N. Korea tests new 'super-large' multiple rocket launcher

N. Korea tests new 'super-large' multiple rocket launcherNorth Korea said Sunday leader Kim Jong Un supervised the test-firing of a "newly developed super-large multiple rocket launcher," another demonstration of its expanding weapons arsenal apparently aimed at increasing its leverage ahead of a possible resumption of nuclear talks with the U.S. Kim underscored the need to "continue to step up the development of Korean-style strategic and tactical weapons for resolutely frustrating the ever-mounting military threats and pressure offensive of the hostile forces," according to the KCNA. The "hostile forces" likely referred to the United States and South Korea, whose recently ended regular military drills infuriated North Korea.


Ex-wife, children of Atlanta surgeon Christopher Edwards found dead in apparent murder-suicide

Ex-wife, children of Atlanta surgeon Christopher Edwards found dead in apparent murder-suicideAuthorities say they believe Marsha Edwards shot Christopher Edwards Jr. and Erin Edwards before turning the gun on herself.


Police are trying to arrest their way out of a mass shooting epidemic, and experts warn that law enforcement can't shoulder the entire burden

Police are trying to arrest their way out of a mass shooting epidemic, and experts warn that law enforcement can't shoulder the entire burdenThe arrests won't fully or permanently stop a person determined to inflict mass death — and the US is nowhere near close to tackling the root causes.


UK Hong Kong consulate worker Simon Cheng freed after detention in mainland China

UK Hong Kong consulate worker Simon Cheng freed after detention in mainland ChinaA British consulate employee in Hong Kong has been freed by China after being detained for 15 days on the mainland amid rising tensions between the former British colony and Beijing. Simon Cheng, 28, a trade and investment officer at the Hong Kong consulate’s Scottish Development International section, went missing on August 8 on his way back from a work trip in Shenzhen, a neighbouring Chinese city.  It was not until after the UK expressed “extreme concern” about his disappearance that China’s foreign ministry broke its silence, confirming Mr Cheng had been detained without releasing further details.  On Saturday, his family announced that he had come back. "Simon has returned to Hong Kong; thanks you everyone for your support! Simon and his family wish to have some time to rest and recover, and will not take any interview,” they said in a statement.   An activist holds an illustration of Simon Cheng during a gathering outside the British Consulate-General building in Hong Kong  Credit: AFP Chinese police in Shenzhen confirmed that Mr Cheng had been detained for violating public security management regulations, and was released after that period on Saturday.  Police also said he had “confessed to the facts of his illegal activity,” without saying what those activities were. Mr Cheng was not formally charged or tried in court, and his family rejected allegations in Chinese state media that he had been detained for visiting prostitutes.  On Friday the UK issued a warning to all travellers to Hong Kong about increased scrutiny from mainland authorities at border crossings. The warning added that mobile phones and electronic devices were being checked by border patrol. Mr Cheng’s mysterious disappearance highlights China’s murky legal and judicial system – something that help kicked off mass protests early June in Hong Kong. Many fear freedoms enjoyed in Hong Kong, guaranteed for at least 50 years under an agreement that became effective when the former British colony was returned to Beijing, are fast-disappearing under China’s ruling Communist Party.  Hong Kong crisis | Comment and analysis Millions first took to the streets against a now-suspended extradition proposal that would have sent people to face trial in mainland China, where Communist Party control of the courts contributes to a 99.9 per cent conviction rate. Forced confessions are also common with suspects paraded on state television. “What happened to Simong Cheng – this is a common tactic used by the central government to put pressure on people,” said Kammy Yang, 50, an office clerk at a protest on Saturday. “Many Chinese activists were accused of prostitution or tax scams; this is their strategy in China, trying to suppress freedom.” Thousands of protesters on Saturday engaged in a series of skirmishes, throwing projectiles from bricks to petrol bombs at police who responded with sprays of tear gas and rubber bullets. It was the first time tear gas had been deployed in 10 days, a period of relative calm as protesters recalibrated their approach in an otherwise tumultuous, violent summer.  Demonstrators join hands to form a human chain during the Hong Kong Way event in the Central district of Hong Kong, China, on Friday Credit: Bloomberg “The reasons why protesters are building roadblocks, surrounding police stations, and throwing bricks – it’s because the government doesn’t respond to us,” said Vaso Chan, 28, an office clerk. “It’s not fun for any of us to come out during summer break.” Protesters spray painted slogans like “Give me liberty or death,” Chinazi,” and “HK popo Gestapo,” on sidewalks and highways. As the political movement has grown, so have protesters’ demands, who are now calling for an independent inquiry into police handling of the protests, the resignation of Hong Kong chief executive Carrie Lam, and direct leadership elections.  City leaders however have made no concessions, instead thrusting the police to the front lines to handle the situation, further angering protesters.  Demonstrations are occurring nearly every day now in the financial hub, disrupting traffic and public transportation. On Saturday, several stations closed along a planned march route. But despite growing unrest, public support for the protesters has stayed strong, with marches and strikes planned through September. “No matter whether those protesters are peaceful protesters or protesters that are standing in the ‘front lines’, no matter what they do, we will support them,” said Mr Chan.


VIDEO: 2 trans women, gay man ejected from DTLA bar after alleged altercation with other group

VIDEO: 2 trans women, gay man ejected from DTLA bar after alleged altercation with other groupTwo transgender women who were forcibly removed from a downtown L.A. bar say security guards used excessive force after they were allegedly verbally attacked with transphobic slurs.


20 of the Craziest Pickup Trucks Ever

20 of the Craziest Pickup Trucks Ever


Trump claim doctors treating mass shooting victims 'were coming out of operating rooms' to meet him dismissed by hospitals

Trump claim doctors treating mass shooting victims 'were coming out of operating rooms' to meet him dismissed by hospitalsTwo hospitals have denied Donald Trump’s claim doctors “were coming out of operating rooms” to meet him when he travelled to Texas and Ohio to console victims of two mass shootings."At no time did, or would, physicians or staff leave active operating rooms during the presidential visit,” University Medical Center (UMC) spokesperson Ryan Mielke told local TV station KVIA. “Our priority is always patient care."


Journalist killed in Mexico

Journalist killed in MexicoThe head of a Mexican news website was found stabbed to death in the center of the country, authorities said Saturday, the 10th such killing this year. The body of Nevith Condes Jaramillo "was found Saturday morning... showing injuries from a sharp object," the state prosecutor said in a statement. Condes Jaramillo, 42, was the head of a local news site in Tejupilco and was also an announcer on a community radio station.


Russia's Chechnya inaugurates what it says is Europe's largest mosque

Russia's Chechnya inaugurates what it says is Europe's largest mosqueAuthorities in the Russian region of Chechnya on Friday inaugurated what they said was the largest mosque in Europe in a pomp-filled ceremony attended by local and foreign officials. Named after the Prophet Mohammed, the marble-decorated mosque has capacity for more than 30,000 people and has been described by the Chechen authorities as the "largest and most beautiful" mosque in Europe. Chechen leader Ramzan Kadyrov, an ally of President Vladimir Putin, said the mosque -- located in Shali, a town of 54,000 just outside the regional capital Grozny -- was "unique in its design, and majestic in its size and beauty".


The Latest: Harris gets warm welcome at California meeting

The Latest: Harris gets warm welcome at California meetingCalifornia Sen. Kamala Harris is getting a rousing hometown welcome at the Democratic National Committee summer meeting in San Francisco. Harris is looking to California as a potentially key part of her path to the Democratic presidential nomination. With scores of supporters in the gallery Friday, Harris harkened back to her first political race for district attorney.


A man was training to get a gun permit. The instructor accidentally shot him, police say

A man was training to get a gun permit. The instructor accidentally shot him, police sayThe instructor, a Riverside County Sheriff's Department trainer, accidentally shot a student attending the class to get a concealed weapons permit.


A man with schizophrenia was found guilty of murdering a Saint Augustine's University student in 1979. 40 years later, a panel of judges decided he's innocent after all.

A man with schizophrenia was found guilty of murdering a Saint Augustine's University student in 1979. 40 years later, a panel of judges decided he's innocent after all.Blackmon's lawyers argued he was tricked by police and prosecutors into falsely confessing to a crime he didn't commit.


A floating nuclear plant in Russia features a gym, bar, and pool. An expert calls it 'Chernobyl on ice.'

A floating nuclear plant in Russia features a gym, bar, and pool. An expert calls it 'Chernobyl on ice.'Environmental activists worry about the perils of placing nuclear reactors at sea, where they could be vulnerable to climate-related disasters.


Metal detectorist finds £10,000 gold ring in garage 40 years after discarding it as worthless

Metal detectorist finds £10,000 gold ring in garage 40 years after discarding it as worthlessA metal detectorist who discarded a gold ring in his garage for 40 years after a museum told him it was worthless has discovered its real value is £10,000. Tom Clark, 81, dug up the buried treasure while scanning an area of farmland near Aylesbury, Buckinghamshire, in 1979, then put it inside a metal tin and forgot about it. But the retired leather craftsman came across the rare seal ring eight years ago while sorting through items from his mother's house after she passed away. He got the item valued and was astonished to discover that it was actually a 670-year-old medieval artefact dating back to 1350. It is due to be auctioned off in Derbyshire on Tuesday (Aug 27) and is expected to sell for between £8,500 and £10,000. The turn of events is similar to the plot of BBC sitcom Only Fools and Horses, when brothers Del and Rodney come across a watch in their garage which is then auctioned off for millions of pounds. Mr Clark said: "I had completely forgotten about it. At the time I'd only been metal detecting for 10 years and didn't realise the ring was anything special. It was all twisted and broken when I dug it up." He took the rare ring along with some others to a museum to have them valued at the time, but was told they were all fairly modern. "I put them all in a tin and left them in the garage at my mother's house," he said. "A few months ago, I was sorting through some stuff in my own garage that had come from my mother's house and there it was - the tin with the rings in it." Tom is auctioning off the ring, which is expected to make between £8,500 and £10,000 Credit: Hansons / SWNS/Hansons / SWNS Mr Clark, now a much more experienced collector, said he instantly knew it was a seal ring dating back to the 1300s and would have belonged to someone important given its decoration and quality. He added: "It's rare and elegant. I'd love to know who it belonged to." A Latin inscription on the ring translates as 'I hide the true message'. Mark Becher, Historica expert at auctioneer Hansons, said: "It's a fascinating piece of medieval jewellery and I'm delighted Tom rediscovered again after all these years."


Police Arrest 29 as Protesters Cause Damage: Hong Kong Update

Police Arrest 29 as Protesters Cause Damage: Hong Kong Update(Bloomberg) -- Hong Kong police fired tear gas and arrested 29 people on Saturday after protesters occupied roads, set up barricades and hurled projectiles in the 12th week of unrest in the Asian financial center.At least two more rallies were taking place on Sunday, including one organized by relatives of police officers, who have been criticized for using excessive force to quell protests. Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam held a meeting on Saturday with former officials and other prominent people to find a way out of the impasse that has rocked the former British colony.Demonstrators are looking to maintain momentum after large but peaceful protests last weekend temporarily broke a pattern of tear gas and police clashes. They formed a human chain across the city on Friday, while a plan to disrupt airport transportation services on Saturday wasn’t successful. Historic mass marches opposing legislation easing extraditions to China began peacefully in June, and have since widened into a broader movement against Beijing’s increasing grip.Key Developments:Police arrested more than two dozen protesters on SaturdayChief Executive Lam seeks to build a dialogue platform to address roots of discontentU.K. consulate staffer Simon Cheng was released by China on Saturday after more than two weeks of detentionHere’s the latest:Rain march (Sunday 2 p.m.)People took cover from the persistent rain and filled the stands and pitch of the Kwai Chung sports stadium, the starting point for Sunday’s rally. The march from the stadium was granted late-night approval after organizers appealed an earlier objection by authorities.“The rainy weather is good for the protesters but it’s bad for the police, who are wearing heavy gear. It also makes their tear gas ineffective,” said Gloria Mak, a 25-year-old assistant to a Japanese company.Train service suspended (Sunday 11.30 a.m.)MTR Corp., operator of Hong Kong’s rail network, suspended train service to stations near the planned Tsuen Wan march. The company said in a statement that the Kwai Fong, Tsuen Wan and Tai Wo Hau stations would be closed from 1.30 p.m. until further notice.On Saturday, MTR suspended service on parts of its Kwun Tong line because of protests in the area.Operations Director Adi Lau Tin-shing said the current situation was the company’s biggest challenge in its 40 years of operation and that the station closures were an unavoidable decision taken on the grounds of safety.Police condemn ‘radical’ behavior (Sunday, 3:02 a.m.)Police said “radical protesters” in Saturday’s clashes used electric saws to damage a number of smart lampposts, and hurled hard objects, bricks and petrol bombs at officers. They arrested 19 men and 10 women, aged between 17 and 52, for offenses including the possession of offensive weapons and assaulting police officers, the police said in a statement.Bricks and bamboo poles (Saturday 4:20 p.m.)Police fired tear gas to break up demonstrators blocking a road in the Kwung Tong area. Protesters were seen breaking bricks into smaller pieces and using bamboo poles to keep police from getting close to a barricade they erected. Elsewhere, video footage showed a so-called smart lamppost that was toppled and notes declaring “no totalitarian surveillance” were pasted on it.Protesters split up from the authorized march route and some regathered in the neighborhood of Wong Tai Sin, the scene of clashes earlier this month. Police fired tear gas and made arrests after the demonstrators blocked off roads and disrupted traffic.Lam seeks dialogue platform (Saturday 3:10 p.m.)About 30 people were invited to the meeting organized by Lam in Government House, including ex-transport chief Anthony Cheung and Cardinal John Tong, the former bishop of Hong Kong, RTHK reported. Lam said the meeting was not a “dialogue platform” but a gathering to share ideas on how to build dialogue.“I do not expect dialogue to easily resolve the deadlock, stop demonstrations, or to provide solutions to problems,” she said in a Facebook post. “But continuing to fight is not the way out.”Cathay issues warning (3.30 p.m.)Cathay Pacific Airways Ltd. said it will not tolerate employees supporting or taking part in illegal protests ahead of “planned activities” by the Hong Kong Confederation of Trade Unions on Aug. 26.The Airport Authority Hong Kong obtained a High Court order to extend an interim injunction granted on Aug. 13 banning protesters from unlawfully obstructing access to the airport. That injunction covers Cathay City, “which is the operational hub for our global operations and as such includes facilities that are absolutely critical to our flight operations,” Cathay said in Saturday’s statement.Operations at the city’s airport were disrupted earlier this month when protesters occupied the building.U.K. Consulate Staffer Freed (10:39 a.m.)Chinese police released a U.K. consulate staffer from Hong Kong after more than two weeks in detention. Simon Cheng was set free on Saturday after he was held for violating the Public Security Administration Punishment Law, police in the southern Chinese city of Shenzhen said in a post on the Weibo social media platform. He failed to return home to Hong Kong from an Aug. 8 meeting in Shenzhen.Upcoming ScheduleThe weekend concludes with Sunday protests in the Tsuen Wan and Kwai Chung areas, starting mid-afternoon. Relatives of police also plan a march to the official residence of Chief Executive Lam in support of local law enforcement.\--With assistance from Justin Chin, Sheryl Tian Tong Lee and Venus Feng.To contact the reporters on this story: Kari Lindberg in Hong Kong at klindberg13@bloomberg.net;Annie Lee in Hong Kong at olee42@bloomberg.net;Aaron Mc Nicholas in Hong Kong at amcnicholas2@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Shamim Adam at sadam2@bloomberg.net, ;Brendan Scott at bscott66@bloomberg.net, Stanley James, Andrew JanesFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


Revered as a saint by online extremists, how Christchurch shooter inspired copycat terrorists around the world

Revered as a saint by online extremists, how Christchurch shooter inspired copycat terrorists around the world“Brenton Tarrant was a catalyst for me personally. He showed me that it could be done. And that it needed to be done.”Those were the words written by John Timothy Earnest shortly before he stormed a synagogue in Poway, California, and opened fire on the Jewish congregation.


