. “To turn a misdemeanor disorderly situation into a felony situation that could have resulted in me dying? He tried to kill me in that bathroom.” Toles said he only spent a day or two in jail—where he was denied pain pills—for the charges before he was released. Three months later, he said he pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor charge as part of a deal.Chauvin and the other officers involved were put on paid administrative leave pending an investigation into the shooting—a standard procedure for the Minneapolis Police Department—but were later placed back into the field. “I knew he would do something again,” Toles said. “I wish we had smartphones back then.”The Minneapolis Police Department did not immediately respond to The Daily Beast’s request for comment. Chauvin, 44, is one of four officers who responded to a suspected “forgery in process” on Monday night—along with Thomas Lane, J Alexander Kueng, and Tou Thao.In the gut-wrenching, 10-minute video recorded by a bystander, Chauvin is seen pressing his knee on Floyd’s neck while Thao stands guard, trying to keep upset bystanders at bay. “Please, please, please, I can’t breathe. Please, man,” Floyd says in the footage that does not show the beginning of the arrest. “I’m about to die,” he says. A Minneapolis Fire Department report said Floyd did not have a pulse when he was loaded into an ambulance. He was pronounced dead at a nearby hospital shortly after in what police described as a “medical incident.”“We are looking and demanding that these officers be arrested and charged with the murder of George Floyd,” Ben Crump, a civil rights attorney representing the 46-year-old’s family, told The Daily Beast on Thursday. “My hope is that there will be effective and courageous leadership that will speak to the value of George Floyd’s life as an example to the world that black lives matter. It’s time for a change in Minneapolis.”Chauvin, who joined the force in 2001, has also been involved in several other police-involved shootings throughout his career. According to Communities United Against Police Brutality, 10 complaints have been filed against the now-former police officer—but Chauvin only ever received two verbal reprimands.In 2006, Chauvin was involved in the fatal shooting of 42-year-old Wayne Reyes, who allegedly stabbed two people before reportedly turning a gun on police. Chauvin was among six officers to respond to the stabbing. A year prior, Chauvin and another officer were also chasing a car that then hit and killed three people, according to Communities United Against Police Brutality.In 2011, the officer was also one of five officers placed on a standard three-day leave after the non-fatal shooting of a Native American man. The officers returned to work after the department determined that they had acted “appropriately.”The city’s Civilian Review Authority, which lists complaints prior to September 2012, shows five more complaints against Chauvin, which were closed without discipline. A prisoner at a Minnesota correctional facility sued Chauvin and seven other officers for “alleged violations of his federal constitutional rights” in 2006, although the case was dismissed and the details were not clear.Toles said that while he has not protested himself, he believes this horrific incident is a watershed moment for the Minneapolis Police Department—an agency that he says has become the butt of a joke in the black community.“We joke about it in the black community but we know that a white person calling the cops on us is gonna go in their favor,” he said. The 33-year-old added that while he believes Floyd's death will finally bring change and reform that is necessary for Minneapolis, it’s outraged residents who will ensure that justice is finally seen. He added that while he never filed a complaint in 2008, he is now looking to sue the Minneapolis Police Department for the violent incident. “We’ve all reached our tipping point. Water boils at 212 degrees,” he said. “We’re at 600.”Read more at The Daily Beast.Got a tip? Send it to The Daily Beast hereGet our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


Cockpit voice recorder of crashed Pakistani plane recovered

Cockpit voice recorder of crashed Pakistani plane recoveredThe cockpit voice recorder of the Pakistani airliner that crashed last week was found on Thursday, six days after the passenger plane went down in a crowded neighborhood near the airport in the city of Karachi, killing 97 people on board. The other part of the black box, a flight data recorder, was recovered within hours of the crash. There were only two survivors of the Airbus A320 crash, which was carrying 91 passengers and eight crew members.


Outrage in Iran over gruesome 'honour killing' of teenage girl

Outrage in Iran over gruesome 'honour killing' of teenage girlIran’s president has called for so-called honour killings to be outlawed following the gruesome murder of a teenage girl, allegedly by her father, for running away from home with an older man. Romina Ashrafi, 14, was allegedly beheaded by her father as punishment for fleeing her home in Talesh, near Tehran, with a 29-year-old man. The couple were detained and Romina was handed back to her family as her father appeared to have forgiven her, according to the state news agency IRNA. But on May 21, the girl’s father attacked her while she was sleeping and cut off her head with a sickle, according to a local news website called Gilkhabar. The father has since been arrested, as well as the man Romina eloped with according to local media reports. Under Iranian law, young girls can marry from 13 although most women get married in their early 20s according to the Associated Press. If convicted, the girl’s father would face a prison sentence of ten years. Iran’s penal code currently reduces the penalties for fathers, or other family members, who carry out honour killings on their relatives. Romina’s death has shocked Iran and prompted Hassan Rouhani, the president, to order his Cabinet to speed up legislation against so-called honour killings.


This Neo-Futuristic Home Found Its Inspiration in the British Countryside
Venezuela's Maduro vows to raise gasoline price as Iranian tanker nears

Venezuela's Maduro vows to raise gasoline price as Iranian tanker nearsVenezuelan President Nicolas Maduro on Wednesday pledged to begin charging citizens for gasoline, as the fourth cargo of a five-tanker flotilla bringing fuel from Iran approached the South American nation's exclusive economic zone. Iran is providing the country with up to 1.53 million barrels of gasoline and components to help it ease an acute scarcity that has forced Venezuelans to wait in hours-long lines at service stations or pay steep prices on the black market. With the arrival of the gasoline, Maduro said he would end the policy of providing fuel effectively for free after more than two decades of frozen pump prices.


Russia slams 'dangerous' US foreign policy moves

Russia slams 'dangerous' US foreign policy movesRussia said on Thursday the United States was acting in a dngerous and unpredictable way, after Washington withdrew from a key military treaty and moved to ramp up pressure on Iran. Foreign ministry spokeswoman Maria Zakharova made the comments after Washington announced it would end sanctions waivers for nations that remain in a nuclear accord signed with Iran.


Rohingya refugee crisis: 'The bodies were thrown out of the boat'

Rohingya refugee crisis: 'The bodies were thrown out of the boat'Khadiza Begum, a Rohingya refugee, left Myanmar to escape violence but found more horror at sea.


Republican Sen. Chuck Grassley: Trump has failed to justify ouster of watchdogs, fueling political speculation

Republican Sen. Chuck Grassley: Trump has failed to justify ouster of watchdogs, fueling political speculationThe unusual rebuke from Iowa Republican Sen. Chuck Grassley comes amid scrutiny of Trump's decision to fire the State Department's inspector general.


WH press secretary: Trump says he’s feeling ‘absolutely great’ after taking hydroxychloroquine

WH press secretary: Trump says he’s feeling ‘absolutely great’ after taking hydroxychloroquineAt a press briefing on Thursday, White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany told reporters President Trump said he’s feeling “absolutely great” after completing his treatment with the malaria drug hydroxychloroquine as a preventive measure against the coronavirus. In April, the FDA cautioned against using the drug to treat COVID-19 outside of a hospital setting or clinical trial.


Double murder suspect arrested after multistate manhunt

Double murder suspect arrested after multistate manhuntThe manhunt for the 23-year-old college senior had spanned Connecticut, New Jersey, Pennsylvania and Maryland.


NASA and SpaceX's launch was postponed, but at least we got to see their wildly corny spacesuits

NASA and SpaceX's launch was postponed, but at least we got to see their wildly corny spacesuitsThe much-heralded joint launch between NASA and Elon Musk's SpaceX was postponed on Wednesday due to light rain in Florida. It was a disappointing anticlimax for the first manned space launch from American soil since 2011 — all systems were "go" just an hour before astronauts Robert Behnken and Douglas Hurley were scheduled for 4:33 p.m. liftoff — but there was a silver lining to the clouds above Cape Canaveral: the world got to see, for the first time, NASA and SpaceX's alarmingly cheesy spacesuits, which looked something like man-sized Mentos dispensers topped off with garden galoshes.While many on Twitter hailed the gear as looking "soo cool" and "so f—ing dope," the correct reaction came from one commenter who said the suits "make [the astronauts] look like stunt extras in a low budget space movie." Whether or not Behnken and Hurley find themselves menaced by rubbery Venus ghouls in some misbegotten Roger Corman epic, the suits might lead to an even graver danger: not being able to extract their heads from the two-sizes-too small helmets that Musk looks to have grabbed from his local Spirit Halloween.If the spacemen are fortunate enough to somehow wrench the helmets from their skulls, NASA and SpaceX will give it another go on either Saturday or Sunday — probably not enough time to raid NASA's old closets for some real spacesuits.More stories from theweek.com Amy Klobuchar didn't prosecute officer at center of George Floyd's death after previous conduct complaints Minnesota governor activates National Guard as protests continue over death of George Floyd Trump retweets video declaring 'the only good Democrat is a dead Democrat'


Gang of 26 arrested for allegedly smuggling people from Vietnam to Europe in investigation prompted by Essex lorry deaths

Gang of 26 arrested for allegedly smuggling people from Vietnam to Europe in investigation prompted by Essex lorry deathsA gang of 26 suspected people smugglers have been arrested in France and Belgium in an investigation prompted by the deaths of 39 Vietnamese migrants found in the back of a lorry in Essex last year. The early morning raids took place in Paris and Brussels, with 13 people detained in each country. In Belgium, 11 Vietnamese and two Moroccans were held, while in France, authorities said the suspects were “mostly Vietnamese and French”. The suspects are allegedly part of an organised crime group that smuggles refugees from Asia, particularly from Vietnam, and that likely has transported up to several dozen people every day for several months, Europol said in a statement. “Prompted by the discovery of 39 deceased Vietnamese nationals inside a refrigerated trailer in Essex in the United Kingdom in October 2019, a joint investigation team (JIT) was created between Belgium, Ireland, France, the United Kingdom, Eurojust and Europol,” Europol said.


'100,000 people died, Joe, and all you did was try to help your friend the president': CNBC's Andrew Ross Sorkin unloaded on fellow anchor Joe Kernen over the severity of coronavirus

'100,000 people died, Joe, and all you did was try to help your friend the president': CNBC's Andrew Ross Sorkin unloaded on fellow anchor Joe Kernen over the severity of coronavirusThe exchange between the CNBC hosts lasted around a minute as they lobbed accusations at each other.


Failed Maduro coup leader flew on pro-govt magnate's plane

Failed Maduro coup leader flew on pro-govt magnate's planeIt was mid-January and Jordan Goudreau was itching to get going on a secret plan to raid Venezuela and arrest President Nicolás Maduro when the former special forces commando flew to the city of Barranquilla in Colombia to meet with his would-be partner in arms. To get there, Goudreau and two former Green Beret buddies relied on some unusual help: a chartered flight out of Miami’s Opa Locka executive airport on a plane owned by a Venezuelan businessman so close to the government of Hugo Chávez that he spent almost 4 years in a U.S. prison for trying to cover up clandestine cash payments to its allies. The owner of the Venezuela-registered Cessna Citation II with yellow and blue lines, identified with the tail number YV-3231, was Franklin Durán, according to three people familiar with the businessman’s movements who spoke on the condition of anonymity for fear of retaliation.


Turkey's Erdogan says many facilities to reopen on June 1

Turkey's Erdogan says many facilities to reopen on June 1Turkey will lift restrictions on intercity travel and allow restaurants, cafes, parks and sports facilities to reopen from June 1 as it eases restrictions imposed to curb the coronavirus outbreak, President Tayyip Erdogan said on Thursday. Restrictions will remain in place on the movements of those aged over 65 and under 18. The virus has killed nearly 4,500 people in Turkey, with more than 160,000 infections.


Study: Death Rates for Drivers Vary by Car Size

Study: Death Rates for Drivers Vary by Car SizeWhen it comes to vehicle crashes, size and weight matter a great deal. That’s the conclusion of a comprehensive, three-year study into how drivers fared in their vehicles over time by the Insuran...


Coronavirus: How the pandemic in US compares with rest of world

Coronavirus: How the pandemic in US compares with rest of worldMore than 100,000 people have died and the country is now slowly reopening amid fears of new spikes.


China passes draft Hong Kong security law, sparking fear and anger

China passes draft Hong Kong security law, sparking fear and anger"Hong Kong, in many ways, has become the new Berlin: the new meeting point of a big argument of big disagreement between two major powers."


Bills You Don't Have to Pay During the Coronavirus Pandemic
Protester who hung effigy of Kentucky Gov. Andy Beshear fired from job at car dealership

Protester who hung effigy of Kentucky Gov. Andy Beshear fired from job at car dealershipTerry Bush, president of the Kentucky 3 Percenters group, only hoisted the effigy, his wife Patsy said Wednesday morning.


George Floyd death: AOC says politicians scared of ‘political power of police’ as she and Ilhan Omar call for officer to be charged with murder

George Floyd death: AOC says politicians scared of ‘political power of police’ as she and Ilhan Omar call for officer to be charged with murderDemocratic congresswomen Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Ilhan Omar have called for the police officer who knelt on George Floyd‘s neck to be charged with murder, as the former claims politicians are scared of “the political power of police.”On Monday, four police officers in Minneapolis were fired after footage emerged of one of them kneeling on the neck of Mr Floyd, a black man, who repeatedly shouted that he couldn’t breathe.


Britain shuts embassy in North Korea after extreme lockdown

Britain shuts embassy in North Korea after extreme lockdownBritain has closed its embassy in the North Korean capital of Pyongyang and ordered its staff to leave the country. The surprise closure is linked to coronavirus-related restrictions in place since earlier this year, which the Foreign Office said had left it unable to "rotate our staff and sustain the operation of the Embassy". It follows a similar evacuation of a number of other diplomats and foreign residents from the North Korean capital in March. A number of sources told the US news website NK News on Wednesday that the British diplomats left North Korea by land, crossing the DPRK’s border with China earlier on Wednesday. Flights out of the country remain grounded. Hundreds of foreign residents remain in Pyongyang, including diplomats from the Swedish and Russian embassies and a small number of aid workers, though absent representatives from Germany, Switzerland, France, and Italy. There are currently no British residents in the country. Resident diplomats had previously raised their concerns about the severity of the DPRK authorities’ coronavirus-prevention rules, which saw the country close its borders and place them under effective house arrest for over a month earlier in the year.


Tesla slashes prices to boost demand

Tesla slashes prices to boost demandTesla Inc. has cut prices of its electric vehicles by as much as 6% in North America following a decline in auto demand in the region during weeks of lockdown that have now started to ease.


English court to weigh recognition of Maduro, Guaido in Venezuela gold case

English court to weigh recognition of Maduro, Guaido in Venezuela gold caseAn English court on Thursday said it would need to decide which of Venezuela's dueling political factions to recognize before ruling on President Nicolas Maduro's request for the Bank of England to hand over gold the country has in its vaults. Venezuela for decades stored gold that makes up part of its central bank reserves in the vaults of foreign financial institutions including the Bank of England, which provides gold custodian services to developing countries. The bank since 2018 has refused to transfer the funds to Maduro's government, which Britain does not recognize.


Ford made its police SUV heat itself up to more than 133 degrees to kill the coronavirus

Ford made its police SUV heat itself up to more than 133 degrees to kill the coronavirusFord worked with Ohio State and police departments to develop the tech. Ford has a longstanding relationship with law enforcement.


A pharmacist known as 'the Mask Man' has been charged with hoarding $200,000 worth of N95 masks and price-gouging customers

A pharmacist known as 'the Mask Man' has been charged with hoarding $200,000 worth of N95 masks and price-gouging customersThe DOJ said the pharmacist, 66-year-old Richard Schirripa, sold $2,690 of masks to an undercover officer and said he felt "like a drug dealer."


Navy admiral submits results of probe on virus-infected ship

Navy admiral submits results of probe on virus-infected shipThe Navy's top admiral on Wednesday received the results of an internal investigation into the spread of the coronavirus aboard the USS Theodore Roosevelt and the firing of the aircraft carrier's skipper in April. The report is not expected to be made public until decisions are made about potentially restoring Capt. Brett Crozier to command of the Roosevelt or disciplining other officers. It was submitted Wednesday to Adm. Mike Gilday, the chief of naval operations.


Asian shares mixed after Wall Street rally; Hong Kong lower

Asian shares mixed after Wall Street rally; Hong Kong lowerAsian stocks were mixed after an upbeat open on Thursday, as investors pinned their hopes on an economic rebound from the coronavirus crisis. Shares rose in Tokyo, Sydney and Shanghai but dropped in Hong Kong, where tensions are flaring over Beijing’s effort to exert more control over the former British colony. The most recent developments are another thorn in a relationship already testy over China's handling of the early stages of the coronavirus outbreaks and over longstanding trade and other antagonisms.


Here are the likely contenders on Biden's vice president shortlist

Here are the likely contenders on Biden's vice president shortlistWhile Joe Biden has committed to selecting a female running mate, few further details are confirmed. Here's a look at five women in the picture.


Coronavirus infections are rising as states reopen, potentially signaling a second wave

Coronavirus infections are rising as states reopen, potentially signaling a second waveTwenty states reported an increase in new infections during the week ending May 24, up from 13 states the week before.


The Chinese CDC now says the coronavirus didn't jump to people at the Wuhan wet market — instead, it was the site of a super-spreader event

The Chinese CDC now says the coronavirus didn't jump to people at the Wuhan wet market — instead, it was the site of a super-spreader eventThe origin of the new coronavirus still isn't known. But according to the Chinese CDC, it isn't the wet market in Wuhan.


Iran Guards warn US after receiving new combat vessels

Iran Guards warn US after receiving new combat vesselsIran's Revolutionary Guards on Thursday warned the United States against its naval presence in the Gulf as they received 110 new combat vessels. "We announce today that wherever the Americans are, we are right next to them, and they will feel our presence even more in the near future," the Guards' navy chief Rear Admiral Alireza Tangsiri said during a ceremony in southern Iran. Iran and the United States have appeared to be on the brink of an all-out confrontation twice in the past year.


Mexican drug lord pleads poverty in bid to escape arrest

Mexican drug lord pleads poverty in bid to escape arrestDrug lord Rafael Caro Quintero, a notorious underworld figure who is on the FBI’s most wanted list for the murder of a federal agent over three decades ago, said in a legal appeal that he has no money, is too old to work and has no pension. The odd plea was filed Tuesday by Caro Quintero's lawyer seeking an injunction against his arrest or extradition to the United States for the kidnapping and murder of DEA Special Agent Enrique Camarena in Mexico in 1985. The U.S. government says Caro Quintero and his family remain in the drug trade.


Huawei CFO Meng loses key court fight against extradition to United States

Huawei CFO Meng loses key court fight against extradition to United StatesHuawei Technologies Co's Chief Financial Officer Meng Wanzhou was dealt a setback by a Canadian court on Wednesday as she tries to avoid extradition to the United States to face bank fraud charges, dashing hopes for an end to her 18-month house arrest in Vancouver. The ruling, which could further deteriorate relations between Ottawa and Beijing, elicited immediate strong reaction from China's embassy in Canada, which said Canada is "accomplice to United States efforts to bring down Huawei and Chinese high-tech companies."


Five UK mercenaries offered $150,000 each to fly helicopters for Gen Haftar in Libya, say UN

Five UK mercenaries offered $150,000 each to fly helicopters for Gen Haftar in Libya, say UNFive British mercenaries involved in an operation to fly assault helicopters for Libya’s renegade General Khalifa Haftar were offered bounties of up to $150,000 each for their role in the daring plot which went awry. The men, comprised of former Royal Marines and RAF personnel, were among 20 foreign mercenaries who traveled to Libya last June in an operation to pilot assault helicopters and speed boats to intercept Turkish ships ferrying weapons to Haftar’s opponents – the UN-backed government in Tripoli. A source with knowledge of the secret UN report which revealed the plot told The Daily Telegraph that the men involved were believed on sums of “$30,000 to $50,000 a month, or $20,000 to $40,000 per month depending on whether you were pilot or aircrewman”. “It was a three-month contract”. The Telegraph can reveal that the UN investigation concluded that the operation was led by Steven Lodge, a former South African Air Force officer who also served in the British military. Mr. Lodge, who now resides in Scotland, is a director of Umbra Aviation, a South-Africa based company that has recently supplied helicopters to the Government of Mozambique, where the country is battling a jihadist insurgency in its restive north. Speaking to The Telegraph over the phone, Mr. Lodge flatly denied the chronicle of events detailed in the UN report. “All the info is incorrect - the whole facts behind the whole thing,” he said.


'It's a Sad Result.' Mixed Feelings in Hong Kong Over U.S. Announcement on City's Autonomy

'It's a Sad Result.' Mixed Feelings in Hong Kong Over U.S. Announcement on City's AutonomyOne leading pro-democracy figure thanked Washington, others said the move was bad news for Hong Kong people


UConn student wanted in connection to 2 deaths is captured

UConn student wanted in connection to 2 deaths is captured"Peter Manfredonia has been found & is in custody" after a nearly weeklong manhunt, officials said Wednesday.