South Korea begins annual war games to defend against Japan

South Korea begins annual war games to defend against JapanSouth Korea Sunday began two days of war games to practise defending disputed islands off its east coast against an unlikely attack from Japan, further stoking tensions between the Asian neighbours. The annual drills come just days after Seoul terminated a military intelligence-sharing pact with Tokyo, with the countries at loggerheads over Japan's use of forced labour during World War II. The two-day exercise will involve warships and aircraft, the South Korean navy said in a text message without providing more detail.


Trump's economic anxiety comes to a boil

Trump's economic anxiety comes to a boilThe president directs U.S. businesses to pull out of China, but maintains that the "economy is doing really well."


Chinese embassy says the US is trying to suppress Huawei

Chinese embassy says the US is trying to suppress HuaweiAn embassy statement to The Associated Press said the arrest of Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou in Canada at the request of U.S. authorities is "of course different" from China's detentions of Canadians Michael Kovrig and Michael Spavor. "The Meng Wanzhou incident is not just a judicial case, but the U.S. using state power to work with its certain ally to suppress a private high-tech Chinese enterprise on unwarranted charges.


Fast-moving wildfire erupts in California, forcing thousands to evacuate

Fast-moving wildfire erupts in California, forcing thousands to evacuateMountain fire races across hundreds of acres in just hours as wildfire season looms large over the stateThis photo provided by Cal Fire shows an aerial view of the Mountain Fire on 22 August. Photograph: APA fast-moving wildfire that broke out on Thursday in northern California has forced the evacuation of nearly 4,000 residents, racing across at least 600 acres within just a few hours, officials say. The Mountain fire, which erupted on the outskirts of a national forest in northern California, has threatened 1,110 homes and structures. As of Friday morning the fire was 40% contained , according to Cal Fire.The cause of the fire is under investigation.Photos of the blaze posted on Twitter by the Shasta county sheriff’s office showed thick black and gray smoke billowing into the area over a highway near the Shasta-Trinity national forest.“Jones Valley and Bella Vista area residents! This situation is very fluid and rapidly changing, if you do not see your road listed but feel you are in danger YOU MAY EVACUATE to Shasta College Gymnasium,” the sheriff’s department said in a separate tweet.The Mountain fire is threatening thousands of homes and forcing evacuations. Photograph: APThe Shasta College campus was closed along with Highway 299 and about a dozen smaller roads. Residents of small communities in the path of the flames were told to evacuate or be prepared to flee on short notice.California was hit by some of the deadliest and most destructive wildfires in a century last year and state officials have warned this year’s fire season could be similarly intense.The Camp fire, which broke out in Butte county in November and overran the town of Paradise, killed 86 people and left thousands of others homeless. State fire investigators determined that the Camp fire was sparked by Pacific Gas & Electric Co transmission lines.The Mountain fire broke out on the same day that Bernie Sanders, the senator and Democratic presidential candidate, unveiled his $16.3tn climate change plan and toured Paradise, which he called a “wake-up call for our entire nation”.“Climate change is a major, major crisis for our country, and the entire world, and one of the manifestations of that crisis is what happened here,” Sanders said as he walked through a burned-out mobile home park in Paradise alongside people who lost their homes in last November’s deadly blaze.


Former police officer charged with murder for botched Houston raid

Former police officer charged with murder for botched Houston raidProsecutors are reviewing 14,000 criminal cases involving the drug squad that conducted the raid for evidence of improprieties, Harris County District Attorney Kim Ogg told a news conference. In January, then police officer Gerald Goines wrote in an affidavit to obtain a search warrant that an informant had bought heroin at the house, Ogg said. On Jan. 28, Goines and his Houston narcotics squad entered the house without knocking, as allowed under the warrant.


An innocent man spent months in jail after customs officials thought honey he brought back from Jamaica was liquid meth

An innocent man spent months in jail after customs officials thought honey he brought back from Jamaica was liquid methLeon Haughton told The Washington Post he was jailed for 82 days after customs officials in Baltimore alleged that the three jars of honey were meth.


Democratic presidential candidates have a new approach for tackling gun violence: Treat it as a public-health crisis

Democratic presidential candidates have a new approach for tackling gun violence: Treat it as a public-health crisisCandidates like Elizabeth Warren and Cory Booker want to draw on tactics used by community-based organizations to fight gun violence.


Cathay Pacific cabin crew union leader fired as Hong Kongers warn of spread of 'white terror'

Cathay Pacific cabin crew union leader fired as Hong Kongers warn of spread of 'white terror'Cathay Pacific fired a cabin crew union leader on Friday, the latest casualty in a fast-spreading “white terror” as mass protests in Hong Kong continue into their third month.  Rebecca Sy, head of the Cathay Dragon flight attendant’s association, said she lost her job of 17 years, without explanation,  after managers saw and confirmed her Facebook account,  which included messages in favour of the protests. “All the employees are being frightened, not just cabin crews, but even the management,” Ms Sy told reporters. “My colleagues are all terrified because of its white terror.” “White terror” is a term used to describe a slew of events that create a climate of fear particularly as companies and employees worry of serious repercussions for voicing their views. Her departure follows a surprise resignation last week by CEO Rupert Hogg, reported first by Chinese state media, underlining the political nature of the decision. Cathay has borne the brunt of Beijing’s anger as authorities look to punish companies with any link to the Hong Kong protests - a direct challenge to the power of the Communist Party. Rebecca Sy was dismissed from her position as flight attendant for Cathay Pacific's subsidiary Cathay Dragon Credit: ANTHONY WALLACE/AFP/Getty Images In the crackdown, companies and employees could face serious repercussions for voicing their views. Hong Kong subway operator MTR has also come under fire for arranging additional trains to allow protesters to travel home, accused of “colluding with rioters” in Chinese state media.  Beijing authorities have long put the squeeze on companies over political issues by encouraging its 1.4 billion citizens to snub various brands or by throwing up a number of regulatory roadblocks – a move that can have devastating consequences for even the biggest firms. Simon Cheng, 28, a British consular official in Hong Kong and permanent resident of the city has been detained for two weeks in mainland China for allegedly visiting prostitutes.  Under Chinese law, Mr Cheng should have been released today after a 15-day administrative period but at time of publication he was still in detention. Hong Kong police said on Friday that they did not know Mr Cheng's whereabouts.  Protests in Hong Kong first kicked off over an extradition proposal that would have exposed people to China’s murky legal and judicial system, where authorities have also in the past detained foreigners to express political displeasure. Two Canadians - Michael Kovrig, a former diplomat, and Michael Spavor, an entrepreneur - were detained in China last year during Beijing’s diplomatic dispute with Ottawa over its arrest of Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou. It is widely viewed that both men - who are still being held and have been charged with spying – are being used as political pawns. Hong Kong protests | Read more A number of multinationals operating in Hong Kong have sought to stress their political neutrality to avoid their businesses being targeted and to protect staff from arbitrary detention.  Earlier this week, the world’s “big four” accounting firms came under attack after an anonymous group claiming to be made up of their employees took out a full-page newspaper advertisement to express support for protests in Hong Kong and condemn the firms for remaining silent on the issue. Deloitte, Ernst & Young, KPMG and Pricewaterhouse Coopers all sought to distance themselves from the advertisement, saying it didn’t represent the companies’ views. But Chinese state media had already seized on the situation, calling for the firms to identify and sack the employees behind the ad. FinnAir has also issued a warning to staff to remember to “keep work and politics separate,” reported the South China Morning Post, over concerns that any link to the protests might lead to a customer backlash or flight cancellations in China, its second-largest market for long-haul travel.   “China is obviously putting pressure on companies to ensure that they all hold the same political views,” said Keenan Chuk, 30, a finance manager who attended a lunchtime rally or accountants in Hong Kong’s central business district Friday.  “I am concerned that I will be fired,” he said, adding that “we still have to fight for our rights.” Even universities have warned students against discussing politics and participating in rallies.  “In a modern society, education should be free from politics so as to alleviate the escalation of anxiety and avoid the divisive society caused by chaos,” according to a statement from the City University of Hong Kong issued earlier this month. A woman said she experienced at a police station during her detention in Hong Kong Credit: REUTERS/Thomas Peter Some banks are also now taking precautionary measures, purchasing full page ads in newspapers to affirm their support for the government. Edwin, 26, an accountant who declined to give his last name, said senior partners in his firm had invited junior employees to lunch that day in an attempt to dissuade people from attending Friday’s protest.  But he participated in the demonstration anyway, turning up again in the evening to join a human chain meant to evoke the Baltic Way, when two million lined up across three countries to protest Soviet rule in 1989.  “In the industry, we switch firms quite often,” he shrugged. Hong Kong police came under renewed pressure on Friday when officers were accused of conducting an unnecessary strip search on a female protester. The alleged victim appeared at a press conference dressed in all black with a black face mask, cap and sunglasses. Facing the cameras in front of a "MeToo" sign, she claimed she was arrested weeks ago at a protest against the now-abandoned extradition bill and was admitted to hospital for injuries she suffered that night. By her account, one officer patted her thighs with a pen, instructing her to open her legs wider after ordering her to take off all her clothes in a police cell. The police said their body search procedures had not changed during the recent outbreak of citywide protests.


Iceland Held Talks With U.S. Ambassador Over Pence Visit

Iceland Held Talks With U.S. Ambassador Over Pence Visit(Bloomberg) -- Iceland’ prime minister is open to a meeting with Vice President Mike Pence during his trip to the Nordic island, should the visit be extended.The option was discussed during a pre-scheduled meeting on Friday between Katrin Jakobsdottir and ambassador Jeffrey Gunter, a government spokesman told Bloomberg.Jakobsdottir, a left-of-center feminist and LGBT advocate, is due to attend a conference by Nordic trade union leaders in Sweden on Sept. 4. That’s the same day in which Pence is due to arrive.Jakobsdottir’s decision to not change her schedule to accommodate the vice president’s visit has been criticized at home.Olaf­ur Hardar­son, a professor of political science at the University of Iceland, told local media Morgunbladid it would be “unusual” for the prime minister not to greet the American vice president.According to her spokeswoman, a final decision on whether the meeting can take place has not yet been made.The White House said Pence planned to discuss trade opportunities, the Arctic and NATO efforts to counter Russian aggression in the region.The scheduling snafu is the latest episode in a series of exchanges involving Donald Trump and the Nordics.Pence’s visit would take place in the wake of a very public spat between the U.S. president and Denmark over its refusal to sell Greenland.Trump said Saturday he had held a “nice” conversation with Mette Frederiksen, with the exchange coming just days after labeling the Danish prime minister as “nasty.”In 2017, Sweden reacted forcibly to Trump’s portrayal of the Nordic nation as being in a state of chaos and overrun by crime after an influx of refugees.(Adds quote in fifth paragraph.)To contact the reporter on this story: Ragnhildur Sigurdardottir in Reykjavik at rsigurdardot@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Jonas Bergman at jbergman@bloomberg.net, Nick Rigillo, Andrew DavisFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


Fear grips Bangladesh camp as 2 Rohingya refugees killed

Fear grips Bangladesh camp as 2 Rohingya refugees killedBangladesh police said they had shot dead two Rohingya refugees during a gunfight in a refugee camp on Saturday after the pair were accused of killing a ruling party official. Nearly a million Rohingya live in squalid camps in southeast Bangladesh, 740,000 of whom fled a 2017 military offensive against the Muslim minority in Myanmar. The incident comes two days after a second failed attempt to repatriate the refugees, which saw not a single Rohingya turn up to return across the border to conflict-scarred Rakhine state.


Dow, stocks dive off Trump's latest comments on US-China trade war

Dow, stocks dive off Trump's latest comments on US-China trade warStocks fell sharply on Wall Street Friday after President Donald Trump called on U.S. companies to consider alternatives to doing business in China


All the Best Le Creuset Deals During Williams Sonoma Warehouse Sale

All the Best Le Creuset Deals During Williams Sonoma Warehouse Sale


Russian doctor has trace of radiation after explosion

Russian doctor has trace of radiation after explosionMore than 100 Russian medical workers who helped treat victims of a recent mysterious explosion at a military testing range have undergone checks and one man has been found with a trace of radiation, officials said Friday. It was followed by a brief rise in radiation levels in nearby Severodvinsk, but the authorities insisted it didn't pose any danger. The Arkhangelsk regional administration said Friday that 110 medical workers have undergone checks that one man was found with a low amount of radioactive cesium-137 in his muscle tissue.


Serial killer linked to dozens of U.S. murders pleads guilty to two more

Serial killer linked to dozens of U.S. murders pleads guilty to two moreThe date of the Jane Doe killing is unknown but is believed to have occurred sometime between 1980 and 1999. The 79-year-old defendant appeared in Cincinnati's Hamilton County Court via Skype from California State Prison in Los Angeles County and sat with his hands folded in a wheelchair, responding "Yes, ma'am" when Judge Melba Marsh asked if he waived his right to a trial by jury. "He said he specifically looked for people who would not be missed," Chief Assistant Prosecutor Mark Piepmeier told the judge.


Watch Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez play with a penguin because it's pure, uncut goodness

Watch Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez play with a penguin because it's pure, uncut goodnessThe world can be a cruel, unforgiving place. But, somehow, watching Congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez play and dance with a penguin makes everything just a little bit better. Even if only for a moment. On Saturday, Ocasio-Cortez tweeted a video of herself and her flipper-sporting friend engaged in a round of what looks to be playful dance. Seriously, it's adorable. The penguin is all the way in."A new day, a new friend," Ocasio-Cortez wrote of her encounter. Importantly, Ocasio-Cortez is not roaming around Antarctica. Rather, she appears to be in a science museum or zoo. The display next to the penguin enclosure includes facts about African Penguins -- which have a home in the Maryland Zoo, among other places.SEE ALSO: Australian strangers engage in weird, elaborate feud over their coffeeshop fandom"The Maryland Zoo maintains the largest colony of African penguins in North America," the Zoo helpfully notes on its website for all you penguin heads out there.Regardless of the specific location, we're totally in. Now excuse us while we play this video on repeat to drown out the world's sorrows.  WATCH: A prehistoric human-sized penguin has been discovered in New Zealand


A youth sports organization is raffling off a semi-automatic weapon to help its cheerleading and football teams

A youth sports organization is raffling off a semi-automatic weapon to help its cheerleading and football teamsAs a result of the controversy, the president of the organization said he is considering doing away with the rifle raffle for future fundraisers.


Cathay flight attendant says fired over Facebook posts on HK protests

Cathay flight attendant says fired over Facebook posts on HK protestsA flight attendant on Friday accused Cathay Pacific of summarily firing her over Facebook posts linked to Hong Kong's political crisis, adding to concerns about a China-driven witch-hunt to root out pro-democracy supporters at major firms. The Hong Kong-based airline has been accused of bowing to political and commercial pressure from Beijing by sacking employees in recent weeks for their public support for the massive anti-government movement roiling Hong Kong. Earlier this month, China's aviation authority ordered Cathay Pacific to stop pro-democracy supporters among its 27,000 staff from working on flights to -- or over -- China, after a general strike drew out some of its workers.


Man Throws Brick at Woman's Head in One of Several Random NYC Attacks

Man Throws Brick at Woman's Head in One of Several Random NYC AttacksA man has attacked at least four people in random Manhattan attacks this August, police said.


Qantas to test 'ultra long-haul' Sydney to NY, London flights

Qantas to test 'ultra long-haul' Sydney to NY, London flightsQantas on Thursday said it will run "ultra long-haul" test flights in the coming months from New York and London to Sydney in order to assess the health of pilots and passengers, as it eyes commercial services on the marathon routes. Qantas last year introduced the first direct service from the western Australian city of Perth to London, with the 17-hour journey one of the longest passenger flights in the world. "Flying non-stop from the East Coast of Australia to London and New York is truly the final frontier in aviation, so we're determined to do all the groundwork to get this right," Qantas CEO Alan Joyce said in a statement.