Amy Klobuchar didn't prosecute officer at center of George Floyd's death after previous conduct complaints

Amy Klobuchar didn't prosecute officer at center of George Floyd's death after previous conduct complaintsGeorge Floyd's death in police custody is renewing criticism of Sen. Amy Klobuchar's (D-Minn.) prosecutorial record.Before she became a senator and a top contender for former Vice President Joe Biden's vice presidential spot, Klobuchar spent eight years as the Hennepin County attorney, in charge of prosecution for Minneapolis. And while in that position, Klobuchar declined to prosecute multiple police officers cited for excessive force, including the officer who kneeled on Floyd's neck as he protested, The Guardian reports.Ex-Minneapolis police officer Derick Chauvin saw at least 10 conduct complaints during his 19-year tenure before he was fired Tuesday, according to a database that documents complaints against police. In particular, he was involved in the shooting death of a man who had stabbed other people before attacking police, as well as some other undisclosed complaints. Klobuchar did not prosecute Chauvin for the first death, and he was later placed on leave when he and other officers shot and wounded a Native American man in 2011.As The Washington Post noted in March, Klobuchar "declined to bring charges in more than two dozen cases in which people were killed in encounters with police" as Hennepin County attorney. Instead, she "aggressively prosecuted smaller offenses" that "have been criticized for their disproportionate effect on poor and minority communities," the Post continues. And as Klobuchar undergoes vetting to become a possible vice presidential candidate, that track record is being scrutinized and criticized once again.More stories from theweek.com Minneapolis official calls for naming 'disease' of racism a public health issue after George Floyd death Trump retweets video declaring 'the only good Democrat is a dead Democrat' Trump signs executive order seeking regulations on social media


Levi’s Is Taking 50% off These Best-Selling Jeans Right Now
One of Trump's favorite pollsters shows his approval plummeting

One of Trump's favorite pollsters shows his approval plummetingPresident Trump’s approval rating has plummeted since late February, according to the Rasmussen daily tracking poll, which the president frequently cited during his first three years in office.


CDC changes its 'confusing' guidelines on coronavirus and surfaces. Here's what we know.

CDC changes its 'confusing' guidelines on coronavirus and surfaces. Here's what we know.This new CDC update may quell some major concerns about how COVID-19 is transmitted, but plenty of questions still remain. Here's what to know.


Warrants describe nightmarish child abuse case in Tennessee

Warrants describe nightmarish child abuse case in TennesseeArrest warrants in a Tennessee couple's abuse case describe a hellish existence for four children in their legal custody, a nightmare that finally ended after a little boy was spotted walking alone along a Roane County road. Michael Anthony Gray Sr., 63, and his wife, Shirley Ann Gray, 60, were arrested Monday on charges of aggravated child abuse, especially aggravated kidnapping, aggravated child neglect and abuse of a corpse, authorities said. The oldest had been locked in the partially flooded, unfinished basement for stealing food shortly after the family moved to the home in June 2016, authorities said, "and had no contact with anyone outside the basement, only given small amounts of food, being white bread and some water,” the warrants state.


So-called honor killing of teen girl sparks outcry in Iran

So-called honor killing of teen girl sparks outcry in IranThe so-called honor killing of a 14-year-old Iranian girl by her dad, who reportedly beheaded her as she slept, has sparked a nationwide outcry.


Iran outraged by 'honour killing' of 14-year-old girl Romina Ashrafi

Iran outraged by 'honour killing' of 14-year-old girl Romina AshrafiThe killing of an Iranian teen by her father after she eloped with an older man sparked outrage on Wednesday, with local media denouncing "institutionalised violence" in "patriarchal" Iran. Iranian media covered the apparent "honour" crime extensively, with Ebtekar newspaper leading its front page with the headline "Unsafe father's house". According to local media, Romina Ashrafi was killed in her sleep on May 21 by her father, who decapitated her in the family home in Talesh in northern Gilan province. The reports said her father had refused her permission to marry a man fifteen years her senior, spurring her to run away, but she was returned home after her father reported her. The legal marriage age in Iran is 13 for women. Iranian media reported that after authorities detained the teenager, she told a judge she feared for her life if she was returned to home. But what most outraged public opinion was the lenient punishment the father is likely to face, Ebtekar wrote. The newspaper notes that Iran's normal "eye for an eye" retributive justice does not apply to fathers who kill their children. Accordingly, he is likely to face three to 10 years in prison, a sentence that could be reduced further, the newspaper wrote, denouncing the "institutionalised violence" of Iran's "patriarchal culture". With the farsi hashtag Romina_Ashrafi focusing outrage on Twitter, President Hassan Rouhani "expressed his regrets" in a cabinet meeting on Wednesday, pleading for the speedy passing of several anti-violence bills, his office said. On Twitter, Vice President for Women and Family Affairs, Masoumeh Ebtekar, said a bill on the protection of young people was in the "final phase" of validation by Iran's Guardian Council. The council, which vets legislation to ensure compliance with Iran's constitution and Islamic sharia law, has thrice previously called for changes to the law after it was passed by lawmakers, Ebtekar newspaper wrote. The publication fears that if the council sends back the bill, it will be buried by Iran's new parliament, which held its first session Wednesday and is dominated by conservatives and hardliners opposed to Rouhani.


Tyson Foods will shut U.S. pork plant as more workers catch COVID-19

Tyson Foods will shut U.S. pork plant as more workers catch COVID-19Tyson Foods Inc said on Thursday it will temporarily close an Iowa pork plant due to the coronavirus pandemic, a month after U.S. President Donald Trump ordered slaughterhouses to stay open to protect the country's food supply. Meat processors like Tyson Foods, WH Group's <0288.HK> Smithfield Foods and JBS USA temporarily closed about 20 slaughterhouses last month as workers fell ill with the new coronavirus, leading to shortages of certain products in grocery stores. An Iowa state official said 555 employees at Tyson's Storm Lake plant tested positive for the virus, about 22% of the workforce.


ICC allows former I.Coast president Gbagbo to leave Belgium

ICC allows former I.Coast president Gbagbo to leave BelgiumThe International Criminal Court on Thursday said former Ivory Coast President Laurent Gbagbo can leave Belgium under certain conditions following his acquittal last year over post-electoral violence that killed 3,000 people. Gbagbo and his deputy Charles Ble Goude were both cleared of crimes against humanity a year ago, eight years after the former West African strongman's arrest and transfer to the Hague-based court. Belgium agreed to host Gbagbo, 73, after he was released in February last year under strict conditions including that he would return to court for a prosecution appeal against his acquittal.


Senate Democrats take on GOP court-packing in blistering new report

Senate Democrats take on GOP court-packing in blistering new reportThe senators pointed to conservative activist Leonard Leo as the driving force behind the many of the president's appointments.


Pakistani villager urges India to return 'spy' pigeon

Pakistani villager urges India to return 'spy' pigeonThe owner of a pigeon "arrested" by India for spying says his bird was freed for Eid and is innocent.


Biden points out he was warning about pandemic unpreparedness in October while Trump tweeted about iPhones

Biden points out he was warning about pandemic unpreparedness in October while Trump tweeted about iPhonesFormer Vice President Joe Biden has a humble brag he'd like to share.In October 2019, months before the coronavirus outbreak began, Biden tweeted a warning to the United States, saying "We are not prepared for a pandemic." Biden then called out President Trump for rolling back measures the Obama administration took, likely referring to Trump's 2018 disbandment of the team directly responsible for handling a pandemic response.As Biden's Twitter account conveniently pointed out Thursday, while Biden was urging caution, Trump was tweeting about iPhones. Specifically, the president took issue with the button-less feature in iPhone models released in 2017 onward.> Two tweets from the same day in October. pic.twitter.com/rsSslLCsTW> > — Joe Biden (@JoeBiden) May 28, 2020In fairness to Trump, this was months before the first COVID-19 case had even been reported, and just one month after the newest iPhone model had been released. And we do miss those buttons.More stories from theweek.com Amy Klobuchar didn't prosecute officer at center of George Floyd's death after previous conduct complaints Minnesota governor activates National Guard as protests continue over death of George Floyd Trump retweets video declaring 'the only good Democrat is a dead Democrat'


Pharma chiefs see coronavirus vaccine by year-end, but challenges 'daunting'

Pharma chiefs see coronavirus vaccine by year-end, but challenges 'daunting'Pharmaceutical company executives said Thursday that one or several COVID-19 vaccines could begin rolling out before 2021, but warned the challenges would be "daunting" as it was estimated that 15 billion doses would be needed to halt the pandemic. Well over 100 labs around the world are scrambling to come up with a vaccine against the novel coronavirus, including 10 that have made it to the clinical trial stage. "The hope of many people is that we will have a vaccine, hopefully several, by the end of this year," Pascal Soriot, head of AstraZeneca, told a virtual briefing.