Pompeo says Huawei CEO is not a bargaining chip in Trump-China trade war

Pompeo says Huawei CEO is not a bargaining chip in Trump-China trade warMike Pompeo has rejected claims that detained Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou is being used for leverage in the US-China trade war. Speaking with his Canadian counterpart, Chrystia Freeland, in Ottawa on Thursday, the US secretary of state appeared to rule out dropping the extradition request for Ms Meng to ease tensions with Beijing, insisting it is a legal matter. In December, US president Donald Trump implied he might intervene in the case to help secure a trade deal with China. “Whatever’s good for this country, I would do,” he said at the time. The US alleges Ms Meng – the Chinese technology company’s chief financial officer and the daughter of its chief executive – helped  Huawei circumvent sanctions on Iran. According to Vancouver court documents released this week, she told a Canadian border official that the company has an office in Iran. The US has charged Ms Meng, 47, with bank fraud, wire fraud and conspiracy to commit both. She is currently on bail living under house arrest in one of her Vancouver mansions while her lawyers fight her extradition to the US. Asked on Thursday if she is a “bargaining chip” in US-China trade talks, Mr Pompeo replied simply: “No.” Since Ms Meng’s arrest in Vancouver airport on a US arrest warrant in December, ties between Ottawa and Beijing have fallen to a historically low ebb. Two Canadians, businessman Michael Svapor and former diplomat Michael Kovrig, were arrested and charged with espionage shortly afterwards in what is widely viewed as a reprisal by Beijing. “Our team is focussed on helping those two Canadians be released,” Mr Pompeo said later ahead of a meeting with Canadian prime minister Justin Trudeau. Mr Trump spoke directly to Chinese president Xi Jinping about their “arbitrary detention” in June, he told journalists. Mr Pompeo, 55, also slapped down a question comparing their confinement with that of Ms Meng, accusing the journalist of taking “the Chinese line”. Mr Pompeo was visiting Canada ahead of the G7 meeting in France, where relations with China will be discussed. On Friday, Beijing escalated the trade dispute, announcing fresh tariffs on US imports worth $75 billion (£61 billion).


Chinese buyers pull back from U.S. housing market, hurting home sales

Chinese buyers pull back from U.S. housing market, hurting home salesChinese investors are buying fewer U.S. homes because of money controls in China. That's lowering prices and giving U.S. buyers a better chance to buy


Rep. Steve King wants to make abortion point in 'softer way'

Rep. Steve King wants to make abortion point in 'softer way'Backed by supporters at a news conference in Des Moines, the Iowa Republican affirmed his belief that abortion should be outlawed with no exceptions for rape or incest. King faced criticism for his comment Aug. 14 that questioned whether there would be "any population of the world left" if not for births due to rape or incest. The remarks were condemned by numerous groups and individuals, including Republican and Democratic candidates seeking to oust King, Democratic presidential candidates as well as the Iowa Republican Party and Rep. Liz Cheney, the No. 3 Republican in House leadership.


Sitting Pretty

Sitting Pretty


Released from death row, then returned — forced to prove race discrimination a second time

Released from death row, then returned — forced to prove race discrimination a second timeCases before N.C. Supreme Court show link between slavery, Jim Crow and modern death penalty is as connected as 'ropes of the lynch-man's noose'


Israel hits Iranian force in Syria to stop 'killer drones': military

Israel hits Iranian force in Syria to stop 'killer drones': militaryJERUSALEM/DAMASCUS (Reuters) - Israeli aircraft on Saturday struck Iranian forces near Damascus that had been planning to launch "killer drones" at targets in Israel, an Israeli military spokesman said. "The strike targeted Iranian Quds Force operatives and Shiite militias which were preparing to advance attack plans targeting sites in Israel from within Syria over the last number of days," the military said in a statement. The elite Quds Force is the overseas arm of Iran's Revolutionary Guards (IRGC).


Britain sends another warship to Gulf

Britain sends another warship to GulfA third British warship is heading to the Gulf, the Royal Navy announced Saturday, amid heightened tensions in the region. Britain has already sent the HMS Kent to cover for frigate HMS Montrose while it undergoes maintenance in nearby Bahrain, and is now redirecting the Type 45 destroyer HMS Defender from its mission to the Pacific. Britain outraged Iran by seizing one of its tankers -- the Grace 1 -- on July 4 on suspicion it was carrying oil to Syria in violation of EU sanctions.


Kavanaugh’s High-School Classmate Sues HuffPost for Defamation

Kavanaugh’s High-School Classmate Sues HuffPost for DefamationA former high-school classmate of Supreme Court justice Brett Kavanaugh has filed suit against HuffPost over a “fabricated” report intended to detail the culture of debauchery at Georgetown Preparatory School during Kavanaugh's time there.HuffPost reporter Ashley Feinberg, now at Slate, published a report at the height of the Kavanaugh confirmation controversy entitled “Former Student: Brett Kavanaugh's Prep School Party Scene Was a ‘Free-For-All',” which purported to expose the degenerate culture that predominated at Georgetown Prep when Kavanaugh was a student. That hard-partying ethos supposedly culminated in the 1984 overdose death of David Kennedy, Robert F. Kennedy's son, in a Palm Beach hotel.Feinberg, citing one anonymous Georgetown Prep alumnus, wrote that “two students — David's brother Doug, and his friend Derrick Evans — had helped score the coke” that ultimately killed David. Evans, an African American professor and community activist, filed suit on Wednesday alleging that Feinberg failed to contact him and fabricated his role in David's death in her “zeal to create a sensational article about Judge Brett Kavanaugh’s years at [Georgetown Prep] and thereby drive traffic to [HuffPost's] website.”“Indeed, if Ms. Feinberg or her HuffPost editors had done even the most basic research of publicly available sources, she and they would have known, if they did not already know, that Mr. Evans actively assisted law enforcement in identifying and prosecuting the individuals who actually sold the illegal narcotics,” the lawsuit reads.HuffPost initially corrected the article after Doug Kennedy's employer, Fox News, sent a letter to the outlet rebutting its allegations.“This article previously stated incorrectly that Doug Kennedy was involved in helping his brother to purchase drugs in 1984. Kennedy was only sharing a room with Derrick Evans, who helped David purchase the drugs, according to an affidavit obtained by the New York Times. We regret the error,” reads a correction appended to the article just one day after it was published.While the correction exonerated Doug Kennedy it also further defamed Evans, according to the lawsuit.“The September 21 correction was another complete fabrication published by HuffPost with actual knowledge that both it and the original publication were false or in reckless disregard of the truth, again without ever attempting to contact Mr. Evans for comment,” the lawsuit reads. “As HuffPost knew, there was NO affidavit reflecting that Mr. Evans ever helped anyone purchase illegal drugs. Defendants had no such affidavit in their possession, and they could not have had such an affidavit in their possession.”The original article has been significantly altered since its publication and, as of this writing, no longer contains any reference to David's death.The case, Evans v. Huffington Post.com Inc., is now pending in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Mississippi.


Ghost Particles Could Explain Just About Everything in the Universe

Ghost Particles Could Explain Just About Everything in the UniverseYou might also know them by their other name: neutrinos.


U.S. ‘Starting to Lose China,’ Says Global Times’ Hu Xijin

U.S. ‘Starting to Lose China,’ Says Global Times’ Hu Xijin(Bloomberg) -- Terms of Trade is a daily newsletter that untangles a world embroiled in trade wars. Sign up here. China will follow through with retaliatory measures announced Friday and fight the trade war to the end, in the face of the U.S.’s failure to keep its promises, the state-run People’s Daily wrote in a Saturday editorial.Later, the influential Chinese journalist Hu Xijin said on Twitter that the U.S. is “starting to lose China.”On Friday, Beijing unveiled plans to impose additional tariffs on $75 billion of U.S. goods, including soybeans, automobiles and oil. The nation will “walk the talk” in implementing its third round of retaliatory measures, according to the newspaper.China has been forced into countermeasures by U.S. unilateralism and trade protectionism, the paper said, adding that Washington has been erratic in imposing tariffs on China and has shown “amnesia” in honoring its promises.Trade tensions between the two nations escalated on Friday after President Donald Trump said he’s raising tariffs on Chinese imports in response to the measures announced by Beijing. Anticipation of Trump’s actions, which were foreshadowed by a series of angry tweets, sent global stock markets reeling.Tariffs RisingExisting U.S. duties on $250 billion of Chinese imports will rise to 30% from 25% on Oct. 1, while a planned 10% tariff on a further $300 billion in Chinese goods will jump to 15%, starting with the first tranche on Sept. 1, Trump said in tweets Friday.China’s Ministry of Commerce issued a strongly-worded statement on Saturday saying the U.S. was involved in “unilateral and bullying trade protectionism” that puts the normal international trade order at risk.Trump, for his part, suggested in an overnight tweet that he was looking at the “Emergency Economic Powers Act of 1977” in ordering U.S. companies to quit China. “Case close!” Trump concluded.That measure -- technically, the International Emergency Economic Powers Act -- gives U.S. presidents wide latitude to regulate international commerce at times of national emergencies. It’s unclear how Trump could use the law in the current situation to have U.S. companies bend to his will.Hu, editor-in-chief of the Global Times, a tabloid newspaper controlled by China’s ruling Communist Party, accurately predicted the timing of China’s retaliatory tariffs on Friday.On Saturday, he said China “has ‘lost’ the U.S. already,” citing high tariffs, the ban on telecoms company Huawei Technologies Co. Ltd., political hostility, and actions toward Hong Kong and Taiwan. “We’re facing a completely different United States. We have nothing more to lose, while the US is just starting to lose China,” Xu said.While the Global Times doesn’t necessarily reflect the view of Chinese leaders, Hu has said the paper voices opinions that official sources can’t.Hu earlier tweeted that if U.S. automakers heed Trump’s Friday call for “major American companies” to desert China, they would be giving up the market to Japanese and German brands. “Go back to the US, let each American family have 20 cars,” he tweeted, followed by a smiley face.U.S. importers and retailers decried the latest moves by Trump.“These escalating tariffs are the worst economic mistake since the Smoot-Hawley Tariff Act of 1930 -- a decision that catapulted our country into the Great Depression,” Gary Shapiro, president and CEO of the Consumer Technology Association, said in a statement.(Updates with China’s Commerce Ministry, CTA comment from seventh paragraph.)To contact Bloomberg News staff for this story: Evelyn Yu in Shanghai at yyu263@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Sam Mamudi at smamudi@bloomberg.net, Ros Krasny, Steve GeimannFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


Man flees police on mobility scooter in low-speed chase as onlookers cheer 'Go old man!'

Man flees police on mobility scooter in low-speed chase as onlookers cheer 'Go old man!'The video shows Charlie Durham, a double amputee, speeding on his scooter as a police officer attempted to pull him over in New Zealand.


Lawsuit: Ex-Citadel staffer drugged, sexually abused cadet

Lawsuit: Ex-Citadel staffer drugged, sexually abused cadetA student at The Citadel sued an ex-instructor who he says agreed not to discipline him in exchange for sex. Former Citadel Lt. Col. Kenneth Boes was charged last year with sexually assaulting the cadet, but prosecutors dropped those charges for reasons that aren't explained in online court records. Boes' lawyer on Friday described the cadet as a false victim and violent young man who wants to make a quick buck at the expense of a man with an impeccable reputation.


Woman finds venomous spider in her ear after mistaking it for water

Woman finds venomous spider in her ear after mistaking it for waterThe discomfort in Susie Torres’ left ear felt like the water that can get stuck there after swimming. She heard swooshing when she woke up on Tuesday and assumed it had been caused by an allergy shot.Torres, of Kansas City, Missouri, discovered she was wrong when doctors extracted a dime-sized, venomous brown recluse spider, Fox 4 News reported.


Man Who Stopped to 'Assist' Woman Having Car Trouble Accused of Sexually Assaulting Her

Man Who Stopped to 'Assist' Woman Having Car Trouble Accused of Sexually Assaulting HerPolice in Monroe County, Indiana are working to identify a suspect in a rape case.


UPDATE 3-Saudi-led coalition says downs Houthi drone fired at airbase

UPDATE 3-Saudi-led coalition says downs Houthi drone fired at airbaseA Saudi-led military coalition fighting the Houthis in Yemen said it downed a drone on Sunday that the Iran-aligned group has said they launched in the direction of a Saudi airbase. "The coalition forces intercepted and downed a drone launched from the city of Sanaa in the direction of Khamis Muchait's residential neighbourhoods," coalition spokesman Colonel Turki al-Malki told the official Saudi Press Agency. A Houthi military spokesman cited by the group's Al-Masirah TV earlier said the group had launched drones targeting the control towers of the Abha airport and the Khamis Mushait airbase, both in the southwest of the kingdom.


N. Korea tests new 'super-large' multiple rocket launcher

N. Korea tests new 'super-large' multiple rocket launcherNorth Korea said Sunday leader Kim Jong Un supervised the test-firing of a "newly developed super-large multiple rocket launcher," another demonstration of its expanding weapons arsenal apparently aimed at increasing its leverage ahead of a possible resumption of nuclear talks with the U.S. Kim underscored the need to "continue to step up the development of Korean-style strategic and tactical weapons for resolutely frustrating the ever-mounting military threats and pressure offensive of the hostile forces," according to the KCNA. The "hostile forces" likely referred to the United States and South Korea, whose recently ended regular military drills infuriated North Korea.


Ex-wife, children of Atlanta surgeon Christopher Edwards found dead in apparent murder-suicide

Ex-wife, children of Atlanta surgeon Christopher Edwards found dead in apparent murder-suicideAuthorities say they believe Marsha Edwards shot Christopher Edwards Jr. and Erin Edwards before turning the gun on herself.


Police are trying to arrest their way out of a mass shooting epidemic, and experts warn that law enforcement can't shoulder the entire burden

Police are trying to arrest their way out of a mass shooting epidemic, and experts warn that law enforcement can't shoulder the entire burdenThe arrests won't fully or permanently stop a person determined to inflict mass death — and the US is nowhere near close to tackling the root causes.


UK Hong Kong consulate worker Simon Cheng freed after detention in mainland China

UK Hong Kong consulate worker Simon Cheng freed after detention in mainland ChinaA British consulate employee in Hong Kong has been freed by China after being detained for 15 days on the mainland amid rising tensions between the former British colony and Beijing. Simon Cheng, 28, a trade and investment officer at the Hong Kong consulate’s Scottish Development International section, went missing on August 8 on his way back from a work trip in Shenzhen, a neighbouring Chinese city.  It was not until after the UK expressed “extreme concern” about his disappearance that China’s foreign ministry broke its silence, confirming Mr Cheng had been detained without releasing further details.  On Saturday, his family announced that he had come back. "Simon has returned to Hong Kong; thanks you everyone for your support! Simon and his family wish to have some time to rest and recover, and will not take any interview,” they said in a statement.   An activist holds an illustration of Simon Cheng during a gathering outside the British Consulate-General building in Hong Kong  Credit: AFP Chinese police in Shenzhen confirmed that Mr Cheng had been detained for violating public security management regulations, and was released after that period on Saturday.  Police also said he had “confessed to the facts of his illegal activity,” without saying what those activities were. Mr Cheng was not formally charged or tried in court, and his family rejected allegations in Chinese state media that he had been detained for visiting prostitutes.  On Friday the UK issued a warning to all travellers to Hong Kong about increased scrutiny from mainland authorities at border crossings. The warning added that mobile phones and electronic devices were being checked by border patrol. Mr Cheng’s mysterious disappearance highlights China’s murky legal and judicial system – something that help kicked off mass protests early June in Hong Kong. Many fear freedoms enjoyed in Hong Kong, guaranteed for at least 50 years under an agreement that became effective when the former British colony was returned to Beijing, are fast-disappearing under China’s ruling Communist Party.  Hong Kong crisis | Comment and analysis Millions first took to the streets against a now-suspended extradition proposal that would have sent people to face trial in mainland China, where Communist Party control of the courts contributes to a 99.9 per cent conviction rate. Forced confessions are also common with suspects paraded on state television. “What happened to Simong Cheng – this is a common tactic used by the central government to put pressure on people,” said Kammy Yang, 50, an office clerk at a protest on Saturday. “Many Chinese activists were accused of prostitution or tax scams; this is their strategy in China, trying to suppress freedom.” Thousands of protesters on Saturday engaged in a series of skirmishes, throwing projectiles from bricks to petrol bombs at police who responded with sprays of tear gas and rubber bullets. It was the first time tear gas had been deployed in 10 days, a period of relative calm as protesters recalibrated their approach in an otherwise tumultuous, violent summer.  Demonstrators join hands to form a human chain during the Hong Kong Way event in the Central district of Hong Kong, China, on Friday Credit: Bloomberg “The reasons why protesters are building roadblocks, surrounding police stations, and throwing bricks – it’s because the government doesn’t respond to us,” said Vaso Chan, 28, an office clerk. “It’s not fun for any of us to come out during summer break.” Protesters spray painted slogans like “Give me liberty or death,” Chinazi,” and “HK popo Gestapo,” on sidewalks and highways. As the political movement has grown, so have protesters’ demands, who are now calling for an independent inquiry into police handling of the protests, the resignation of Hong Kong chief executive Carrie Lam, and direct leadership elections.  City leaders however have made no concessions, instead thrusting the police to the front lines to handle the situation, further angering protesters.  Demonstrations are occurring nearly every day now in the financial hub, disrupting traffic and public transportation. On Saturday, several stations closed along a planned march route. But despite growing unrest, public support for the protesters has stayed strong, with marches and strikes planned through September. “No matter whether those protesters are peaceful protesters or protesters that are standing in the ‘front lines’, no matter what they do, we will support them,” said Mr Chan.