Minneapolis Man: Cop Who Kneeled on George Floyd ‘Tried to Kill Me’ in 2008

Minneapolis Man: Cop Who Kneeled on George Floyd ‘Tried to Kill Me’ in 2008Ira Latrell Toles didn’t immediately recognize Minneapolis cop Derek Chauvin in the now-viral video of him holding his knee on George Floyd’s neck as the handcuffed black man repeatedly told him he couldn’t breathe.But when news outlets identified the officers involved, Toles, 33, realized the man responsible for Floyd’s death was the same police officer who barged into his home and beat him up in the bathroom before shooting him in the stomach 12 years earlier while responding to a domestic violence call. “The officer that killed that guy might be the one that shot me,” Toles texted his sister on Tuesday night, according to messages shared with The Daily Beast. “They said his last name and I think it was him.”“It’s him,” his sister instantly replied.On Tuesday, Chauvin was one of four officers fired for his involvement in Floyd’s death, which has sparked protests across the country and calls for a federal hate-crime investigation. Local outlets reported that Chauvin was the officer who knelt on Floyd’s neck for several minutes—as the 46-year-old pleaded, “I’m about to die.” Floyd had no pulse when he was finally put into an ambulance.‘Burn It Down. Let Them Pay’: Deadly Chaos Erupts in Minneapolis as Fires Rage Over Police ViolenceMinneapolis Mayor Jacob Frey on Wednesday called for Hennepin County Attorney Mike Freeman to arrest and charge Chauvin with Floyd’s death. “Why is the man who killed George Floyd not in jail? If you had done it, or I had done it, we would be behind bars right now,” Frey said in a news conference.Toles believes that Floyd’s horrific death could have been prevented if Chauvin was properly punished for his violent arrest in May 2008. He said that while he pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor charge—and still suffers pain from the bullet hole in his lower stomach—Chauvin continued his career at the Minneapolis Police Department with nothing more than a slap on the wrist.“If he was reprimanded when he shot me, George Floyd would still be alive,” the IT professional said. Authorities said that just before 2 a.m on May 24, 2008, officers responded to a domestic violence call at an apartment complex on Columbus Ave South. The 911 operator could hear a woman yelling for somebody to stop hitting her, local media reported at the time. Toles, who was then 21, admits that the mother of his child called the cops on him that night, but he was surprised when several officers showed up without announcing themselves. “When I saw that he breached the front door, I ran in the bathroom,” Toles told The Daily Beast. “Then [Chauvin] starts kicking in that door. I was in the bathroom with a cigarette and no lighter.”The 33-year-old said that Chauvin broke into the bathroom and started to hit him without warning. Toles said he returned blows to the officer because “my natural reaction to someone hitting me is to stop them from hitting me.” “All I could do is assume it was the police because they didn’t announce themselves or ever give me a command,” he said. “I didn’t know what to think when he started hitting me. I swear he was hitting me with the gun.”According to local news reports, Chauvin shot and wounded Toles after he allegedly reached for an officer’s gun. Toles said he doesn’t remember being shot—just “being walked through the apartment until I collapsed in the main entrance where I was left to bleed until the paramedics came.” “I remember my baby mother screaming and crying also,” he added.Toles was taken to Hennepin County Medical Center, where he said he stayed for about three days. There, he learned Chauvin had shot him at such close range that the bullet went through his groin and came out his left butt cheek before hitting the bathroom wall. The wound, he said, left a hole that “never really closed” and is so large he can still stick a finger inside. Once he was released from the hospital, Toles said he was taken directly to court, where he was charged with two felony counts of obstructing legal process or arrest and a misdemeanor count of domestic assault. “I would assume my reaction would be to try to stop him from hitting me. If his first reaction was hitting me in the face that means I can’t see and I’m too disoriented to first locate his gun and then try to take it from him and for what?” Toles said. “To turn a misdemeanor disorderly situation into a felony situation that could have resulted in me dying? He tried to kill me in that bathroom.” Toles said he only spent a day or two in jail—where he was denied pain pills—for the charges before he was released. Three months later, he said he pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor charge as part of a deal.Chauvin and the other officers involved were put on paid administrative leave pending an investigation into the shooting—a standard procedure for the Minneapolis Police Department—but were later placed back into the field. “I knew he would do something again,” Toles said. “I wish we had smartphones back then.”The Minneapolis Police Department did not immediately respond to The Daily Beast’s request for comment. Chauvin, 44, is one of four officers who responded to a suspected “forgery in process” on Monday night—along with Thomas Lane, J Alexander Kueng, and Tou Thao.In the gut-wrenching, 10-minute video recorded by a bystander, Chauvin is seen pressing his knee on Floyd’s neck while Thao stands guard, trying to keep upset bystanders at bay. “Please, please, please, I can’t breathe. Please, man,” Floyd says in the footage that does not show the beginning of the arrest. “I’m about to die,” he says. A Minneapolis Fire Department report said Floyd did not have a pulse when he was loaded into an ambulance. He was pronounced dead at a nearby hospital shortly after in what police described as a “medical incident.”“We are looking and demanding that these officers be arrested and charged with the murder of George Floyd,” Ben Crump, a civil rights attorney representing the 46-year-old’s family, told The Daily Beast on Thursday. “My hope is that there will be effective and courageous leadership that will speak to the value of George Floyd’s life as an example to the world that black lives matter. It’s time for a change in Minneapolis.”Chauvin, who joined the force in 2001, has also been involved in several other police-involved shootings throughout his career. According to Communities United Against Police Brutality, 10 complaints have been filed against the now-former police officer—but Chauvin only ever received two verbal reprimands.In 2006, Chauvin was involved in the fatal shooting of 42-year-old Wayne Reyes, who allegedly stabbed two people before reportedly turning a gun on police. Chauvin was among six officers to respond to the stabbing. A year prior, Chauvin and another officer were also chasing a car that then hit and killed three people, according to Communities United Against Police Brutality.In 2011, the officer was also one of five officers placed on a standard three-day leave after the non-fatal shooting of a Native American man. The officers returned to work after the department determined that they had acted “appropriately.”The city’s Civilian Review Authority, which lists complaints prior to September 2012, shows five more complaints against Chauvin, which were closed without discipline. A prisoner at a Minnesota correctional facility sued Chauvin and seven other officers for “alleged violations of his federal constitutional rights” in 2006, although the case was dismissed and the details were not clear.Toles said that while he has not protested himself, he believes this horrific incident is a watershed moment for the Minneapolis Police Department—an agency that he says has become the butt of a joke in the black community.“We joke about it in the black community but we know that a white person calling the cops on us is gonna go in their favor,” he said. The 33-year-old added that while he believes Floyd's death will finally bring change and reform that is necessary for Minneapolis, it’s outraged residents who will ensure that justice is finally seen. He added that while he never filed a complaint in 2008, he is now looking to sue the Minneapolis Police Department for the violent incident. “We’ve all reached our tipping point. Water boils at 212 degrees,” he said. “We’re at 600.”Read more at The Daily Beast.Got a tip? Send it to The Daily Beast hereGet our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


Cockpit voice recorder of crashed Pakistani plane recovered

Cockpit voice recorder of crashed Pakistani plane recoveredThe cockpit voice recorder of the Pakistani airliner that crashed last week was found on Thursday, six days after the passenger plane went down in a crowded neighborhood near the airport in the city of Karachi, killing 97 people on board. The other part of the black box, a flight data recorder, was recovered within hours of the crash. There were only two survivors of the Airbus A320 crash, which was carrying 91 passengers and eight crew members.


Outrage in Iran over gruesome 'honour killing' of teenage girl

Outrage in Iran over gruesome 'honour killing' of teenage girlIran’s president has called for so-called honour killings to be outlawed following the gruesome murder of a teenage girl, allegedly by her father, for running away from home with an older man. Romina Ashrafi, 14, was allegedly beheaded by her father as punishment for fleeing her home in Talesh, near Tehran, with a 29-year-old man. The couple were detained and Romina was handed back to her family as her father appeared to have forgiven her, according to the state news agency IRNA. But on May 21, the girl’s father attacked her while she was sleeping and cut off her head with a sickle, according to a local news website called Gilkhabar. The father has since been arrested, as well as the man Romina eloped with according to local media reports. Under Iranian law, young girls can marry from 13 although most women get married in their early 20s according to the Associated Press. If convicted, the girl’s father would face a prison sentence of ten years. Iran’s penal code currently reduces the penalties for fathers, or other family members, who carry out honour killings on their relatives. Romina’s death has shocked Iran and prompted Hassan Rouhani, the president, to order his Cabinet to speed up legislation against so-called honour killings.


This Neo-Futuristic Home Found Its Inspiration in the British Countryside
Venezuela's Maduro vows to raise gasoline price as Iranian tanker nears

Venezuela's Maduro vows to raise gasoline price as Iranian tanker nearsVenezuelan President Nicolas Maduro on Wednesday pledged to begin charging citizens for gasoline, as the fourth cargo of a five-tanker flotilla bringing fuel from Iran approached the South American nation's exclusive economic zone. Iran is providing the country with up to 1.53 million barrels of gasoline and components to help it ease an acute scarcity that has forced Venezuelans to wait in hours-long lines at service stations or pay steep prices on the black market. With the arrival of the gasoline, Maduro said he would end the policy of providing fuel effectively for free after more than two decades of frozen pump prices.


Russia slams 'dangerous' US foreign policy moves

Russia slams 'dangerous' US foreign policy movesRussia said on Thursday the United States was acting in a dngerous and unpredictable way, after Washington withdrew from a key military treaty and moved to ramp up pressure on Iran. Foreign ministry spokeswoman Maria Zakharova made the comments after Washington announced it would end sanctions waivers for nations that remain in a nuclear accord signed with Iran.


Rohingya refugee crisis: 'The bodies were thrown out of the boat'

Rohingya refugee crisis: 'The bodies were thrown out of the boat'Khadiza Begum, a Rohingya refugee, left Myanmar to escape violence but found more horror at sea.


Republican Sen. Chuck Grassley: Trump has failed to justify ouster of watchdogs, fueling political speculation

Republican Sen. Chuck Grassley: Trump has failed to justify ouster of watchdogs, fueling political speculationThe unusual rebuke from Iowa Republican Sen. Chuck Grassley comes amid scrutiny of Trump's decision to fire the State Department's inspector general.


WH press secretary: Trump says he’s feeling ‘absolutely great’ after taking hydroxychloroquine

WH press secretary: Trump says he’s feeling ‘absolutely great’ after taking hydroxychloroquineAt a press briefing on Thursday, White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany told reporters President Trump said he’s feeling “absolutely great” after completing his treatment with the malaria drug hydroxychloroquine as a preventive measure against the coronavirus. In April, the FDA cautioned against using the drug to treat COVID-19 outside of a hospital setting or clinical trial.


Double murder suspect arrested after multistate manhunt

Double murder suspect arrested after multistate manhuntThe manhunt for the 23-year-old college senior had spanned Connecticut, New Jersey, Pennsylvania and Maryland.


NASA and SpaceX's launch was postponed, but at least we got to see their wildly corny spacesuits

NASA and SpaceX's launch was postponed, but at least we got to see their wildly corny spacesuitsThe much-heralded joint launch between NASA and Elon Musk's SpaceX was postponed on Wednesday due to light rain in Florida. It was a disappointing anticlimax for the first manned space launch from American soil since 2011 — all systems were "go" just an hour before astronauts Robert Behnken and Douglas Hurley were scheduled for 4:33 p.m. liftoff — but there was a silver lining to the clouds above Cape Canaveral: the world got to see, for the first time, NASA and SpaceX's alarmingly cheesy spacesuits, which looked something like man-sized Mentos dispensers topped off with garden galoshes.While many on Twitter hailed the gear as looking "soo cool" and "so f—ing dope," the correct reaction came from one commenter who said the suits "make [the astronauts] look like stunt extras in a low budget space movie." Whether or not Behnken and Hurley find themselves menaced by rubbery Venus ghouls in some misbegotten Roger Corman epic, the suits might lead to an even graver danger: not being able to extract their heads from the two-sizes-too small helmets that Musk looks to have grabbed from his local Spirit Halloween.If the spacemen are fortunate enough to somehow wrench the helmets from their skulls, NASA and SpaceX will give it another go on either Saturday or Sunday — probably not enough time to raid NASA's old closets for some real spacesuits.More stories from theweek.com Amy Klobuchar didn't prosecute officer at center of George Floyd's death after previous conduct complaints Minnesota governor activates National Guard as protests continue over death of George Floyd Trump retweets video declaring 'the only good Democrat is a dead Democrat'


Gang of 26 arrested for allegedly smuggling people from Vietnam to Europe in investigation prompted by Essex lorry deaths

Gang of 26 arrested for allegedly smuggling people from Vietnam to Europe in investigation prompted by Essex lorry deathsA gang of 26 suspected people smugglers have been arrested in France and Belgium in an investigation prompted by the deaths of 39 Vietnamese migrants found in the back of a lorry in Essex last year. The early morning raids took place in Paris and Brussels, with 13 people detained in each country. In Belgium, 11 Vietnamese and two Moroccans were held, while in France, authorities said the suspects were “mostly Vietnamese and French”. The suspects are allegedly part of an organised crime group that smuggles refugees from Asia, particularly from Vietnam, and that likely has transported up to several dozen people every day for several months, Europol said in a statement. “Prompted by the discovery of 39 deceased Vietnamese nationals inside a refrigerated trailer in Essex in the United Kingdom in October 2019, a joint investigation team (JIT) was created between Belgium, Ireland, France, the United Kingdom, Eurojust and Europol,” Europol said.


'100,000 people died, Joe, and all you did was try to help your friend the president': CNBC's Andrew Ross Sorkin unloaded on fellow anchor Joe Kernen over the severity of coronavirus

'100,000 people died, Joe, and all you did was try to help your friend the president': CNBC's Andrew Ross Sorkin unloaded on fellow anchor Joe Kernen over the severity of coronavirusThe exchange between the CNBC hosts lasted around a minute as they lobbed accusations at each other.


Failed Maduro coup leader flew on pro-govt magnate's plane

Failed Maduro coup leader flew on pro-govt magnate's planeIt was mid-January and Jordan Goudreau was itching to get going on a secret plan to raid Venezuela and arrest President Nicolás Maduro when the former special forces commando flew to the city of Barranquilla in Colombia to meet with his would-be partner in arms. To get there, Goudreau and two former Green Beret buddies relied on some unusual help: a chartered flight out of Miami’s Opa Locka executive airport on a plane owned by a Venezuelan businessman so close to the government of Hugo Chávez that he spent almost 4 years in a U.S. prison for trying to cover up clandestine cash payments to its allies. The owner of the Venezuela-registered Cessna Citation II with yellow and blue lines, identified with the tail number YV-3231, was Franklin Durán, according to three people familiar with the businessman’s movements who spoke on the condition of anonymity for fear of retaliation.


Turkey's Erdogan says many facilities to reopen on June 1

Turkey's Erdogan says many facilities to reopen on June 1Turkey will lift restrictions on intercity travel and allow restaurants, cafes, parks and sports facilities to reopen from June 1 as it eases restrictions imposed to curb the coronavirus outbreak, President Tayyip Erdogan said on Thursday. Restrictions will remain in place on the movements of those aged over 65 and under 18. The virus has killed nearly 4,500 people in Turkey, with more than 160,000 infections.


Study: Death Rates for Drivers Vary by Car Size

Study: Death Rates for Drivers Vary by Car SizeWhen it comes to vehicle crashes, size and weight matter a great deal. That’s the conclusion of a comprehensive, three-year study into how drivers fared in their vehicles over time by the Insuran...


Coronavirus: How the pandemic in US compares with rest of world

Coronavirus: How the pandemic in US compares with rest of worldMore than 100,000 people have died and the country is now slowly reopening amid fears of new spikes.


China passes draft Hong Kong security law, sparking fear and anger

China passes draft Hong Kong security law, sparking fear and anger"Hong Kong, in many ways, has become the new Berlin: the new meeting point of a big argument of big disagreement between two major powers."


Bills You Don't Have to Pay During the Coronavirus Pandemic
Protester who hung effigy of Kentucky Gov. Andy Beshear fired from job at car dealership

Protester who hung effigy of Kentucky Gov. Andy Beshear fired from job at car dealershipTerry Bush, president of the Kentucky 3 Percenters group, only hoisted the effigy, his wife Patsy said Wednesday morning.


George Floyd death: AOC says politicians scared of ‘political power of police’ as she and Ilhan Omar call for officer to be charged with murder

George Floyd death: AOC says politicians scared of ‘political power of police’ as she and Ilhan Omar call for officer to be charged with murderDemocratic congresswomen Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Ilhan Omar have called for the police officer who knelt on George Floyd‘s neck to be charged with murder, as the former claims politicians are scared of “the political power of police.”On Monday, four police officers in Minneapolis were fired after footage emerged of one of them kneeling on the neck of Mr Floyd, a black man, who repeatedly shouted that he couldn’t breathe.


Britain shuts embassy in North Korea after extreme lockdown

Britain shuts embassy in North Korea after extreme lockdownBritain has closed its embassy in the North Korean capital of Pyongyang and ordered its staff to leave the country. The surprise closure is linked to coronavirus-related restrictions in place since earlier this year, which the Foreign Office said had left it unable to "rotate our staff and sustain the operation of the Embassy". It follows a similar evacuation of a number of other diplomats and foreign residents from the North Korean capital in March. A number of sources told the US news website NK News on Wednesday that the British diplomats left North Korea by land, crossing the DPRK’s border with China earlier on Wednesday. Flights out of the country remain grounded. Hundreds of foreign residents remain in Pyongyang, including diplomats from the Swedish and Russian embassies and a small number of aid workers, though absent representatives from Germany, Switzerland, France, and Italy. There are currently no British residents in the country. Resident diplomats had previously raised their concerns about the severity of the DPRK authorities’ coronavirus-prevention rules, which saw the country close its borders and place them under effective house arrest for over a month earlier in the year.


Tesla slashes prices to boost demand

Tesla slashes prices to boost demandTesla Inc. has cut prices of its electric vehicles by as much as 6% in North America following a decline in auto demand in the region during weeks of lockdown that have now started to ease.


English court to weigh recognition of Maduro, Guaido in Venezuela gold case

English court to weigh recognition of Maduro, Guaido in Venezuela gold caseAn English court on Thursday said it would need to decide which of Venezuela's dueling political factions to recognize before ruling on President Nicolas Maduro's request for the Bank of England to hand over gold the country has in its vaults. Venezuela for decades stored gold that makes up part of its central bank reserves in the vaults of foreign financial institutions including the Bank of England, which provides gold custodian services to developing countries. The bank since 2018 has refused to transfer the funds to Maduro's government, which Britain does not recognize.


Ford made its police SUV heat itself up to more than 133 degrees to kill the coronavirus

Ford made its police SUV heat itself up to more than 133 degrees to kill the coronavirusFord worked with Ohio State and police departments to develop the tech. Ford has a longstanding relationship with law enforcement.


A pharmacist known as 'the Mask Man' has been charged with hoarding $200,000 worth of N95 masks and price-gouging customers

A pharmacist known as 'the Mask Man' has been charged with hoarding $200,000 worth of N95 masks and price-gouging customersThe DOJ said the pharmacist, 66-year-old Richard Schirripa, sold $2,690 of masks to an undercover officer and said he felt "like a drug dealer."


Navy admiral submits results of probe on virus-infected ship

Navy admiral submits results of probe on virus-infected shipThe Navy's top admiral on Wednesday received the results of an internal investigation into the spread of the coronavirus aboard the USS Theodore Roosevelt and the firing of the aircraft carrier's skipper in April. The report is not expected to be made public until decisions are made about potentially restoring Capt. Brett Crozier to command of the Roosevelt or disciplining other officers. It was submitted Wednesday to Adm. Mike Gilday, the chief of naval operations.


Asian shares mixed after Wall Street rally; Hong Kong lower

Asian shares mixed after Wall Street rally; Hong Kong lowerAsian stocks were mixed after an upbeat open on Thursday, as investors pinned their hopes on an economic rebound from the coronavirus crisis. Shares rose in Tokyo, Sydney and Shanghai but dropped in Hong Kong, where tensions are flaring over Beijing’s effort to exert more control over the former British colony. The most recent developments are another thorn in a relationship already testy over China's handling of the early stages of the coronavirus outbreaks and over longstanding trade and other antagonisms.


Here are the likely contenders on Biden's vice president shortlist

Here are the likely contenders on Biden's vice president shortlistWhile Joe Biden has committed to selecting a female running mate, few further details are confirmed. Here's a look at five women in the picture.


Coronavirus infections are rising as states reopen, potentially signaling a second wave

Coronavirus infections are rising as states reopen, potentially signaling a second waveTwenty states reported an increase in new infections during the week ending May 24, up from 13 states the week before.


The Chinese CDC now says the coronavirus didn't jump to people at the Wuhan wet market — instead, it was the site of a super-spreader event

The Chinese CDC now says the coronavirus didn't jump to people at the Wuhan wet market — instead, it was the site of a super-spreader eventThe origin of the new coronavirus still isn't known. But according to the Chinese CDC, it isn't the wet market in Wuhan.


Iran Guards warn US after receiving new combat vessels

Iran Guards warn US after receiving new combat vesselsIran's Revolutionary Guards on Thursday warned the United States against its naval presence in the Gulf as they received 110 new combat vessels. "We announce today that wherever the Americans are, we are right next to them, and they will feel our presence even more in the near future," the Guards' navy chief Rear Admiral Alireza Tangsiri said during a ceremony in southern Iran. Iran and the United States have appeared to be on the brink of an all-out confrontation twice in the past year.


Mexican drug lord pleads poverty in bid to escape arrest

Mexican drug lord pleads poverty in bid to escape arrestDrug lord Rafael Caro Quintero, a notorious underworld figure who is on the FBI’s most wanted list for the murder of a federal agent over three decades ago, said in a legal appeal that he has no money, is too old to work and has no pension. The odd plea was filed Tuesday by Caro Quintero's lawyer seeking an injunction against his arrest or extradition to the United States for the kidnapping and murder of DEA Special Agent Enrique Camarena in Mexico in 1985. The U.S. government says Caro Quintero and his family remain in the drug trade.