VIDEO: 2 trans women, gay man ejected from DTLA bar after alleged altercation with other group

VIDEO: 2 trans women, gay man ejected from DTLA bar after alleged altercation with other groupTwo transgender women who were forcibly removed from a downtown L.A. bar say security guards used excessive force after they were allegedly verbally attacked with transphobic slurs.


20 of the Craziest Pickup Trucks Ever

20 of the Craziest Pickup Trucks Ever


Trump claim doctors treating mass shooting victims 'were coming out of operating rooms' to meet him dismissed by hospitals

Trump claim doctors treating mass shooting victims 'were coming out of operating rooms' to meet him dismissed by hospitalsTwo hospitals have denied Donald Trump’s claim doctors “were coming out of operating rooms” to meet him when he travelled to Texas and Ohio to console victims of two mass shootings."At no time did, or would, physicians or staff leave active operating rooms during the presidential visit,” University Medical Center (UMC) spokesperson Ryan Mielke told local TV station KVIA. “Our priority is always patient care."


Journalist killed in Mexico

Journalist killed in MexicoThe head of a Mexican news website was found stabbed to death in the center of the country, authorities said Saturday, the 10th such killing this year. The body of Nevith Condes Jaramillo "was found Saturday morning... showing injuries from a sharp object," the state prosecutor said in a statement. Condes Jaramillo, 42, was the head of a local news site in Tejupilco and was also an announcer on a community radio station.


Russia's Chechnya inaugurates what it says is Europe's largest mosque

Russia's Chechnya inaugurates what it says is Europe's largest mosqueAuthorities in the Russian region of Chechnya on Friday inaugurated what they said was the largest mosque in Europe in a pomp-filled ceremony attended by local and foreign officials. Named after the Prophet Mohammed, the marble-decorated mosque has capacity for more than 30,000 people and has been described by the Chechen authorities as the "largest and most beautiful" mosque in Europe. Chechen leader Ramzan Kadyrov, an ally of President Vladimir Putin, said the mosque -- located in Shali, a town of 54,000 just outside the regional capital Grozny -- was "unique in its design, and majestic in its size and beauty".


The Latest: Harris gets warm welcome at California meeting

The Latest: Harris gets warm welcome at California meetingCalifornia Sen. Kamala Harris is getting a rousing hometown welcome at the Democratic National Committee summer meeting in San Francisco. Harris is looking to California as a potentially key part of her path to the Democratic presidential nomination. With scores of supporters in the gallery Friday, Harris harkened back to her first political race for district attorney.


A man was training to get a gun permit. The instructor accidentally shot him, police say

A man was training to get a gun permit. The instructor accidentally shot him, police sayThe instructor, a Riverside County Sheriff's Department trainer, accidentally shot a student attending the class to get a concealed weapons permit.


A man with schizophrenia was found guilty of murdering a Saint Augustine's University student in 1979. 40 years later, a panel of judges decided he's innocent after all.

A man with schizophrenia was found guilty of murdering a Saint Augustine's University student in 1979. 40 years later, a panel of judges decided he's innocent after all.Blackmon's lawyers argued he was tricked by police and prosecutors into falsely confessing to a crime he didn't commit.


A floating nuclear plant in Russia features a gym, bar, and pool. An expert calls it 'Chernobyl on ice.'

A floating nuclear plant in Russia features a gym, bar, and pool. An expert calls it 'Chernobyl on ice.'Environmental activists worry about the perils of placing nuclear reactors at sea, where they could be vulnerable to climate-related disasters.


Metal detectorist finds £10,000 gold ring in garage 40 years after discarding it as worthless

Metal detectorist finds £10,000 gold ring in garage 40 years after discarding it as worthlessA metal detectorist who discarded a gold ring in his garage for 40 years after a museum told him it was worthless has discovered its real value is £10,000. Tom Clark, 81, dug up the buried treasure while scanning an area of farmland near Aylesbury, Buckinghamshire, in 1979, then put it inside a metal tin and forgot about it. But the retired leather craftsman came across the rare seal ring eight years ago while sorting through items from his mother's house after she passed away. He got the item valued and was astonished to discover that it was actually a 670-year-old medieval artefact dating back to 1350. It is due to be auctioned off in Derbyshire on Tuesday (Aug 27) and is expected to sell for between £8,500 and £10,000. The turn of events is similar to the plot of BBC sitcom Only Fools and Horses, when brothers Del and Rodney come across a watch in their garage which is then auctioned off for millions of pounds. Mr Clark said: "I had completely forgotten about it. At the time I'd only been metal detecting for 10 years and didn't realise the ring was anything special. It was all twisted and broken when I dug it up." He took the rare ring along with some others to a museum to have them valued at the time, but was told they were all fairly modern. "I put them all in a tin and left them in the garage at my mother's house," he said. "A few months ago, I was sorting through some stuff in my own garage that had come from my mother's house and there it was - the tin with the rings in it." Tom is auctioning off the ring, which is expected to make between £8,500 and £10,000 Credit: Hansons / SWNS/Hansons / SWNS Mr Clark, now a much more experienced collector, said he instantly knew it was a seal ring dating back to the 1300s and would have belonged to someone important given its decoration and quality. He added: "It's rare and elegant. I'd love to know who it belonged to." A Latin inscription on the ring translates as 'I hide the true message'. Mark Becher, Historica expert at auctioneer Hansons, said: "It's a fascinating piece of medieval jewellery and I'm delighted Tom rediscovered again after all these years."


Police Arrest 29 as Protesters Cause Damage: Hong Kong Update

Police Arrest 29 as Protesters Cause Damage: Hong Kong Update(Bloomberg) -- Hong Kong police fired tear gas and arrested 29 people on Saturday after protesters occupied roads, set up barricades and hurled projectiles in the 12th week of unrest in the Asian financial center.At least two more rallies were taking place on Sunday, including one organized by relatives of police officers, who have been criticized for using excessive force to quell protests. Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam held a meeting on Saturday with former officials and other prominent people to find a way out of the impasse that has rocked the former British colony.Demonstrators are looking to maintain momentum after large but peaceful protests last weekend temporarily broke a pattern of tear gas and police clashes. They formed a human chain across the city on Friday, while a plan to disrupt airport transportation services on Saturday wasn’t successful. Historic mass marches opposing legislation easing extraditions to China began peacefully in June, and have since widened into a broader movement against Beijing’s increasing grip.Key Developments:Police arrested more than two dozen protesters on SaturdayChief Executive Lam seeks to build a dialogue platform to address roots of discontentU.K. consulate staffer Simon Cheng was released by China on Saturday after more than two weeks of detentionHere’s the latest:Rain march (Sunday 2 p.m.)People took cover from the persistent rain and filled the stands and pitch of the Kwai Chung sports stadium, the starting point for Sunday’s rally. The march from the stadium was granted late-night approval after organizers appealed an earlier objection by authorities.“The rainy weather is good for the protesters but it’s bad for the police, who are wearing heavy gear. It also makes their tear gas ineffective,” said Gloria Mak, a 25-year-old assistant to a Japanese company.Train service suspended (Sunday 11.30 a.m.)MTR Corp., operator of Hong Kong’s rail network, suspended train service to stations near the planned Tsuen Wan march. The company said in a statement that the Kwai Fong, Tsuen Wan and Tai Wo Hau stations would be closed from 1.30 p.m. until further notice.On Saturday, MTR suspended service on parts of its Kwun Tong line because of protests in the area.Operations Director Adi Lau Tin-shing said the current situation was the company’s biggest challenge in its 40 years of operation and that the station closures were an unavoidable decision taken on the grounds of safety.Police condemn ‘radical’ behavior (Sunday, 3:02 a.m.)Police said “radical protesters” in Saturday’s clashes used electric saws to damage a number of smart lampposts, and hurled hard objects, bricks and petrol bombs at officers. They arrested 19 men and 10 women, aged between 17 and 52, for offenses including the possession of offensive weapons and assaulting police officers, the police said in a statement.Bricks and bamboo poles (Saturday 4:20 p.m.)Police fired tear gas to break up demonstrators blocking a road in the Kwung Tong area. Protesters were seen breaking bricks into smaller pieces and using bamboo poles to keep police from getting close to a barricade they erected. Elsewhere, video footage showed a so-called smart lamppost that was toppled and notes declaring “no totalitarian surveillance” were pasted on it.Protesters split up from the authorized march route and some regathered in the neighborhood of Wong Tai Sin, the scene of clashes earlier this month. Police fired tear gas and made arrests after the demonstrators blocked off roads and disrupted traffic.Lam seeks dialogue platform (Saturday 3:10 p.m.)About 30 people were invited to the meeting organized by Lam in Government House, including ex-transport chief Anthony Cheung and Cardinal John Tong, the former bishop of Hong Kong, RTHK reported. Lam said the meeting was not a “dialogue platform” but a gathering to share ideas on how to build dialogue.“I do not expect dialogue to easily resolve the deadlock, stop demonstrations, or to provide solutions to problems,” she said in a Facebook post. “But continuing to fight is not the way out.”Cathay issues warning (3.30 p.m.)Cathay Pacific Airways Ltd. said it will not tolerate employees supporting or taking part in illegal protests ahead of “planned activities” by the Hong Kong Confederation of Trade Unions on Aug. 26.The Airport Authority Hong Kong obtained a High Court order to extend an interim injunction granted on Aug. 13 banning protesters from unlawfully obstructing access to the airport. That injunction covers Cathay City, “which is the operational hub for our global operations and as such includes facilities that are absolutely critical to our flight operations,” Cathay said in Saturday’s statement.Operations at the city’s airport were disrupted earlier this month when protesters occupied the building.U.K. Consulate Staffer Freed (10:39 a.m.)Chinese police released a U.K. consulate staffer from Hong Kong after more than two weeks in detention. Simon Cheng was set free on Saturday after he was held for violating the Public Security Administration Punishment Law, police in the southern Chinese city of Shenzhen said in a post on the Weibo social media platform. He failed to return home to Hong Kong from an Aug. 8 meeting in Shenzhen.Upcoming ScheduleThe weekend concludes with Sunday protests in the Tsuen Wan and Kwai Chung areas, starting mid-afternoon. Relatives of police also plan a march to the official residence of Chief Executive Lam in support of local law enforcement.\--With assistance from Justin Chin, Sheryl Tian Tong Lee and Venus Feng.To contact the reporters on this story: Kari Lindberg in Hong Kong at klindberg13@bloomberg.net;Annie Lee in Hong Kong at olee42@bloomberg.net;Aaron Mc Nicholas in Hong Kong at amcnicholas2@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Shamim Adam at sadam2@bloomberg.net, ;Brendan Scott at bscott66@bloomberg.net, Stanley James, Andrew JanesFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


Revered as a saint by online extremists, how Christchurch shooter inspired copycat terrorists around the world

Revered as a saint by online extremists, how Christchurch shooter inspired copycat terrorists around the world“Brenton Tarrant was a catalyst for me personally. He showed me that it could be done. And that it needed to be done.”Those were the words written by John Timothy Earnest shortly before he stormed a synagogue in Poway, California, and opened fire on the Jewish congregation.


South Korea begins annual war games to defend against Japan

South Korea begins annual war games to defend against JapanSouth Korea Sunday began two days of war games to practise defending disputed islands off its east coast against an unlikely attack from Japan, further stoking tensions between the Asian neighbours. The annual drills come just days after Seoul terminated a military intelligence-sharing pact with Tokyo, with the countries at loggerheads over Japan's use of forced labour during World War II. The two-day exercise will involve warships and aircraft, the South Korean navy said in a text message without providing more detail.


Trump's economic anxiety comes to a boil

Trump's economic anxiety comes to a boilThe president directs U.S. businesses to pull out of China, but maintains that the "economy is doing really well."


Chinese embassy says the US is trying to suppress Huawei

Chinese embassy says the US is trying to suppress HuaweiAn embassy statement to The Associated Press said the arrest of Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou in Canada at the request of U.S. authorities is "of course different" from China's detentions of Canadians Michael Kovrig and Michael Spavor. "The Meng Wanzhou incident is not just a judicial case, but the U.S. using state power to work with its certain ally to suppress a private high-tech Chinese enterprise on unwarranted charges.


Fast-moving wildfire erupts in California, forcing thousands to evacuate

Fast-moving wildfire erupts in California, forcing thousands to evacuateMountain fire races across hundreds of acres in just hours as wildfire season looms large over the stateThis photo provided by Cal Fire shows an aerial view of the Mountain Fire on 22 August. Photograph: APA fast-moving wildfire that broke out on Thursday in northern California has forced the evacuation of nearly 4,000 residents, racing across at least 600 acres within just a few hours, officials say. The Mountain fire, which erupted on the outskirts of a national forest in northern California, has threatened 1,110 homes and structures. As of Friday morning the fire was 40% contained , according to Cal Fire.The cause of the fire is under investigation.Photos of the blaze posted on Twitter by the Shasta county sheriff’s office showed thick black and gray smoke billowing into the area over a highway near the Shasta-Trinity national forest.“Jones Valley and Bella Vista area residents! This situation is very fluid and rapidly changing, if you do not see your road listed but feel you are in danger YOU MAY EVACUATE to Shasta College Gymnasium,” the sheriff’s department said in a separate tweet.The Mountain fire is threatening thousands of homes and forcing evacuations. Photograph: APThe Shasta College campus was closed along with Highway 299 and about a dozen smaller roads. Residents of small communities in the path of the flames were told to evacuate or be prepared to flee on short notice.California was hit by some of the deadliest and most destructive wildfires in a century last year and state officials have warned this year’s fire season could be similarly intense.The Camp fire, which broke out in Butte county in November and overran the town of Paradise, killed 86 people and left thousands of others homeless. State fire investigators determined that the Camp fire was sparked by Pacific Gas & Electric Co transmission lines.The Mountain fire broke out on the same day that Bernie Sanders, the senator and Democratic presidential candidate, unveiled his $16.3tn climate change plan and toured Paradise, which he called a “wake-up call for our entire nation”.“Climate change is a major, major crisis for our country, and the entire world, and one of the manifestations of that crisis is what happened here,” Sanders said as he walked through a burned-out mobile home park in Paradise alongside people who lost their homes in last November’s deadly blaze.


Former police officer charged with murder for botched Houston raid

Former police officer charged with murder for botched Houston raidProsecutors are reviewing 14,000 criminal cases involving the drug squad that conducted the raid for evidence of improprieties, Harris County District Attorney Kim Ogg told a news conference. In January, then police officer Gerald Goines wrote in an affidavit to obtain a search warrant that an informant had bought heroin at the house, Ogg said. On Jan. 28, Goines and his Houston narcotics squad entered the house without knocking, as allowed under the warrant.


An innocent man spent months in jail after customs officials thought honey he brought back from Jamaica was liquid meth

An innocent man spent months in jail after customs officials thought honey he brought back from Jamaica was liquid methLeon Haughton told The Washington Post he was jailed for 82 days after customs officials in Baltimore alleged that the three jars of honey were meth.