Huawei CFO Meng loses key court fight against extradition to United States

Huawei CFO Meng loses key court fight against extradition to United StatesHuawei Technologies Co's Chief Financial Officer Meng Wanzhou was dealt a setback by a Canadian court on Wednesday as she tries to avoid extradition to the United States to face bank fraud charges, dashing hopes for an end to her 18-month house arrest in Vancouver. The ruling, which could further deteriorate relations between Ottawa and Beijing, elicited immediate strong reaction from China's embassy in Canada, which said Canada is "accomplice to United States efforts to bring down Huawei and Chinese high-tech companies."


Five UK mercenaries offered $150,000 each to fly helicopters for Gen Haftar in Libya, say UN

Five UK mercenaries offered $150,000 each to fly helicopters for Gen Haftar in Libya, say UNFive British mercenaries involved in an operation to fly assault helicopters for Libya’s renegade General Khalifa Haftar were offered bounties of up to $150,000 each for their role in the daring plot which went awry. The men, comprised of former Royal Marines and RAF personnel, were among 20 foreign mercenaries who traveled to Libya last June in an operation to pilot assault helicopters and speed boats to intercept Turkish ships ferrying weapons to Haftar’s opponents – the UN-backed government in Tripoli. A source with knowledge of the secret UN report which revealed the plot told The Daily Telegraph that the men involved were believed on sums of “$30,000 to $50,000 a month, or $20,000 to $40,000 per month depending on whether you were pilot or aircrewman”. “It was a three-month contract”. The Telegraph can reveal that the UN investigation concluded that the operation was led by Steven Lodge, a former South African Air Force officer who also served in the British military. Mr. Lodge, who now resides in Scotland, is a director of Umbra Aviation, a South-Africa based company that has recently supplied helicopters to the Government of Mozambique, where the country is battling a jihadist insurgency in its restive north. Speaking to The Telegraph over the phone, Mr. Lodge flatly denied the chronicle of events detailed in the UN report. “All the info is incorrect - the whole facts behind the whole thing,” he said.


'It's a Sad Result.' Mixed Feelings in Hong Kong Over U.S. Announcement on City's Autonomy

'It's a Sad Result.' Mixed Feelings in Hong Kong Over U.S. Announcement on City's AutonomyOne leading pro-democracy figure thanked Washington, others said the move was bad news for Hong Kong people


UConn student wanted in connection to 2 deaths is captured

UConn student wanted in connection to 2 deaths is captured"Peter Manfredonia has been found & is in custody" after a nearly weeklong manhunt, officials said Wednesday.


Amy Klobuchar didn't prosecute officer at center of George Floyd's death after previous conduct complaints

Amy Klobuchar didn't prosecute officer at center of George Floyd's death after previous conduct complaintsGeorge Floyd's death in police custody is renewing criticism of Sen. Amy Klobuchar's (D-Minn.) prosecutorial record.Before she became a senator and a top contender for former Vice President Joe Biden's vice presidential spot, Klobuchar spent eight years as the Hennepin County attorney, in charge of prosecution for Minneapolis. And while in that position, Klobuchar declined to prosecute multiple police officers cited for excessive force, including the officer who kneeled on Floyd's neck as he protested, The Guardian reports.Ex-Minneapolis police officer Derick Chauvin saw at least 10 conduct complaints during his 19-year tenure before he was fired Tuesday, according to a database that documents complaints against police. In particular, he was involved in the shooting death of a man who had stabbed other people before attacking police, as well as some other undisclosed complaints. Klobuchar did not prosecute Chauvin for the first death, and he was later placed on leave when he and other officers shot and wounded a Native American man in 2011.As The Washington Post noted in March, Klobuchar "declined to bring charges in more than two dozen cases in which people were killed in encounters with police" as Hennepin County attorney. Instead, she "aggressively prosecuted smaller offenses" that "have been criticized for their disproportionate effect on poor and minority communities," the Post continues. And as Klobuchar undergoes vetting to become a possible vice presidential candidate, that track record is being scrutinized and criticized once again.More stories from theweek.com Minneapolis official calls for naming 'disease' of racism a public health issue after George Floyd death Trump retweets video declaring 'the only good Democrat is a dead Democrat' Trump signs executive order seeking regulations on social media


Levi’s Is Taking 50% off These Best-Selling Jeans Right Now
One of Trump's favorite pollsters shows his approval plummeting

One of Trump's favorite pollsters shows his approval plummetingPresident Trump’s approval rating has plummeted since late February, according to the Rasmussen daily tracking poll, which the president frequently cited during his first three years in office.


CDC changes its 'confusing' guidelines on coronavirus and surfaces. Here's what we know.

CDC changes its 'confusing' guidelines on coronavirus and surfaces. Here's what we know.This new CDC update may quell some major concerns about how COVID-19 is transmitted, but plenty of questions still remain. Here's what to know.


Warrants describe nightmarish child abuse case in Tennessee

Warrants describe nightmarish child abuse case in TennesseeArrest warrants in a Tennessee couple's abuse case describe a hellish existence for four children in their legal custody, a nightmare that finally ended after a little boy was spotted walking alone along a Roane County road. Michael Anthony Gray Sr., 63, and his wife, Shirley Ann Gray, 60, were arrested Monday on charges of aggravated child abuse, especially aggravated kidnapping, aggravated child neglect and abuse of a corpse, authorities said. The oldest had been locked in the partially flooded, unfinished basement for stealing food shortly after the family moved to the home in June 2016, authorities said, "and had no contact with anyone outside the basement, only given small amounts of food, being white bread and some water,” the warrants state.


So-called honor killing of teen girl sparks outcry in Iran

So-called honor killing of teen girl sparks outcry in IranThe so-called honor killing of a 14-year-old Iranian girl by her dad, who reportedly beheaded her as she slept, has sparked a nationwide outcry.


Iran outraged by 'honour killing' of 14-year-old girl Romina Ashrafi

Iran outraged by 'honour killing' of 14-year-old girl Romina AshrafiThe killing of an Iranian teen by her father after she eloped with an older man sparked outrage on Wednesday, with local media denouncing "institutionalised violence" in "patriarchal" Iran. Iranian media covered the apparent "honour" crime extensively, with Ebtekar newspaper leading its front page with the headline "Unsafe father's house". According to local media, Romina Ashrafi was killed in her sleep on May 21 by her father, who decapitated her in the family home in Talesh in northern Gilan province. The reports said her father had refused her permission to marry a man fifteen years her senior, spurring her to run away, but she was returned home after her father reported her. The legal marriage age in Iran is 13 for women. Iranian media reported that after authorities detained the teenager, she told a judge she feared for her life if she was returned to home. But what most outraged public opinion was the lenient punishment the father is likely to face, Ebtekar wrote. The newspaper notes that Iran's normal "eye for an eye" retributive justice does not apply to fathers who kill their children. Accordingly, he is likely to face three to 10 years in prison, a sentence that could be reduced further, the newspaper wrote, denouncing the "institutionalised violence" of Iran's "patriarchal culture". With the farsi hashtag Romina_Ashrafi focusing outrage on Twitter, President Hassan Rouhani "expressed his regrets" in a cabinet meeting on Wednesday, pleading for the speedy passing of several anti-violence bills, his office said. On Twitter, Vice President for Women and Family Affairs, Masoumeh Ebtekar, said a bill on the protection of young people was in the "final phase" of validation by Iran's Guardian Council. The council, which vets legislation to ensure compliance with Iran's constitution and Islamic sharia law, has thrice previously called for changes to the law after it was passed by lawmakers, Ebtekar newspaper wrote. The publication fears that if the council sends back the bill, it will be buried by Iran's new parliament, which held its first session Wednesday and is dominated by conservatives and hardliners opposed to Rouhani.


Tyson Foods will shut U.S. pork plant as more workers catch COVID-19

Tyson Foods will shut U.S. pork plant as more workers catch COVID-19Tyson Foods Inc said on Thursday it will temporarily close an Iowa pork plant due to the coronavirus pandemic, a month after U.S. President Donald Trump ordered slaughterhouses to stay open to protect the country's food supply. Meat processors like Tyson Foods, WH Group's <0288.HK> Smithfield Foods and JBS USA temporarily closed about 20 slaughterhouses last month as workers fell ill with the new coronavirus, leading to shortages of certain products in grocery stores. An Iowa state official said 555 employees at Tyson's Storm Lake plant tested positive for the virus, about 22% of the workforce.


ICC allows former I.Coast president Gbagbo to leave Belgium

ICC allows former I.Coast president Gbagbo to leave BelgiumThe International Criminal Court on Thursday said former Ivory Coast President Laurent Gbagbo can leave Belgium under certain conditions following his acquittal last year over post-electoral violence that killed 3,000 people. Gbagbo and his deputy Charles Ble Goude were both cleared of crimes against humanity a year ago, eight years after the former West African strongman's arrest and transfer to the Hague-based court. Belgium agreed to host Gbagbo, 73, after he was released in February last year under strict conditions including that he would return to court for a prosecution appeal against his acquittal.


Senate Democrats take on GOP court-packing in blistering new report

Senate Democrats take on GOP court-packing in blistering new reportThe senators pointed to conservative activist Leonard Leo as the driving force behind the many of the president's appointments.


Pakistani villager urges India to return 'spy' pigeon

Pakistani villager urges India to return 'spy' pigeonThe owner of a pigeon "arrested" by India for spying says his bird was freed for Eid and is innocent.


Biden points out he was warning about pandemic unpreparedness in October while Trump tweeted about iPhones

Biden points out he was warning about pandemic unpreparedness in October while Trump tweeted about iPhonesFormer Vice President Joe Biden has a humble brag he'd like to share.In October 2019, months before the coronavirus outbreak began, Biden tweeted a warning to the United States, saying "We are not prepared for a pandemic." Biden then called out President Trump for rolling back measures the Obama administration took, likely referring to Trump's 2018 disbandment of the team directly responsible for handling a pandemic response.As Biden's Twitter account conveniently pointed out Thursday, while Biden was urging caution, Trump was tweeting about iPhones. Specifically, the president took issue with the button-less feature in iPhone models released in 2017 onward.> Two tweets from the same day in October. pic.twitter.com/rsSslLCsTW> > — Joe Biden (@JoeBiden) May 28, 2020In fairness to Trump, this was months before the first COVID-19 case had even been reported, and just one month after the newest iPhone model had been released. And we do miss those buttons.More stories from theweek.com Amy Klobuchar didn't prosecute officer at center of George Floyd's death after previous conduct complaints Minnesota governor activates National Guard as protests continue over death of George Floyd Trump retweets video declaring 'the only good Democrat is a dead Democrat'


Pharma chiefs see coronavirus vaccine by year-end, but challenges 'daunting'

Pharma chiefs see coronavirus vaccine by year-end, but challenges 'daunting'Pharmaceutical company executives said Thursday that one or several COVID-19 vaccines could begin rolling out before 2021, but warned the challenges would be "daunting" as it was estimated that 15 billion doses would be needed to halt the pandemic. Well over 100 labs around the world are scrambling to come up with a vaccine against the novel coronavirus, including 10 that have made it to the clinical trial stage. "The hope of many people is that we will have a vaccine, hopefully several, by the end of this year," Pascal Soriot, head of AstraZeneca, told a virtual briefing.