Democratic presidential candidates have a new approach for tackling gun violence: Treat it as a public-health crisis

Democratic presidential candidates have a new approach for tackling gun violence: Treat it as a public-health crisisCandidates like Elizabeth Warren and Cory Booker want to draw on tactics used by community-based organizations to fight gun violence.


Cathay Pacific cabin crew union leader fired as Hong Kongers warn of spread of 'white terror'

Cathay Pacific cabin crew union leader fired as Hong Kongers warn of spread of 'white terror'Cathay Pacific fired a cabin crew union leader on Friday, the latest casualty in a fast-spreading “white terror” as mass protests in Hong Kong continue into their third month.  Rebecca Sy, head of the Cathay Dragon flight attendant’s association, said she lost her job of 17 years, without explanation,  after managers saw and confirmed her Facebook account,  which included messages in favour of the protests. “All the employees are being frightened, not just cabin crews, but even the management,” Ms Sy told reporters. “My colleagues are all terrified because of its white terror.” “White terror” is a term used to describe a slew of events that create a climate of fear particularly as companies and employees worry of serious repercussions for voicing their views. Her departure follows a surprise resignation last week by CEO Rupert Hogg, reported first by Chinese state media, underlining the political nature of the decision. Cathay has borne the brunt of Beijing’s anger as authorities look to punish companies with any link to the Hong Kong protests - a direct challenge to the power of the Communist Party. Rebecca Sy was dismissed from her position as flight attendant for Cathay Pacific's subsidiary Cathay Dragon Credit: ANTHONY WALLACE/AFP/Getty Images In the crackdown, companies and employees could face serious repercussions for voicing their views. Hong Kong subway operator MTR has also come under fire for arranging additional trains to allow protesters to travel home, accused of “colluding with rioters” in Chinese state media.  Beijing authorities have long put the squeeze on companies over political issues by encouraging its 1.4 billion citizens to snub various brands or by throwing up a number of regulatory roadblocks – a move that can have devastating consequences for even the biggest firms. Simon Cheng, 28, a British consular official in Hong Kong and permanent resident of the city has been detained for two weeks in mainland China for allegedly visiting prostitutes.  Under Chinese law, Mr Cheng should have been released today after a 15-day administrative period but at time of publication he was still in detention. Hong Kong police said on Friday that they did not know Mr Cheng's whereabouts.  Protests in Hong Kong first kicked off over an extradition proposal that would have exposed people to China’s murky legal and judicial system, where authorities have also in the past detained foreigners to express political displeasure. Two Canadians - Michael Kovrig, a former diplomat, and Michael Spavor, an entrepreneur - were detained in China last year during Beijing’s diplomatic dispute with Ottawa over its arrest of Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou. It is widely viewed that both men - who are still being held and have been charged with spying – are being used as political pawns. Hong Kong protests | Read more A number of multinationals operating in Hong Kong have sought to stress their political neutrality to avoid their businesses being targeted and to protect staff from arbitrary detention.  Earlier this week, the world’s “big four” accounting firms came under attack after an anonymous group claiming to be made up of their employees took out a full-page newspaper advertisement to express support for protests in Hong Kong and condemn the firms for remaining silent on the issue. Deloitte, Ernst & Young, KPMG and Pricewaterhouse Coopers all sought to distance themselves from the advertisement, saying it didn’t represent the companies’ views. But Chinese state media had already seized on the situation, calling for the firms to identify and sack the employees behind the ad. FinnAir has also issued a warning to staff to remember to “keep work and politics separate,” reported the South China Morning Post, over concerns that any link to the protests might lead to a customer backlash or flight cancellations in China, its second-largest market for long-haul travel.   “China is obviously putting pressure on companies to ensure that they all hold the same political views,” said Keenan Chuk, 30, a finance manager who attended a lunchtime rally or accountants in Hong Kong’s central business district Friday.  “I am concerned that I will be fired,” he said, adding that “we still have to fight for our rights.” Even universities have warned students against discussing politics and participating in rallies.  “In a modern society, education should be free from politics so as to alleviate the escalation of anxiety and avoid the divisive society caused by chaos,” according to a statement from the City University of Hong Kong issued earlier this month. A woman said she experienced at a police station during her detention in Hong Kong Credit: REUTERS/Thomas Peter Some banks are also now taking precautionary measures, purchasing full page ads in newspapers to affirm their support for the government. Edwin, 26, an accountant who declined to give his last name, said senior partners in his firm had invited junior employees to lunch that day in an attempt to dissuade people from attending Friday’s protest.  But he participated in the demonstration anyway, turning up again in the evening to join a human chain meant to evoke the Baltic Way, when two million lined up across three countries to protest Soviet rule in 1989.  “In the industry, we switch firms quite often,” he shrugged. Hong Kong police came under renewed pressure on Friday when officers were accused of conducting an unnecessary strip search on a female protester. The alleged victim appeared at a press conference dressed in all black with a black face mask, cap and sunglasses. Facing the cameras in front of a "MeToo" sign, she claimed she was arrested weeks ago at a protest against the now-abandoned extradition bill and was admitted to hospital for injuries she suffered that night. By her account, one officer patted her thighs with a pen, instructing her to open her legs wider after ordering her to take off all her clothes in a police cell. The police said their body search procedures had not changed during the recent outbreak of citywide protests.


Iceland Held Talks With U.S. Ambassador Over Pence Visit

Iceland Held Talks With U.S. Ambassador Over Pence Visit(Bloomberg) -- Iceland’ prime minister is open to a meeting with Vice President Mike Pence during his trip to the Nordic island, should the visit be extended.The option was discussed during a pre-scheduled meeting on Friday between Katrin Jakobsdottir and ambassador Jeffrey Gunter, a government spokesman told Bloomberg.Jakobsdottir, a left-of-center feminist and LGBT advocate, is due to attend a conference by Nordic trade union leaders in Sweden on Sept. 4. That’s the same day in which Pence is due to arrive.Jakobsdottir’s decision to not change her schedule to accommodate the vice president’s visit has been criticized at home.Olaf­ur Hardar­son, a professor of political science at the University of Iceland, told local media Morgunbladid it would be “unusual” for the prime minister not to greet the American vice president.According to her spokeswoman, a final decision on whether the meeting can take place has not yet been made.The White House said Pence planned to discuss trade opportunities, the Arctic and NATO efforts to counter Russian aggression in the region.The scheduling snafu is the latest episode in a series of exchanges involving Donald Trump and the Nordics.Pence’s visit would take place in the wake of a very public spat between the U.S. president and Denmark over its refusal to sell Greenland.Trump said Saturday he had held a “nice” conversation with Mette Frederiksen, with the exchange coming just days after labeling the Danish prime minister as “nasty.”In 2017, Sweden reacted forcibly to Trump’s portrayal of the Nordic nation as being in a state of chaos and overrun by crime after an influx of refugees.(Adds quote in fifth paragraph.)To contact the reporter on this story: Ragnhildur Sigurdardottir in Reykjavik at rsigurdardot@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Jonas Bergman at jbergman@bloomberg.net, Nick Rigillo, Andrew DavisFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


Fear grips Bangladesh camp as 2 Rohingya refugees killed

Fear grips Bangladesh camp as 2 Rohingya refugees killedBangladesh police said they had shot dead two Rohingya refugees during a gunfight in a refugee camp on Saturday after the pair were accused of killing a ruling party official. Nearly a million Rohingya live in squalid camps in southeast Bangladesh, 740,000 of whom fled a 2017 military offensive against the Muslim minority in Myanmar. The incident comes two days after a second failed attempt to repatriate the refugees, which saw not a single Rohingya turn up to return across the border to conflict-scarred Rakhine state.


Dow, stocks dive off Trump's latest comments on US-China trade war

Dow, stocks dive off Trump's latest comments on US-China trade warStocks fell sharply on Wall Street Friday after President Donald Trump called on U.S. companies to consider alternatives to doing business in China


All the Best Le Creuset Deals During Williams Sonoma Warehouse Sale

All the Best Le Creuset Deals During Williams Sonoma Warehouse Sale


Russian doctor has trace of radiation after explosion

Russian doctor has trace of radiation after explosionMore than 100 Russian medical workers who helped treat victims of a recent mysterious explosion at a military testing range have undergone checks and one man has been found with a trace of radiation, officials said Friday. It was followed by a brief rise in radiation levels in nearby Severodvinsk, but the authorities insisted it didn't pose any danger. The Arkhangelsk regional administration said Friday that 110 medical workers have undergone checks that one man was found with a low amount of radioactive cesium-137 in his muscle tissue.


Serial killer linked to dozens of U.S. murders pleads guilty to two more

Serial killer linked to dozens of U.S. murders pleads guilty to two moreThe date of the Jane Doe killing is unknown but is believed to have occurred sometime between 1980 and 1999. The 79-year-old defendant appeared in Cincinnati's Hamilton County Court via Skype from California State Prison in Los Angeles County and sat with his hands folded in a wheelchair, responding "Yes, ma'am" when Judge Melba Marsh asked if he waived his right to a trial by jury. "He said he specifically looked for people who would not be missed," Chief Assistant Prosecutor Mark Piepmeier told the judge.


Watch Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez play with a penguin because it's pure, uncut goodness

Watch Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez play with a penguin because it's pure, uncut goodnessThe world can be a cruel, unforgiving place. But, somehow, watching Congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez play and dance with a penguin makes everything just a little bit better. Even if only for a moment. On Saturday, Ocasio-Cortez tweeted a video of herself and her flipper-sporting friend engaged in a round of what looks to be playful dance. Seriously, it's adorable. The penguin is all the way in."A new day, a new friend," Ocasio-Cortez wrote of her encounter. Importantly, Ocasio-Cortez is not roaming around Antarctica. Rather, she appears to be in a science museum or zoo. The display next to the penguin enclosure includes facts about African Penguins -- which have a home in the Maryland Zoo, among other places.SEE ALSO: Australian strangers engage in weird, elaborate feud over their coffeeshop fandom"The Maryland Zoo maintains the largest colony of African penguins in North America," the Zoo helpfully notes on its website for all you penguin heads out there.Regardless of the specific location, we're totally in. Now excuse us while we play this video on repeat to drown out the world's sorrows.  WATCH: A prehistoric human-sized penguin has been discovered in New Zealand


A youth sports organization is raffling off a semi-automatic weapon to help its cheerleading and football teams

A youth sports organization is raffling off a semi-automatic weapon to help its cheerleading and football teamsAs a result of the controversy, the president of the organization said he is considering doing away with the rifle raffle for future fundraisers.


Cathay flight attendant says fired over Facebook posts on HK protests

Cathay flight attendant says fired over Facebook posts on HK protestsA flight attendant on Friday accused Cathay Pacific of summarily firing her over Facebook posts linked to Hong Kong's political crisis, adding to concerns about a China-driven witch-hunt to root out pro-democracy supporters at major firms. The Hong Kong-based airline has been accused of bowing to political and commercial pressure from Beijing by sacking employees in recent weeks for their public support for the massive anti-government movement roiling Hong Kong. Earlier this month, China's aviation authority ordered Cathay Pacific to stop pro-democracy supporters among its 27,000 staff from working on flights to -- or over -- China, after a general strike drew out some of its workers.


Man Throws Brick at Woman's Head in One of Several Random NYC Attacks

Man Throws Brick at Woman's Head in One of Several Random NYC AttacksA man has attacked at least four people in random Manhattan attacks this August, police said.


Qantas to test 'ultra long-haul' Sydney to NY, London flights

Qantas to test 'ultra long-haul' Sydney to NY, London flightsQantas on Thursday said it will run "ultra long-haul" test flights in the coming months from New York and London to Sydney in order to assess the health of pilots and passengers, as it eyes commercial services on the marathon routes. Qantas last year introduced the first direct service from the western Australian city of Perth to London, with the 17-hour journey one of the longest passenger flights in the world. "Flying non-stop from the East Coast of Australia to London and New York is truly the final frontier in aviation, so we're determined to do all the groundwork to get this right," Qantas CEO Alan Joyce said in a statement.


Pompeo says Huawei CEO is not a bargaining chip in Trump-China trade war

Pompeo says Huawei CEO is not a bargaining chip in Trump-China trade warMike Pompeo has rejected claims that detained Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou is being used for leverage in the US-China trade war. Speaking with his Canadian counterpart, Chrystia Freeland, in Ottawa on Thursday, the US secretary of state appeared to rule out dropping the extradition request for Ms Meng to ease tensions with Beijing, insisting it is a legal matter. In December, US president Donald Trump implied he might intervene in the case to help secure a trade deal with China. “Whatever’s good for this country, I would do,” he said at the time. The US alleges Ms Meng – the Chinese technology company’s chief financial officer and the daughter of its chief executive – helped  Huawei circumvent sanctions on Iran. According to Vancouver court documents released this week, she told a Canadian border official that the company has an office in Iran. The US has charged Ms Meng, 47, with bank fraud, wire fraud and conspiracy to commit both. She is currently on bail living under house arrest in one of her Vancouver mansions while her lawyers fight her extradition to the US. Asked on Thursday if she is a “bargaining chip” in US-China trade talks, Mr Pompeo replied simply: “No.” Since Ms Meng’s arrest in Vancouver airport on a US arrest warrant in December, ties between Ottawa and Beijing have fallen to a historically low ebb. Two Canadians, businessman Michael Svapor and former diplomat Michael Kovrig, were arrested and charged with espionage shortly afterwards in what is widely viewed as a reprisal by Beijing. “Our team is focussed on helping those two Canadians be released,” Mr Pompeo said later ahead of a meeting with Canadian prime minister Justin Trudeau. Mr Trump spoke directly to Chinese president Xi Jinping about their “arbitrary detention” in June, he told journalists. Mr Pompeo, 55, also slapped down a question comparing their confinement with that of Ms Meng, accusing the journalist of taking “the Chinese line”. Mr Pompeo was visiting Canada ahead of the G7 meeting in France, where relations with China will be discussed. On Friday, Beijing escalated the trade dispute, announcing fresh tariffs on US imports worth $75 billion (£61 billion).


Chinese buyers pull back from U.S. housing market, hurting home sales

Chinese buyers pull back from U.S. housing market, hurting home salesChinese investors are buying fewer U.S. homes because of money controls in China. That's lowering prices and giving U.S. buyers a better chance to buy


Rep. Steve King wants to make abortion point in 'softer way'

Rep. Steve King wants to make abortion point in 'softer way'Backed by supporters at a news conference in Des Moines, the Iowa Republican affirmed his belief that abortion should be outlawed with no exceptions for rape or incest. King faced criticism for his comment Aug. 14 that questioned whether there would be "any population of the world left" if not for births due to rape or incest. The remarks were condemned by numerous groups and individuals, including Republican and Democratic candidates seeking to oust King, Democratic presidential candidates as well as the Iowa Republican Party and Rep. Liz Cheney, the No. 3 Republican in House leadership.


Sitting Pretty

Sitting Pretty


Released from death row, then returned — forced to prove race discrimination a second time

Released from death row, then returned — forced to prove race discrimination a second timeCases before N.C. Supreme Court show link between slavery, Jim Crow and modern death penalty is as connected as 'ropes of the lynch-man's noose'


Israel hits Iranian force in Syria to stop 'killer drones': military

Israel hits Iranian force in Syria to stop 'killer drones': militaryJERUSALEM/DAMASCUS (Reuters) - Israeli aircraft on Saturday struck Iranian forces near Damascus that had been planning to launch "killer drones" at targets in Israel, an Israeli military spokesman said. "The strike targeted Iranian Quds Force operatives and Shiite militias which were preparing to advance attack plans targeting sites in Israel from within Syria over the last number of days," the military said in a statement. The elite Quds Force is the overseas arm of Iran's Revolutionary Guards (IRGC).


Britain sends another warship to Gulf

Britain sends another warship to GulfA third British warship is heading to the Gulf, the Royal Navy announced Saturday, amid heightened tensions in the region. Britain has already sent the HMS Kent to cover for frigate HMS Montrose while it undergoes maintenance in nearby Bahrain, and is now redirecting the Type 45 destroyer HMS Defender from its mission to the Pacific. Britain outraged Iran by seizing one of its tankers -- the Grace 1 -- on July 4 on suspicion it was carrying oil to Syria in violation of EU sanctions.


Kavanaugh’s High-School Classmate Sues HuffPost for Defamation

Kavanaugh’s High-School Classmate Sues HuffPost for DefamationA former high-school classmate of Supreme Court justice Brett Kavanaugh has filed suit against HuffPost over a “fabricated” report intended to detail the culture of debauchery at Georgetown Preparatory School during Kavanaugh's time there.HuffPost reporter Ashley Feinberg, now at Slate, published a report at the height of the Kavanaugh confirmation controversy entitled “Former Student: Brett Kavanaugh's Prep School Party Scene Was a ‘Free-For-All',” which purported to expose the degenerate culture that predominated at Georgetown Prep when Kavanaugh was a student. That hard-partying ethos supposedly culminated in the 1984 overdose death of David Kennedy, Robert F. Kennedy's son, in a Palm Beach hotel.Feinberg, citing one anonymous Georgetown Prep alumnus, wrote that “two students — David's brother Doug, and his friend Derrick Evans — had helped score the coke” that ultimately killed David. Evans, an African American professor and community activist, filed suit on Wednesday alleging that Feinberg failed to contact him and fabricated his role in David's death in her “zeal to create a sensational article about Judge Brett Kavanaugh’s years at [Georgetown Prep] and thereby drive traffic to [HuffPost's] website.”“Indeed, if Ms. Feinberg or her HuffPost editors had done even the most basic research of publicly available sources, she and they would have known, if they did not already know, that Mr. Evans actively assisted law enforcement in identifying and prosecuting the individuals who actually sold the illegal narcotics,” the lawsuit reads.HuffPost initially corrected the article after Doug Kennedy's employer, Fox News, sent a letter to the outlet rebutting its allegations.“This article previously stated incorrectly that Doug Kennedy was involved in helping his brother to purchase drugs in 1984. Kennedy was only sharing a room with Derrick Evans, who helped David purchase the drugs, according to an affidavit obtained by the New York Times. We regret the error,” reads a correction appended to the article just one day after it was published.While the correction exonerated Doug Kennedy it also further defamed Evans, according to the lawsuit.“The September 21 correction was another complete fabrication published by HuffPost with actual knowledge that both it and the original publication were false or in reckless disregard of the truth, again without ever attempting to contact Mr. Evans for comment,” the lawsuit reads. “As HuffPost knew, there was NO affidavit reflecting that Mr. Evans ever helped anyone purchase illegal drugs. Defendants had no such affidavit in their possession, and they could not have had such an affidavit in their possession.”The original article has been significantly altered since its publication and, as of this writing, no longer contains any reference to David's death.The case, Evans v. Huffington Post.com Inc., is now pending in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Mississippi.


Ghost Particles Could Explain Just About Everything in the Universe

Ghost Particles Could Explain Just About Everything in the UniverseYou might also know them by their other name: neutrinos.


U.S. ‘Starting to Lose China,’ Says Global Times’ Hu Xijin

U.S. ‘Starting to Lose China,’ Says Global Times’ Hu Xijin(Bloomberg) -- Terms of Trade is a daily newsletter that untangles a world embroiled in trade wars. Sign up here. China will follow through with retaliatory measures announced Friday and fight the trade war to the end, in the face of the U.S.’s failure to keep its promises, the state-run People’s Daily wrote in a Saturday editorial.Later, the influential Chinese journalist Hu Xijin said on Twitter that the U.S. is “starting to lose China.”On Friday, Beijing unveiled plans to impose additional tariffs on $75 billion of U.S. goods, including soybeans, automobiles and oil. The nation will “walk the talk” in implementing its third round of retaliatory measures, according to the newspaper.China has been forced into countermeasures by U.S. unilateralism and trade protectionism, the paper said, adding that Washington has been erratic in imposing tariffs on China and has shown “amnesia” in honoring its promises.Trade tensions between the two nations escalated on Friday after President Donald Trump said he’s raising tariffs on Chinese imports in response to the measures announced by Beijing. Anticipation of Trump’s actions, which were foreshadowed by a series of angry tweets, sent global stock markets reeling.Tariffs RisingExisting U.S. duties on $250 billion of Chinese imports will rise to 30% from 25% on Oct. 1, while a planned 10% tariff on a further $300 billion in Chinese goods will jump to 15%, starting with the first tranche on Sept. 1, Trump said in tweets Friday.China’s Ministry of Commerce issued a strongly-worded statement on Saturday saying the U.S. was involved in “unilateral and bullying trade protectionism” that puts the normal international trade order at risk.Trump, for his part, suggested in an overnight tweet that he was looking at the “Emergency Economic Powers Act of 1977” in ordering U.S. companies to quit China. “Case close!” Trump concluded.That measure -- technically, the International Emergency Economic Powers Act -- gives U.S. presidents wide latitude to regulate international commerce at times of national emergencies. It’s unclear how Trump could use the law in the current situation to have U.S. companies bend to his will.Hu, editor-in-chief of the Global Times, a tabloid newspaper controlled by China’s ruling Communist Party, accurately predicted the timing of China’s retaliatory tariffs on Friday.On Saturday, he said China “has ‘lost’ the U.S. already,” citing high tariffs, the ban on telecoms company Huawei Technologies Co. Ltd., political hostility, and actions toward Hong Kong and Taiwan. “We’re facing a completely different United States. We have nothing more to lose, while the US is just starting to lose China,” Xu said.While the Global Times doesn’t necessarily reflect the view of Chinese leaders, Hu has said the paper voices opinions that official sources can’t.Hu earlier tweeted that if U.S. automakers heed Trump’s Friday call for “major American companies” to desert China, they would be giving up the market to Japanese and German brands. “Go back to the US, let each American family have 20 cars,” he tweeted, followed by a smiley face.U.S. importers and retailers decried the latest moves by Trump.“These escalating tariffs are the worst economic mistake since the Smoot-Hawley Tariff Act of 1930 -- a decision that catapulted our country into the Great Depression,” Gary Shapiro, president and CEO of the Consumer Technology Association, said in a statement.(Updates with China’s Commerce Ministry, CTA comment from seventh paragraph.)To contact Bloomberg News staff for this story: Evelyn Yu in Shanghai at yyu263@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Sam Mamudi at smamudi@bloomberg.net, Ros Krasny, Steve GeimannFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


Man flees police on mobility scooter in low-speed chase as onlookers cheer 'Go old man!'

Man flees police on mobility scooter in low-speed chase as onlookers cheer 'Go old man!'The video shows Charlie Durham, a double amputee, speeding on his scooter as a police officer attempted to pull him over in New Zealand.


Lawsuit: Ex-Citadel staffer drugged, sexually abused cadet

Lawsuit: Ex-Citadel staffer drugged, sexually abused cadetA student at The Citadel sued an ex-instructor who he says agreed not to discipline him in exchange for sex. Former Citadel Lt. Col. Kenneth Boes was charged last year with sexually assaulting the cadet, but prosecutors dropped those charges for reasons that aren't explained in online court records. Boes' lawyer on Friday described the cadet as a false victim and violent young man who wants to make a quick buck at the expense of a man with an impeccable reputation.


Woman finds venomous spider in her ear after mistaking it for water

Woman finds venomous spider in her ear after mistaking it for waterThe discomfort in Susie Torres’ left ear felt like the water that can get stuck there after swimming. She heard swooshing when she woke up on Tuesday and assumed it had been caused by an allergy shot.Torres, of Kansas City, Missouri, discovered she was wrong when doctors extracted a dime-sized, venomous brown recluse spider, Fox 4 News reported.


Man Who Stopped to 'Assist' Woman Having Car Trouble Accused of Sexually Assaulting Her

Man Who Stopped to 'Assist' Woman Having Car Trouble Accused of Sexually Assaulting HerPolice in Monroe County, Indiana are working to identify a suspect in a rape case.


UPDATE 3-Saudi-led coalition says downs Houthi drone fired at airbase

UPDATE 3-Saudi-led coalition says downs Houthi drone fired at airbaseA Saudi-led military coalition fighting the Houthis in Yemen said it downed a drone on Sunday that the Iran-aligned group has said they launched in the direction of a Saudi airbase. "The coalition forces intercepted and downed a drone launched from the city of Sanaa in the direction of Khamis Muchait's residential neighbourhoods," coalition spokesman Colonel Turki al-Malki told the official Saudi Press Agency. A Houthi military spokesman cited by the group's Al-Masirah TV earlier said the group had launched drones targeting the control towers of the Abha airport and the Khamis Mushait airbase, both in the southwest of the kingdom.


N. Korea tests new 'super-large' multiple rocket launcher

N. Korea tests new 'super-large' multiple rocket launcherNorth Korea said Sunday leader Kim Jong Un supervised the test-firing of a "newly developed super-large multiple rocket launcher," another demonstration of its expanding weapons arsenal apparently aimed at increasing its leverage ahead of a possible resumption of nuclear talks with the U.S. Kim underscored the need to "continue to step up the development of Korean-style strategic and tactical weapons for resolutely frustrating the ever-mounting military threats and pressure offensive of the hostile forces," according to the KCNA. The "hostile forces" likely referred to the United States and South Korea, whose recently ended regular military drills infuriated North Korea.


Ex-wife, children of Atlanta surgeon Christopher Edwards found dead in apparent murder-suicide

Ex-wife, children of Atlanta surgeon Christopher Edwards found dead in apparent murder-suicideAuthorities say they believe Marsha Edwards shot Christopher Edwards Jr. and Erin Edwards before turning the gun on herself.


Police are trying to arrest their way out of a mass shooting epidemic, and experts warn that law enforcement can't shoulder the entire burden

Police are trying to arrest their way out of a mass shooting epidemic, and experts warn that law enforcement can't shoulder the entire burdenThe arrests won't fully or permanently stop a person determined to inflict mass death — and the US is nowhere near close to tackling the root causes.


UK Hong Kong consulate worker Simon Cheng freed after detention in mainland China

UK Hong Kong consulate worker Simon Cheng freed after detention in mainland ChinaA British consulate employee in Hong Kong has been freed by China after being detained for 15 days on the mainland amid rising tensions between the former British colony and Beijing. Simon Cheng, 28, a trade and investment officer at the Hong Kong consulate’s Scottish Development International section, went missing on August 8 on his way back from a work trip in Shenzhen, a neighbouring Chinese city.  It was not until after the UK expressed “extreme concern” about his disappearance that China’s foreign ministry broke its silence, confirming Mr Cheng had been detained without releasing further details.  On Saturday, his family announced that he had come back. "Simon has returned to Hong Kong; thanks you everyone for your support! Simon and his family wish to have some time to rest and recover, and will not take any interview,” they said in a statement.   An activist holds an illustration of Simon Cheng during a gathering outside the British Consulate-General building in Hong Kong  Credit: AFP Chinese police in Shenzhen confirmed that Mr Cheng had been detained for violating public security management regulations, and was released after that period on Saturday.  Police also said he had “confessed to the facts of his illegal activity,” without saying what those activities were. Mr Cheng was not formally charged or tried in court, and his family rejected allegations in Chinese state media that he had been detained for visiting prostitutes.  On Friday the UK issued a warning to all travellers to Hong Kong about increased scrutiny from mainland authorities at border crossings. The warning added that mobile phones and electronic devices were being checked by border patrol. Mr Cheng’s mysterious disappearance highlights China’s murky legal and judicial system – something that help kicked off mass protests early June in Hong Kong. Many fear freedoms enjoyed in Hong Kong, guaranteed for at least 50 years under an agreement that became effective when the former British colony was returned to Beijing, are fast-disappearing under China’s ruling Communist Party.  Hong Kong crisis | Comment and analysis Millions first took to the streets against a now-suspended extradition proposal that would have sent people to face trial in mainland China, where Communist Party control of the courts contributes to a 99.9 per cent conviction rate. Forced confessions are also common with suspects paraded on state television. “What happened to Simong Cheng – this is a common tactic used by the central government to put pressure on people,” said Kammy Yang, 50, an office clerk at a protest on Saturday. “Many Chinese activists were accused of prostitution or tax scams; this is their strategy in China, trying to suppress freedom.” Thousands of protesters on Saturday engaged in a series of skirmishes, throwing projectiles from bricks to petrol bombs at police who responded with sprays of tear gas and rubber bullets. It was the first time tear gas had been deployed in 10 days, a period of relative calm as protesters recalibrated their approach in an otherwise tumultuous, violent summer.  Demonstrators join hands to form a human chain during the Hong Kong Way event in the Central district of Hong Kong, China, on Friday Credit: Bloomberg “The reasons why protesters are building roadblocks, surrounding police stations, and throwing bricks – it’s because the government doesn’t respond to us,” said Vaso Chan, 28, an office clerk. “It’s not fun for any of us to come out during summer break.” Protesters spray painted slogans like “Give me liberty or death,” Chinazi,” and “HK popo Gestapo,” on sidewalks and highways. As the political movement has grown, so have protesters’ demands, who are now calling for an independent inquiry into police handling of the protests, the resignation of Hong Kong chief executive Carrie Lam, and direct leadership elections.  City leaders however have made no concessions, instead thrusting the police to the front lines to handle the situation, further angering protesters.  Demonstrations are occurring nearly every day now in the financial hub, disrupting traffic and public transportation. On Saturday, several stations closed along a planned march route. But despite growing unrest, public support for the protesters has stayed strong, with marches and strikes planned through September. “No matter whether those protesters are peaceful protesters or protesters that are standing in the ‘front lines’, no matter what they do, we will support them,” said Mr Chan.


VIDEO: 2 trans women, gay man ejected from DTLA bar after alleged altercation with other group

VIDEO: 2 trans women, gay man ejected from DTLA bar after alleged altercation with other groupTwo transgender women who were forcibly removed from a downtown L.A. bar say security guards used excessive force after they were allegedly verbally attacked with transphobic slurs.


20 of the Craziest Pickup Trucks Ever

20 of the Craziest Pickup Trucks Ever


Trump claim doctors treating mass shooting victims 'were coming out of operating rooms' to meet him dismissed by hospitals

Trump claim doctors treating mass shooting victims 'were coming out of operating rooms' to meet him dismissed by hospitalsTwo hospitals have denied Donald Trump’s claim doctors “were coming out of operating rooms” to meet him when he travelled to Texas and Ohio to console victims of two mass shootings."At no time did, or would, physicians or staff leave active operating rooms during the presidential visit,” University Medical Center (UMC) spokesperson Ryan Mielke told local TV station KVIA. “Our priority is always patient care."


Journalist killed in Mexico

Journalist killed in MexicoThe head of a Mexican news website was found stabbed to death in the center of the country, authorities said Saturday, the 10th such killing this year. The body of Nevith Condes Jaramillo "was found Saturday morning... showing injuries from a sharp object," the state prosecutor said in a statement. Condes Jaramillo, 42, was the head of a local news site in Tejupilco and was also an announcer on a community radio station.


Russia's Chechnya inaugurates what it says is Europe's largest mosque

Russia's Chechnya inaugurates what it says is Europe's largest mosqueAuthorities in the Russian region of Chechnya on Friday inaugurated what they said was the largest mosque in Europe in a pomp-filled ceremony attended by local and foreign officials. Named after the Prophet Mohammed, the marble-decorated mosque has capacity for more than 30,000 people and has been described by the Chechen authorities as the "largest and most beautiful" mosque in Europe. Chechen leader Ramzan Kadyrov, an ally of President Vladimir Putin, said the mosque -- located in Shali, a town of 54,000 just outside the regional capital Grozny -- was "unique in its design, and majestic in its size and beauty".


The Latest: Harris gets warm welcome at California meeting

The Latest: Harris gets warm welcome at California meetingCalifornia Sen. Kamala Harris is getting a rousing hometown welcome at the Democratic National Committee summer meeting in San Francisco. Harris is looking to California as a potentially key part of her path to the Democratic presidential nomination. With scores of supporters in the gallery Friday, Harris harkened back to her first political race for district attorney.


A man was training to get a gun permit. The instructor accidentally shot him, police say

A man was training to get a gun permit. The instructor accidentally shot him, police sayThe instructor, a Riverside County Sheriff's Department trainer, accidentally shot a student attending the class to get a concealed weapons permit.