Minneapolis Man: Cop Who Kneeled on George Floyd ‘Tried to Kill Me’ in 2008

Minneapolis Man: Cop Who Kneeled on George Floyd ‘Tried to Kill Me’ in 2008Ira Latrell Toles didn’t immediately recognize Minneapolis cop Derek Chauvin in the now-viral video of him holding his knee on George Floyd’s neck as the handcuffed black man repeatedly told him he couldn’t breathe.But when news outlets identified the officers involved, Toles, 33, realized the man responsible for Floyd’s death was the same police officer who barged into his home and beat him up in the bathroom before shooting him in the stomach 12 years earlier while responding to a domestic violence call. “The officer that killed that guy might be the one that shot me,” Toles texted his sister on Tuesday night, according to messages shared with The Daily Beast. “They said his last name and I think it was him.”“It’s him,” his sister instantly replied.On Tuesday, Chauvin was one of four officers fired for his involvement in Floyd’s death, which has sparked protests across the country and calls for a federal hate-crime investigation. Local outlets reported that Chauvin was the officer who knelt on Floyd’s neck for several minutes—as the 46-year-old pleaded, “I’m about to die.” Floyd had no pulse when he was finally put into an ambulance.‘Burn It Down. Let Them Pay’: Deadly Chaos Erupts in Minneapolis as Fires Rage Over Police ViolenceMinneapolis Mayor Jacob Frey on Wednesday called for Hennepin County Attorney Mike Freeman to arrest and charge Chauvin with Floyd’s death. “Why is the man who killed George Floyd not in jail? If you had done it, or I had done it, we would be behind bars right now,” Frey said in a news conference.Toles believes that Floyd’s horrific death could have been prevented if Chauvin was properly punished for his violent arrest in May 2008. He said that while he pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor charge—and still suffers pain from the bullet hole in his lower stomach—Chauvin continued his career at the Minneapolis Police Department with nothing more than a slap on the wrist.“If he was reprimanded when he shot me, George Floyd would still be alive,” the IT professional said. Authorities said that just before 2 a.m on May 24, 2008, officers responded to a domestic violence call at an apartment complex on Columbus Ave South. The 911 operator could hear a woman yelling for somebody to stop hitting her, local media reported at the time. Toles, who was then 21, admits that the mother of his child called the cops on him that night, but he was surprised when several officers showed up without announcing themselves. “When I saw that he breached the front door, I ran in the bathroom,” Toles told The Daily Beast. “Then [Chauvin] starts kicking in that door. I was in the bathroom with a cigarette and no lighter.”The 33-year-old said that Chauvin broke into the bathroom and started to hit him without warning. Toles said he returned blows to the officer because “my natural reaction to someone hitting me is to stop them from hitting me.” “All I could do is assume it was the police because they didn’t announce themselves or ever give me a command,” he said. “I didn’t know what to think when he started hitting me. I swear he was hitting me with the gun.”According to local news reports, Chauvin shot and wounded Toles after he allegedly reached for an officer’s gun. Toles said he doesn’t remember being shot—just “being walked through the apartment until I collapsed in the main entrance where I was left to bleed until the paramedics came.” “I remember my baby mother screaming and crying also,” he added.Toles was taken to Hennepin County Medical Center, where he said he stayed for about three days. There, he learned Chauvin had shot him at such close range that the bullet went through his groin and came out his left butt cheek before hitting the bathroom wall. The wound, he said, left a hole that “never really closed” and is so large he can still stick a finger inside. Once he was released from the hospital, Toles said he was taken directly to court, where he was charged with two felony counts of obstructing legal process or arrest and a misdemeanor count of domestic assault. “I would assume my reaction would be to try to stop him from hitting me. If his first reaction was hitting me in the face that means I can’t see and I’m too disoriented to first locate his gun and then try to take it from him and for what?” Toles said. “To turn a misdemeanor disorderly situation into a felony situation that could have resulted in me dying? He tried to kill me in that bathroom.” Toles said he only spent a day or two in jail—where he was denied pain pills—for the charges before he was released. Three months later, he said he pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor charge as part of a deal.Chauvin and the other officers involved were put on paid administrative leave pending an investigation into the shooting—a standard procedure for the Minneapolis Police Department—but were later placed back into the field. “I knew he would do something again,” Toles said. “I wish we had smartphones back then.”The Minneapolis Police Department did not immediately respond to The Daily Beast’s request for comment. Chauvin, 44, is one of four officers who responded to a suspected “forgery in process” on Monday night—along with Thomas Lane, J Alexander Kueng, and Tou Thao.In the gut-wrenching, 10-minute video recorded by a bystander, Chauvin is seen pressing his knee on Floyd’s neck while Thao stands guard, trying to keep upset bystanders at bay. “Please, please, please, I can’t breathe. Please, man,” Floyd says in the footage that does not show the beginning of the arrest. “I’m about to die,” he says. A Minneapolis Fire Department report said Floyd did not have a pulse when he was loaded into an ambulance. He was pronounced dead at a nearby hospital shortly after in what police described as a “medical incident.”“We are looking and demanding that these officers be arrested and charged with the murder of George Floyd,” Ben Crump, a civil rights attorney representing the 46-year-old’s family, told The Daily Beast on Thursday. “My hope is that there will be effective and courageous leadership that will speak to the value of George Floyd’s life as an example to the world that black lives matter. It’s time for a change in Minneapolis.”Chauvin, who joined the force in 2001, has also been involved in several other police-involved shootings throughout his career. According to Communities United Against Police Brutality, 10 complaints have been filed against the now-former police officer—but Chauvin only ever received two verbal reprimands.In 2006, Chauvin was involved in the fatal shooting of 42-year-old Wayne Reyes, who allegedly stabbed two people before reportedly turning a gun on police. Chauvin was among six officers to respond to the stabbing. A year prior, Chauvin and another officer were also chasing a car that then hit and killed three people, according to Communities United Against Police Brutality.In 2011, the officer was also one of five officers placed on a standard three-day leave after the non-fatal shooting of a Native American man. The officers returned to work after the department determined that they had acted “appropriately.”The city’s Civilian Review Authority, which lists complaints prior to September 2012, shows five more complaints against Chauvin, which were closed without discipline. A prisoner at a Minnesota correctional facility sued Chauvin and seven other officers for “alleged violations of his federal constitutional rights” in 2006, although the case was dismissed and the details were not clear.Toles said that while he has not protested himself, he believes this horrific incident is a watershed moment for the Minneapolis Police Department—an agency that he says has become the butt of a joke in the black community.“We joke about it in the black community but we know that a white person calling the cops on us is gonna go in their favor,” he said. The 33-year-old added that while he believes Floyd's death will finally bring change and reform that is necessary for Minneapolis, it’s outraged residents who will ensure that justice is finally seen. He added that while he never filed a complaint in 2008, he is now looking to sue the Minneapolis Police Department for the violent incident. “We’ve all reached our tipping point. Water boils at 212 degrees,” he said. “We’re at 600.”Read more at The Daily Beast.Got a tip? Send it to The Daily Beast hereGet our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


Cockpit voice recorder of crashed Pakistani plane recovered

Cockpit voice recorder of crashed Pakistani plane recoveredThe cockpit voice recorder of the Pakistani airliner that crashed last week was found on Thursday, six days after the passenger plane went down in a crowded neighborhood near the airport in the city of Karachi, killing 97 people on board. The other part of the black box, a flight data recorder, was recovered within hours of the crash. There were only two survivors of the Airbus A320 crash, which was carrying 91 passengers and eight crew members.


Outrage in Iran over gruesome 'honour killing' of teenage girl

Outrage in Iran over gruesome 'honour killing' of teenage girlIran’s president has called for so-called honour killings to be outlawed following the gruesome murder of a teenage girl, allegedly by her father, for running away from home with an older man. Romina Ashrafi, 14, was allegedly beheaded by her father as punishment for fleeing her home in Talesh, near Tehran, with a 29-year-old man. The couple were detained and Romina was handed back to her family as her father appeared to have forgiven her, according to the state news agency IRNA. But on May 21, the girl’s father attacked her while she was sleeping and cut off her head with a sickle, according to a local news website called Gilkhabar. The father has since been arrested, as well as the man Romina eloped with according to local media reports. Under Iranian law, young girls can marry from 13 although most women get married in their early 20s according to the Associated Press. If convicted, the girl’s father would face a prison sentence of ten years. Iran’s penal code currently reduces the penalties for fathers, or other family members, who carry out honour killings on their relatives. Romina’s death has shocked Iran and prompted Hassan Rouhani, the president, to order his Cabinet to speed up legislation against so-called honour killings.


This Neo-Futuristic Home Found Its Inspiration in the British Countryside
Venezuela's Maduro vows to raise gasoline price as Iranian tanker nears

Venezuela's Maduro vows to raise gasoline price as Iranian tanker nearsVenezuelan President Nicolas Maduro on Wednesday pledged to begin charging citizens for gasoline, as the fourth cargo of a five-tanker flotilla bringing fuel from Iran approached the South American nation's exclusive economic zone. Iran is providing the country with up to 1.53 million barrels of gasoline and components to help it ease an acute scarcity that has forced Venezuelans to wait in hours-long lines at service stations or pay steep prices on the black market. With the arrival of the gasoline, Maduro said he would end the policy of providing fuel effectively for free after more than two decades of frozen pump prices.


Russia slams 'dangerous' US foreign policy moves

Russia slams 'dangerous' US foreign policy movesRussia said on Thursday the United States was acting in a dngerous and unpredictable way, after Washington withdrew from a key military treaty and moved to ramp up pressure on Iran. Foreign ministry spokeswoman Maria Zakharova made the comments after Washington announced it would end sanctions waivers for nations that remain in a nuclear accord signed with Iran.


Rohingya refugee crisis: 'The bodies were thrown out of the boat'

Rohingya refugee crisis: 'The bodies were thrown out of the boat'Khadiza Begum, a Rohingya refugee, left Myanmar to escape violence but found more horror at sea.


Republican Sen. Chuck Grassley: Trump has failed to justify ouster of watchdogs, fueling political speculation

Republican Sen. Chuck Grassley: Trump has failed to justify ouster of watchdogs, fueling political speculationThe unusual rebuke from Iowa Republican Sen. Chuck Grassley comes amid scrutiny of Trump's decision to fire the State Department's inspector general.


WH press secretary: Trump says he’s feeling ‘absolutely great’ after taking hydroxychloroquine

WH press secretary: Trump says he’s feeling ‘absolutely great’ after taking hydroxychloroquineAt a press briefing on Thursday, White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany told reporters President Trump said he’s feeling “absolutely great” after completing his treatment with the malaria drug hydroxychloroquine as a preventive measure against the coronavirus. In April, the FDA cautioned against using the drug to treat COVID-19 outside of a hospital setting or clinical trial.


Double murder suspect arrested after multistate manhunt

Double murder suspect arrested after multistate manhuntThe manhunt for the 23-year-old college senior had spanned Connecticut, New Jersey, Pennsylvania and Maryland.


NASA and SpaceX's launch was postponed, but at least we got to see their wildly corny spacesuits

NASA and SpaceX's launch was postponed, but at least we got to see their wildly corny spacesuitsThe much-heralded joint launch between NASA and Elon Musk's SpaceX was postponed on Wednesday due to light rain in Florida. It was a disappointing anticlimax for the first manned space launch from American soil since 2011 — all systems were "go" just an hour before astronauts Robert Behnken and Douglas Hurley were scheduled for 4:33 p.m. liftoff — but there was a silver lining to the clouds above Cape Canaveral: the world got to see, for the first time, NASA and SpaceX's alarmingly cheesy spacesuits, which looked something like man-sized Mentos dispensers topped off with garden galoshes.While many on Twitter hailed the gear as looking "soo cool" and "so f—ing dope," the correct reaction came from one commenter who said the suits "make [the astronauts] look like stunt extras in a low budget space movie." Whether or not Behnken and Hurley find themselves menaced by rubbery Venus ghouls in some misbegotten Roger Corman epic, the suits might lead to an even graver danger: not being able to extract their heads from the two-sizes-too small helmets that Musk looks to have grabbed from his local Spirit Halloween.If the spacemen are fortunate enough to somehow wrench the helmets from their skulls, NASA and SpaceX will give it another go on either Saturday or Sunday — probably not enough time to raid NASA's old closets for some real spacesuits.More stories from theweek.com Amy Klobuchar didn't prosecute officer at center of George Floyd's death after previous conduct complaints Minnesota governor activates National Guard as protests continue over death of George Floyd Trump retweets video declaring 'the only good Democrat is a dead Democrat'


Gang of 26 arrested for allegedly smuggling people from Vietnam to Europe in investigation prompted by Essex lorry deaths

Gang of 26 arrested for allegedly smuggling people from Vietnam to Europe in investigation prompted by Essex lorry deathsA gang of 26 suspected people smugglers have been arrested in France and Belgium in an investigation prompted by the deaths of 39 Vietnamese migrants found in the back of a lorry in Essex last year. The early morning raids took place in Paris and Brussels, with 13 people detained in each country. In Belgium, 11 Vietnamese and two Moroccans were held, while in France, authorities said the suspects were “mostly Vietnamese and French”. The suspects are allegedly part of an organised crime group that smuggles refugees from Asia, particularly from Vietnam, and that likely has transported up to several dozen people every day for several months, Europol said in a statement. “Prompted by the discovery of 39 deceased Vietnamese nationals inside a refrigerated trailer in Essex in the United Kingdom in October 2019, a joint investigation team (JIT) was created between Belgium, Ireland, France, the United Kingdom, Eurojust and Europol,” Europol said.


'100,000 people died, Joe, and all you did was try to help your friend the president': CNBC's Andrew Ross Sorkin unloaded on fellow anchor Joe Kernen over the severity of coronavirus

'100,000 people died, Joe, and all you did was try to help your friend the president': CNBC's Andrew Ross Sorkin unloaded on fellow anchor Joe Kernen over the severity of coronavirusThe exchange between the CNBC hosts lasted around a minute as they lobbed accusations at each other.


Failed Maduro coup leader flew on pro-govt magnate's plane

Failed Maduro coup leader flew on pro-govt magnate's planeIt was mid-January and Jordan Goudreau was itching to get going on a secret plan to raid Venezuela and arrest President Nicolás Maduro when the former special forces commando flew to the city of Barranquilla in Colombia to meet with his would-be partner in arms. To get there, Goudreau and two former Green Beret buddies relied on some unusual help: a chartered flight out of Miami’s Opa Locka executive airport on a plane owned by a Venezuelan businessman so close to the government of Hugo Chávez that he spent almost 4 years in a U.S. prison for trying to cover up clandestine cash payments to its allies. The owner of the Venezuela-registered Cessna Citation II with yellow and blue lines, identified with the tail number YV-3231, was Franklin Durán, according to three people familiar with the businessman’s movements who spoke on the condition of anonymity for fear of retaliation.


Turkey's Erdogan says many facilities to reopen on June 1

Turkey's Erdogan says many facilities to reopen on June 1Turkey will lift restrictions on intercity travel and allow restaurants, cafes, parks and sports facilities to reopen from June 1 as it eases restrictions imposed to curb the coronavirus outbreak, President Tayyip Erdogan said on Thursday. Restrictions will remain in place on the movements of those aged over 65 and under 18. The virus has killed nearly 4,500 people in Turkey, with more than 160,000 infections.


Study: Death Rates for Drivers Vary by Car Size

Study: Death Rates for Drivers Vary by Car SizeWhen it comes to vehicle crashes, size and weight matter a great deal. That’s the conclusion of a comprehensive, three-year study into how drivers fared in their vehicles over time by the Insuran...


Coronavirus: How the pandemic in US compares with rest of world

Coronavirus: How the pandemic in US compares with rest of worldMore than 100,000 people have died and the country is now slowly reopening amid fears of new spikes.


China passes draft Hong Kong security law, sparking fear and anger

China passes draft Hong Kong security law, sparking fear and anger"Hong Kong, in many ways, has become the new Berlin: the new meeting point of a big argument of big disagreement between two major powers."


Bills You Don't Have to Pay During the Coronavirus Pandemic
Protester who hung effigy of Kentucky Gov. Andy Beshear fired from job at car dealership

Protester who hung effigy of Kentucky Gov. Andy Beshear fired from job at car dealershipTerry Bush, president of the Kentucky 3 Percenters group, only hoisted the effigy, his wife Patsy said Wednesday morning.


George Floyd death: AOC says politicians scared of ‘political power of police’ as she and Ilhan Omar call for officer to be charged with murder

George Floyd death: AOC says politicians scared of ‘political power of police’ as she and Ilhan Omar call for officer to be charged with murderDemocratic congresswomen Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Ilhan Omar have called for the police officer who knelt on George Floyd‘s neck to be charged with murder, as the former claims politicians are scared of “the political power of police.”On Monday, four police officers in Minneapolis were fired after footage emerged of one of them kneeling on the neck of Mr Floyd, a black man, who repeatedly shouted that he couldn’t breathe.


Britain shuts embassy in North Korea after extreme lockdown

Britain shuts embassy in North Korea after extreme lockdownBritain has closed its embassy in the North Korean capital of Pyongyang and ordered its staff to leave the country. The surprise closure is linked to coronavirus-related restrictions in place since earlier this year, which the Foreign Office said had left it unable to "rotate our staff and sustain the operation of the Embassy". It follows a similar evacuation of a number of other diplomats and foreign residents from the North Korean capital in March. A number of sources told the US news website NK News on Wednesday that the British diplomats left North Korea by land, crossing the DPRK’s border with China earlier on Wednesday. Flights out of the country remain grounded. Hundreds of foreign residents remain in Pyongyang, including diplomats from the Swedish and Russian embassies and a small number of aid workers, though absent representatives from Germany, Switzerland, France, and Italy. There are currently no British residents in the country. Resident diplomats had previously raised their concerns about the severity of the DPRK authorities’ coronavirus-prevention rules, which saw the country close its borders and place them under effective house arrest for over a month earlier in the year.


Tesla slashes prices to boost demand

Tesla slashes prices to boost demandTesla Inc. has cut prices of its electric vehicles by as much as 6% in North America following a decline in auto demand in the region during weeks of lockdown that have now started to ease.


English court to weigh recognition of Maduro, Guaido in Venezuela gold case

English court to weigh recognition of Maduro, Guaido in Venezuela gold caseAn English court on Thursday said it would need to decide which of Venezuela's dueling political factions to recognize before ruling on President Nicolas Maduro's request for the Bank of England to hand over gold the country has in its vaults. Venezuela for decades stored gold that makes up part of its central bank reserves in the vaults of foreign financial institutions including the Bank of England, which provides gold custodian services to developing countries. The bank since 2018 has refused to transfer the funds to Maduro's government, which Britain does not recognize.


Ford made its police SUV heat itself up to more than 133 degrees to kill the coronavirus

Ford made its police SUV heat itself up to more than 133 degrees to kill the coronavirusFord worked with Ohio State and police departments to develop the tech. Ford has a longstanding relationship with law enforcement.


A pharmacist known as 'the Mask Man' has been charged with hoarding $200,000 worth of N95 masks and price-gouging customers

A pharmacist known as 'the Mask Man' has been charged with hoarding $200,000 worth of N95 masks and price-gouging customersThe DOJ said the pharmacist, 66-year-old Richard Schirripa, sold $2,690 of masks to an undercover officer and said he felt "like a drug dealer."


Navy admiral submits results of probe on virus-infected ship

Navy admiral submits results of probe on virus-infected shipThe Navy's top admiral on Wednesday received the results of an internal investigation into the spread of the coronavirus aboard the USS Theodore Roosevelt and the firing of the aircraft carrier's skipper in April. The report is not expected to be made public until decisions are made about potentially restoring Capt. Brett Crozier to command of the Roosevelt or disciplining other officers. It was submitted Wednesday to Adm. Mike Gilday, the chief of naval operations.


Asian shares mixed after Wall Street rally; Hong Kong lower

Asian shares mixed after Wall Street rally; Hong Kong lowerAsian stocks were mixed after an upbeat open on Thursday, as investors pinned their hopes on an economic rebound from the coronavirus crisis. Shares rose in Tokyo, Sydney and Shanghai but dropped in Hong Kong, where tensions are flaring over Beijing’s effort to exert more control over the former British colony. The most recent developments are another thorn in a relationship already testy over China's handling of the early stages of the coronavirus outbreaks and over longstanding trade and other antagonisms.