A man with schizophrenia was found guilty of murdering a Saint Augustine's University student in 1979. 40 years later, a panel of judges decided he's innocent after all.

A man with schizophrenia was found guilty of murdering a Saint Augustine's University student in 1979. 40 years later, a panel of judges decided he's innocent after all.Blackmon's lawyers argued he was tricked by police and prosecutors into falsely confessing to a crime he didn't commit.


A floating nuclear plant in Russia features a gym, bar, and pool. An expert calls it 'Chernobyl on ice.'

A floating nuclear plant in Russia features a gym, bar, and pool. An expert calls it 'Chernobyl on ice.'Environmental activists worry about the perils of placing nuclear reactors at sea, where they could be vulnerable to climate-related disasters.


Metal detectorist finds £10,000 gold ring in garage 40 years after discarding it as worthless

Metal detectorist finds £10,000 gold ring in garage 40 years after discarding it as worthlessA metal detectorist who discarded a gold ring in his garage for 40 years after a museum told him it was worthless has discovered its real value is £10,000. Tom Clark, 81, dug up the buried treasure while scanning an area of farmland near Aylesbury, Buckinghamshire, in 1979, then put it inside a metal tin and forgot about it. But the retired leather craftsman came across the rare seal ring eight years ago while sorting through items from his mother's house after she passed away. He got the item valued and was astonished to discover that it was actually a 670-year-old medieval artefact dating back to 1350. It is due to be auctioned off in Derbyshire on Tuesday (Aug 27) and is expected to sell for between £8,500 and £10,000. The turn of events is similar to the plot of BBC sitcom Only Fools and Horses, when brothers Del and Rodney come across a watch in their garage which is then auctioned off for millions of pounds. Mr Clark said: "I had completely forgotten about it. At the time I'd only been metal detecting for 10 years and didn't realise the ring was anything special. It was all twisted and broken when I dug it up." He took the rare ring along with some others to a museum to have them valued at the time, but was told they were all fairly modern. "I put them all in a tin and left them in the garage at my mother's house," he said. "A few months ago, I was sorting through some stuff in my own garage that had come from my mother's house and there it was - the tin with the rings in it." Tom is auctioning off the ring, which is expected to make between £8,500 and £10,000 Credit: Hansons / SWNS/Hansons / SWNS Mr Clark, now a much more experienced collector, said he instantly knew it was a seal ring dating back to the 1300s and would have belonged to someone important given its decoration and quality. He added: "It's rare and elegant. I'd love to know who it belonged to." A Latin inscription on the ring translates as 'I hide the true message'. Mark Becher, Historica expert at auctioneer Hansons, said: "It's a fascinating piece of medieval jewellery and I'm delighted Tom rediscovered again after all these years."


Police Arrest 29 as Protesters Cause Damage: Hong Kong Update

Police Arrest 29 as Protesters Cause Damage: Hong Kong Update(Bloomberg) -- Hong Kong police fired tear gas and arrested 29 people on Saturday after protesters occupied roads, set up barricades and hurled projectiles in the 12th week of unrest in the Asian financial center.At least two more rallies were taking place on Sunday, including one organized by relatives of police officers, who have been criticized for using excessive force to quell protests. Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam held a meeting on Saturday with former officials and other prominent people to find a way out of the impasse that has rocked the former British colony.Demonstrators are looking to maintain momentum after large but peaceful protests last weekend temporarily broke a pattern of tear gas and police clashes. They formed a human chain across the city on Friday, while a plan to disrupt airport transportation services on Saturday wasn’t successful. Historic mass marches opposing legislation easing extraditions to China began peacefully in June, and have since widened into a broader movement against Beijing’s increasing grip.Key Developments:Police arrested more than two dozen protesters on SaturdayChief Executive Lam seeks to build a dialogue platform to address roots of discontentU.K. consulate staffer Simon Cheng was released by China on Saturday after more than two weeks of detentionHere’s the latest:Rain march (Sunday 2 p.m.)People took cover from the persistent rain and filled the stands and pitch of the Kwai Chung sports stadium, the starting point for Sunday’s rally. The march from the stadium was granted late-night approval after organizers appealed an earlier objection by authorities.“The rainy weather is good for the protesters but it’s bad for the police, who are wearing heavy gear. It also makes their tear gas ineffective,” said Gloria Mak, a 25-year-old assistant to a Japanese company.Train service suspended (Sunday 11.30 a.m.)MTR Corp., operator of Hong Kong’s rail network, suspended train service to stations near the planned Tsuen Wan march. The company said in a statement that the Kwai Fong, Tsuen Wan and Tai Wo Hau stations would be closed from 1.30 p.m. until further notice.On Saturday, MTR suspended service on parts of its Kwun Tong line because of protests in the area.Operations Director Adi Lau Tin-shing said the current situation was the company’s biggest challenge in its 40 years of operation and that the station closures were an unavoidable decision taken on the grounds of safety.Police condemn ‘radical’ behavior (Sunday, 3:02 a.m.)Police said “radical protesters” in Saturday’s clashes used electric saws to damage a number of smart lampposts, and hurled hard objects, bricks and petrol bombs at officers. They arrested 19 men and 10 women, aged between 17 and 52, for offenses including the possession of offensive weapons and assaulting police officers, the police said in a statement.Bricks and bamboo poles (Saturday 4:20 p.m.)Police fired tear gas to break up demonstrators blocking a road in the Kwung Tong area. Protesters were seen breaking bricks into smaller pieces and using bamboo poles to keep police from getting close to a barricade they erected. Elsewhere, video footage showed a so-called smart lamppost that was toppled and notes declaring “no totalitarian surveillance” were pasted on it.Protesters split up from the authorized march route and some regathered in the neighborhood of Wong Tai Sin, the scene of clashes earlier this month. Police fired tear gas and made arrests after the demonstrators blocked off roads and disrupted traffic.Lam seeks dialogue platform (Saturday 3:10 p.m.)About 30 people were invited to the meeting organized by Lam in Government House, including ex-transport chief Anthony Cheung and Cardinal John Tong, the former bishop of Hong Kong, RTHK reported. Lam said the meeting was not a “dialogue platform” but a gathering to share ideas on how to build dialogue.“I do not expect dialogue to easily resolve the deadlock, stop demonstrations, or to provide solutions to problems,” she said in a Facebook post. “But continuing to fight is not the way out.”Cathay issues warning (3.30 p.m.)Cathay Pacific Airways Ltd. said it will not tolerate employees supporting or taking part in illegal protests ahead of “planned activities” by the Hong Kong Confederation of Trade Unions on Aug. 26.The Airport Authority Hong Kong obtained a High Court order to extend an interim injunction granted on Aug. 13 banning protesters from unlawfully obstructing access to the airport. That injunction covers Cathay City, “which is the operational hub for our global operations and as such includes facilities that are absolutely critical to our flight operations,” Cathay said in Saturday’s statement.Operations at the city’s airport were disrupted earlier this month when protesters occupied the building.U.K. Consulate Staffer Freed (10:39 a.m.)Chinese police released a U.K. consulate staffer from Hong Kong after more than two weeks in detention. Simon Cheng was set free on Saturday after he was held for violating the Public Security Administration Punishment Law, police in the southern Chinese city of Shenzhen said in a post on the Weibo social media platform. He failed to return home to Hong Kong from an Aug. 8 meeting in Shenzhen.Upcoming ScheduleThe weekend concludes with Sunday protests in the Tsuen Wan and Kwai Chung areas, starting mid-afternoon. Relatives of police also plan a march to the official residence of Chief Executive Lam in support of local law enforcement.\--With assistance from Justin Chin, Sheryl Tian Tong Lee and Venus Feng.To contact the reporters on this story: Kari Lindberg in Hong Kong at klindberg13@bloomberg.net;Annie Lee in Hong Kong at olee42@bloomberg.net;Aaron Mc Nicholas in Hong Kong at amcnicholas2@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Shamim Adam at sadam2@bloomberg.net, ;Brendan Scott at bscott66@bloomberg.net, Stanley James, Andrew JanesFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


Revered as a saint by online extremists, how Christchurch shooter inspired copycat terrorists around the world

Revered as a saint by online extremists, how Christchurch shooter inspired copycat terrorists around the world“Brenton Tarrant was a catalyst for me personally. He showed me that it could be done. And that it needed to be done.”Those were the words written by John Timothy Earnest shortly before he stormed a synagogue in Poway, California, and opened fire on the Jewish congregation.


South Korea begins annual war games to defend against Japan

South Korea begins annual war games to defend against JapanSouth Korea Sunday began two days of war games to practise defending disputed islands off its east coast against an unlikely attack from Japan, further stoking tensions between the Asian neighbours. The annual drills come just days after Seoul terminated a military intelligence-sharing pact with Tokyo, with the countries at loggerheads over Japan's use of forced labour during World War II. The two-day exercise will involve warships and aircraft, the South Korean navy said in a text message without providing more detail.


Trump's economic anxiety comes to a boil

Trump's economic anxiety comes to a boilThe president directs U.S. businesses to pull out of China, but maintains that the "economy is doing really well."


Chinese embassy says the US is trying to suppress Huawei

Chinese embassy says the US is trying to suppress HuaweiAn embassy statement to The Associated Press said the arrest of Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou in Canada at the request of U.S. authorities is "of course different" from China's detentions of Canadians Michael Kovrig and Michael Spavor. "The Meng Wanzhou incident is not just a judicial case, but the U.S. using state power to work with its certain ally to suppress a private high-tech Chinese enterprise on unwarranted charges.


Fast-moving wildfire erupts in California, forcing thousands to evacuate

Fast-moving wildfire erupts in California, forcing thousands to evacuateMountain fire races across hundreds of acres in just hours as wildfire season looms large over the stateThis photo provided by Cal Fire shows an aerial view of the Mountain Fire on 22 August. Photograph: APA fast-moving wildfire that broke out on Thursday in northern California has forced the evacuation of nearly 4,000 residents, racing across at least 600 acres within just a few hours, officials say. The Mountain fire, which erupted on the outskirts of a national forest in northern California, has threatened 1,110 homes and structures. As of Friday morning the fire was 40% contained , according to Cal Fire.The cause of the fire is under investigation.Photos of the blaze posted on Twitter by the Shasta county sheriff’s office showed thick black and gray smoke billowing into the area over a highway near the Shasta-Trinity national forest.“Jones Valley and Bella Vista area residents! This situation is very fluid and rapidly changing, if you do not see your road listed but feel you are in danger YOU MAY EVACUATE to Shasta College Gymnasium,” the sheriff’s department said in a separate tweet.The Mountain fire is threatening thousands of homes and forcing evacuations. Photograph: APThe Shasta College campus was closed along with Highway 299 and about a dozen smaller roads. Residents of small communities in the path of the flames were told to evacuate or be prepared to flee on short notice.California was hit by some of the deadliest and most destructive wildfires in a century last year and state officials have warned this year’s fire season could be similarly intense.The Camp fire, which broke out in Butte county in November and overran the town of Paradise, killed 86 people and left thousands of others homeless. State fire investigators determined that the Camp fire was sparked by Pacific Gas & Electric Co transmission lines.The Mountain fire broke out on the same day that Bernie Sanders, the senator and Democratic presidential candidate, unveiled his $16.3tn climate change plan and toured Paradise, which he called a “wake-up call for our entire nation”.“Climate change is a major, major crisis for our country, and the entire world, and one of the manifestations of that crisis is what happened here,” Sanders said as he walked through a burned-out mobile home park in Paradise alongside people who lost their homes in last November’s deadly blaze.


Former police officer charged with murder for botched Houston raid

Former police officer charged with murder for botched Houston raidProsecutors are reviewing 14,000 criminal cases involving the drug squad that conducted the raid for evidence of improprieties, Harris County District Attorney Kim Ogg told a news conference. In January, then police officer Gerald Goines wrote in an affidavit to obtain a search warrant that an informant had bought heroin at the house, Ogg said. On Jan. 28, Goines and his Houston narcotics squad entered the house without knocking, as allowed under the warrant.


An innocent man spent months in jail after customs officials thought honey he brought back from Jamaica was liquid meth

An innocent man spent months in jail after customs officials thought honey he brought back from Jamaica was liquid methLeon Haughton told The Washington Post he was jailed for 82 days after customs officials in Baltimore alleged that the three jars of honey were meth.


Democratic presidential candidates have a new approach for tackling gun violence: Treat it as a public-health crisis

Democratic presidential candidates have a new approach for tackling gun violence: Treat it as a public-health crisisCandidates like Elizabeth Warren and Cory Booker want to draw on tactics used by community-based organizations to fight gun violence.


Cathay Pacific cabin crew union leader fired as Hong Kongers warn of spread of 'white terror'

Cathay Pacific cabin crew union leader fired as Hong Kongers warn of spread of 'white terror'Cathay Pacific fired a cabin crew union leader on Friday, the latest casualty in a fast-spreading “white terror” as mass protests in Hong Kong continue into their third month.  Rebecca Sy, head of the Cathay Dragon flight attendant’s association, said she lost her job of 17 years, without explanation,  after managers saw and confirmed her Facebook account,  which included messages in favour of the protests. “All the employees are being frightened, not just cabin crews, but even the management,” Ms Sy told reporters. “My colleagues are all terrified because of its white terror.” “White terror” is a term used to describe a slew of events that create a climate of fear particularly as companies and employees worry of serious repercussions for voicing their views. Her departure follows a surprise resignation last week by CEO Rupert Hogg, reported first by Chinese state media, underlining the political nature of the decision. Cathay has borne the brunt of Beijing’s anger as authorities look to punish companies with any link to the Hong Kong protests - a direct challenge to the power of the Communist Party. Rebecca Sy was dismissed from her position as flight attendant for Cathay Pacific's subsidiary Cathay Dragon Credit: ANTHONY WALLACE/AFP/Getty Images In the crackdown, companies and employees could face serious repercussions for voicing their views. Hong Kong subway operator MTR has also come under fire for arranging additional trains to allow protesters to travel home, accused of “colluding with rioters” in Chinese state media.  Beijing authorities have long put the squeeze on companies over political issues by encouraging its 1.4 billion citizens to snub various brands or by throwing up a number of regulatory roadblocks – a move that can have devastating consequences for even the biggest firms. Simon Cheng, 28, a British consular official in Hong Kong and permanent resident of the city has been detained for two weeks in mainland China for allegedly visiting prostitutes.  Under Chinese law, Mr Cheng should have been released today after a 15-day administrative period but at time of publication he was still in detention. Hong Kong police said on Friday that they did not know Mr Cheng's whereabouts.  Protests in Hong Kong first kicked off over an extradition proposal that would have exposed people to China’s murky legal and judicial system, where authorities have also in the past detained foreigners to express political displeasure. Two Canadians - Michael Kovrig, a former diplomat, and Michael Spavor, an entrepreneur - were detained in China last year during Beijing’s diplomatic dispute with Ottawa over its arrest of Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou. It is widely viewed that both men - who are still being held and have been charged with spying – are being used as political pawns. Hong Kong protests | Read more A number of multinationals operating in Hong Kong have sought to stress their political neutrality to avoid their businesses being targeted and to protect staff from arbitrary detention.  Earlier this week, the world’s “big four” accounting firms came under attack after an anonymous group claiming to be made up of their employees took out a full-page newspaper advertisement to express support for protests in Hong Kong and condemn the firms for remaining silent on the issue. Deloitte, Ernst & Young, KPMG and Pricewaterhouse Coopers all sought to distance themselves from the advertisement, saying it didn’t represent the companies’ views. But Chinese state media had already seized on the situation, calling for the firms to identify and sack the employees behind the ad. FinnAir has also issued a warning to staff to remember to “keep work and politics separate,” reported the South China Morning Post, over concerns that any link to the protests might lead to a customer backlash or flight cancellations in China, its second-largest market for long-haul travel.   “China is obviously putting pressure on companies to ensure that they all hold the same political views,” said Keenan Chuk, 30, a finance manager who attended a lunchtime rally or accountants in Hong Kong’s central business district Friday.  “I am concerned that I will be fired,” he said, adding that “we still have to fight for our rights.” Even universities have warned students against discussing politics and participating in rallies.  “In a modern society, education should be free from politics so as to alleviate the escalation of anxiety and avoid the divisive society caused by chaos,” according to a statement from the City University of Hong Kong issued earlier this month. A woman said she experienced at a police station during her detention in Hong Kong Credit: REUTERS/Thomas Peter Some banks are also now taking precautionary measures, purchasing full page ads in newspapers to affirm their support for the government. Edwin, 26, an accountant who declined to give his last name, said senior partners in his firm had invited junior employees to lunch that day in an attempt to dissuade people from attending Friday’s protest.  But he participated in the demonstration anyway, turning up again in the evening to join a human chain meant to evoke the Baltic Way, when two million lined up across three countries to protest Soviet rule in 1989.  “In the industry, we switch firms quite often,” he shrugged. Hong Kong police came under renewed pressure on Friday when officers were accused of conducting an unnecessary strip search on a female protester. The alleged victim appeared at a press conference dressed in all black with a black face mask, cap and sunglasses. Facing the cameras in front of a "MeToo" sign, she claimed she was arrested weeks ago at a protest against the now-abandoned extradition bill and was admitted to hospital for injuries she suffered that night. By her account, one officer patted her thighs with a pen, instructing her to open her legs wider after ordering her to take off all her clothes in a police cell. The police said their body search procedures had not changed during the recent outbreak of citywide protests.


Iceland Held Talks With U.S. Ambassador Over Pence Visit

Iceland Held Talks With U.S. Ambassador Over Pence Visit(Bloomberg) -- Iceland’ prime minister is open to a meeting with Vice President Mike Pence during his trip to the Nordic island, should the visit be extended.The option was discussed during a pre-scheduled meeting on Friday between Katrin Jakobsdottir and ambassador Jeffrey Gunter, a government spokesman told Bloomberg.Jakobsdottir, a left-of-center feminist and LGBT advocate, is due to attend a conference by Nordic trade union leaders in Sweden on Sept. 4. That’s the same day in which Pence is due to arrive.Jakobsdottir’s decision to not change her schedule to accommodate the vice president’s visit has been criticized at home.Olaf­ur Hardar­son, a professor of political science at the University of Iceland, told local media Morgunbladid it would be “unusual” for the prime minister not to greet the American vice president.According to her spokeswoman, a final decision on whether the meeting can take place has not yet been made.The White House said Pence planned to discuss trade opportunities, the Arctic and NATO efforts to counter Russian aggression in the region.The scheduling snafu is the latest episode in a series of exchanges involving Donald Trump and the Nordics.Pence’s visit would take place in the wake of a very public spat between the U.S. president and Denmark over its refusal to sell Greenland.Trump said Saturday he had held a “nice” conversation with Mette Frederiksen, with the exchange coming just days after labeling the Danish prime minister as “nasty.”In 2017, Sweden reacted forcibly to Trump’s portrayal of the Nordic nation as being in a state of chaos and overrun by crime after an influx of refugees.(Adds quote in fifth paragraph.)To contact the reporter on this story: Ragnhildur Sigurdardottir in Reykjavik at rsigurdardot@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Jonas Bergman at jbergman@bloomberg.net, Nick Rigillo, Andrew DavisFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


Fear grips Bangladesh camp as 2 Rohingya refugees killed

Fear grips Bangladesh camp as 2 Rohingya refugees killedBangladesh police said they had shot dead two Rohingya refugees during a gunfight in a refugee camp on Saturday after the pair were accused of killing a ruling party official. Nearly a million Rohingya live in squalid camps in southeast Bangladesh, 740,000 of whom fled a 2017 military offensive against the Muslim minority in Myanmar. The incident comes two days after a second failed attempt to repatriate the refugees, which saw not a single Rohingya turn up to return across the border to conflict-scarred Rakhine state.


Dow, stocks dive off Trump's latest comments on US-China trade war

Dow, stocks dive off Trump's latest comments on US-China trade warStocks fell sharply on Wall Street Friday after President Donald Trump called on U.S. companies to consider alternatives to doing business in China


All the Best Le Creuset Deals During Williams Sonoma Warehouse Sale

All the Best Le Creuset Deals During Williams Sonoma Warehouse Sale


Russian doctor has trace of radiation after explosion

Russian doctor has trace of radiation after explosionMore than 100 Russian medical workers who helped treat victims of a recent mysterious explosion at a military testing range have undergone checks and one man has been found with a trace of radiation, officials said Friday. It was followed by a brief rise in radiation levels in nearby Severodvinsk, but the authorities insisted it didn't pose any danger. The Arkhangelsk regional administration said Friday that 110 medical workers have undergone checks that one man was found with a low amount of radioactive cesium-137 in his muscle tissue.


Serial killer linked to dozens of U.S. murders pleads guilty to two more

Serial killer linked to dozens of U.S. murders pleads guilty to two moreThe date of the Jane Doe killing is unknown but is believed to have occurred sometime between 1980 and 1999. The 79-year-old defendant appeared in Cincinnati's Hamilton County Court via Skype from California State Prison in Los Angeles County and sat with his hands folded in a wheelchair, responding "Yes, ma'am" when Judge Melba Marsh asked if he waived his right to a trial by jury. "He said he specifically looked for people who would not be missed," Chief Assistant Prosecutor Mark Piepmeier told the judge.


Watch Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez play with a penguin because it's pure, uncut goodness

Watch Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez play with a penguin because it's pure, uncut goodnessThe world can be a cruel, unforgiving place. But, somehow, watching Congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez play and dance with a penguin makes everything just a little bit better. Even if only for a moment. On Saturday, Ocasio-Cortez tweeted a video of herself and her flipper-sporting friend engaged in a round of what looks to be playful dance. Seriously, it's adorable. The penguin is all the way in."A new day, a new friend," Ocasio-Cortez wrote of her encounter. Importantly, Ocasio-Cortez is not roaming around Antarctica. Rather, she appears to be in a science museum or zoo. The display next to the penguin enclosure includes facts about African Penguins -- which have a home in the Maryland Zoo, among other places.SEE ALSO: Australian strangers engage in weird, elaborate feud over their coffeeshop fandom"The Maryland Zoo maintains the largest colony of African penguins in North America," the Zoo helpfully notes on its website for all you penguin heads out there.Regardless of the specific location, we're totally in. Now excuse us while we play this video on repeat to drown out the world's sorrows.  WATCH: A prehistoric human-sized penguin has been discovered in New Zealand


A youth sports organization is raffling off a semi-automatic weapon to help its cheerleading and football teams

A youth sports organization is raffling off a semi-automatic weapon to help its cheerleading and football teamsAs a result of the controversy, the president of the organization said he is considering doing away with the rifle raffle for future fundraisers.


Cathay flight attendant says fired over Facebook posts on HK protests

Cathay flight attendant says fired over Facebook posts on HK protestsA flight attendant on Friday accused Cathay Pacific of summarily firing her over Facebook posts linked to Hong Kong's political crisis, adding to concerns about a China-driven witch-hunt to root out pro-democracy supporters at major firms. The Hong Kong-based airline has been accused of bowing to political and commercial pressure from Beijing by sacking employees in recent weeks for their public support for the massive anti-government movement roiling Hong Kong. Earlier this month, China's aviation authority ordered Cathay Pacific to stop pro-democracy supporters among its 27,000 staff from working on flights to -- or over -- China, after a general strike drew out some of its workers.


Man Throws Brick at Woman's Head in One of Several Random NYC Attacks

Man Throws Brick at Woman's Head in One of Several Random NYC AttacksA man has attacked at least four people in random Manhattan attacks this August, police said.


Qantas to test 'ultra long-haul' Sydney to NY, London flights

Qantas to test 'ultra long-haul' Sydney to NY, London flightsQantas on Thursday said it will run "ultra long-haul" test flights in the coming months from New York and London to Sydney in order to assess the health of pilots and passengers, as it eyes commercial services on the marathon routes. Qantas last year introduced the first direct service from the western Australian city of Perth to London, with the 17-hour journey one of the longest passenger flights in the world. "Flying non-stop from the East Coast of Australia to London and New York is truly the final frontier in aviation, so we're determined to do all the groundwork to get this right," Qantas CEO Alan Joyce said in a statement.


Pompeo says Huawei CEO is not a bargaining chip in Trump-China trade war

Pompeo says Huawei CEO is not a bargaining chip in Trump-China trade warMike Pompeo has rejected claims that detained Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou is being used for leverage in the US-China trade war. Speaking with his Canadian counterpart, Chrystia Freeland, in Ottawa on Thursday, the US secretary of state appeared to rule out dropping the extradition request for Ms Meng to ease tensions with Beijing, insisting it is a legal matter. In December, US president Donald Trump implied he might intervene in the case to help secure a trade deal with China. “Whatever’s good for this country, I would do,” he said at the time. The US alleges Ms Meng – the Chinese technology company’s chief financial officer and the daughter of its chief executive – helped  Huawei circumvent sanctions on Iran. According to Vancouver court documents released this week, she told a Canadian border official that the company has an office in Iran. The US has charged Ms Meng, 47, with bank fraud, wire fraud and conspiracy to commit both. She is currently on bail living under house arrest in one of her Vancouver mansions while her lawyers fight her extradition to the US. Asked on Thursday if she is a “bargaining chip” in US-China trade talks, Mr Pompeo replied simply: “No.” Since Ms Meng’s arrest in Vancouver airport on a US arrest warrant in December, ties between Ottawa and Beijing have fallen to a historically low ebb. Two Canadians, businessman Michael Svapor and former diplomat Michael Kovrig, were arrested and charged with espionage shortly afterwards in what is widely viewed as a reprisal by Beijing. “Our team is focussed on helping those two Canadians be released,” Mr Pompeo said later ahead of a meeting with Canadian prime minister Justin Trudeau. Mr Trump spoke directly to Chinese president Xi Jinping about their “arbitrary detention” in June, he told journalists. Mr Pompeo, 55, also slapped down a question comparing their confinement with that of Ms Meng, accusing the journalist of taking “the Chinese line”. Mr Pompeo was visiting Canada ahead of the G7 meeting in France, where relations with China will be discussed. On Friday, Beijing escalated the trade dispute, announcing fresh tariffs on US imports worth $75 billion (£61 billion).


Chinese buyers pull back from U.S. housing market, hurting home sales

Chinese buyers pull back from U.S. housing market, hurting home salesChinese investors are buying fewer U.S. homes because of money controls in China. That's lowering prices and giving U.S. buyers a better chance to buy


Rep. Steve King wants to make abortion point in 'softer way'

Rep. Steve King wants to make abortion point in 'softer way'Backed by supporters at a news conference in Des Moines, the Iowa Republican affirmed his belief that abortion should be outlawed with no exceptions for rape or incest. King faced criticism for his comment Aug. 14 that questioned whether there would be "any population of the world left" if not for births due to rape or incest. The remarks were condemned by numerous groups and individuals, including Republican and Democratic candidates seeking to oust King, Democratic presidential candidates as well as the Iowa Republican Party and Rep. Liz Cheney, the No. 3 Republican in House leadership.


Sitting Pretty

Sitting Pretty


Released from death row, then returned — forced to prove race discrimination a second time

Released from death row, then returned — forced to prove race discrimination a second timeCases before N.C. Supreme Court show link between slavery, Jim Crow and modern death penalty is as connected as 'ropes of the lynch-man's noose'


Israel hits Iranian force in Syria to stop 'killer drones': military

Israel hits Iranian force in Syria to stop 'killer drones': militaryJERUSALEM/DAMASCUS (Reuters) - Israeli aircraft on Saturday struck Iranian forces near Damascus that had been planning to launch "killer drones" at targets in Israel, an Israeli military spokesman said. "The strike targeted Iranian Quds Force operatives and Shiite militias which were preparing to advance attack plans targeting sites in Israel from within Syria over the last number of days," the military said in a statement. The elite Quds Force is the overseas arm of Iran's Revolutionary Guards (IRGC).


Britain sends another warship to Gulf

Britain sends another warship to GulfA third British warship is heading to the Gulf, the Royal Navy announced Saturday, amid heightened tensions in the region. Britain has already sent the HMS Kent to cover for frigate HMS Montrose while it undergoes maintenance in nearby Bahrain, and is now redirecting the Type 45 destroyer HMS Defender from its mission to the Pacific. Britain outraged Iran by seizing one of its tankers -- the Grace 1 -- on July 4 on suspicion it was carrying oil to Syria in violation of EU sanctions.


Kavanaugh’s High-School Classmate Sues HuffPost for Defamation

Kavanaugh’s High-School Classmate Sues HuffPost for DefamationA former high-school classmate of Supreme Court justice Brett Kavanaugh has filed suit against HuffPost over a “fabricated” report intended to detail the culture of debauchery at Georgetown Preparatory School during Kavanaugh's time there.HuffPost reporter Ashley Feinberg, now at Slate, published a report at the height of the Kavanaugh confirmation controversy entitled “Former Student: Brett Kavanaugh's Prep School Party Scene Was a ‘Free-For-All',” which purported to expose the degenerate culture that predominated at Georgetown Prep when Kavanaugh was a student. That hard-partying ethos supposedly culminated in the 1984 overdose death of David Kennedy, Robert F. Kennedy's son, in a Palm Beach hotel.Feinberg, citing one anonymous Georgetown Prep alumnus, wrote that “two students — David's brother Doug, and his friend Derrick Evans — had helped score the coke” that ultimately killed David. Evans, an African American professor and community activist, filed suit on Wednesday alleging that Feinberg failed to contact him and fabricated his role in David's death in her “zeal to create a sensational article about Judge Brett Kavanaugh’s years at [Georgetown Prep] and thereby drive traffic to [HuffPost's] website.”“Indeed, if Ms. Feinberg or her HuffPost editors had done even the most basic research of publicly available sources, she and they would have known, if they did not already know, that Mr. Evans actively assisted law enforcement in identifying and prosecuting the individuals who actually sold the illegal narcotics,” the lawsuit reads.HuffPost initially corrected the article after Doug Kennedy's employer, Fox News, sent a letter to the outlet rebutting its allegations.“This article previously stated incorrectly that Doug Kennedy was involved in helping his brother to purchase drugs in 1984. Kennedy was only sharing a room with Derrick Evans, who helped David purchase the drugs, according to an affidavit obtained by the New York Times. We regret the error,” reads a correction appended to the article just one day after it was published.While the correction exonerated Doug Kennedy it also further defamed Evans, according to the lawsuit.“The September 21 correction was another complete fabrication published by HuffPost with actual knowledge that both it and the original publication were false or in reckless disregard of the truth, again without ever attempting to contact Mr. Evans for comment,” the lawsuit reads. “As HuffPost knew, there was NO affidavit reflecting that Mr. Evans ever helped anyone purchase illegal drugs. Defendants had no such affidavit in their possession, and they could not have had such an affidavit in their possession.”The original article has been significantly altered since its publication and, as of this writing, no longer contains any reference to David's death.The case, Evans v. Huffington Post.com Inc., is now pending in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Mississippi.


Ghost Particles Could Explain Just About Everything in the Universe

Ghost Particles Could Explain Just About Everything in the UniverseYou might also know them by their other name: neutrinos.


U.S. ‘Starting to Lose China,’ Says Global Times’ Hu Xijin

U.S. ‘Starting to Lose China,’ Says Global Times’ Hu Xijin(Bloomberg) -- Terms of Trade is a daily newsletter that untangles a world embroiled in trade wars. Sign up here. China will follow through with retaliatory measures announced Friday and fight the trade war to the end, in the face of the U.S.’s failure to keep its promises, the state-run People’s Daily wrote in a Saturday editorial.Later, the influential Chinese journalist Hu Xijin said on Twitter that the U.S. is “starting to lose China.”On Friday, Beijing unveiled plans to impose additional tariffs on $75 billion of U.S. goods, including soybeans, automobiles and oil. The nation will “walk the talk” in implementing its third round of retaliatory measures, according to the newspaper.China has been forced into countermeasures by U.S. unilateralism and trade protectionism, the paper said, adding that Washington has been erratic in imposing tariffs on China and has shown “amnesia” in honoring its promises.Trade tensions between the two nations escalated on Friday after President Donald Trump said he’s raising tariffs on Chinese imports in response to the measures announced by Beijing. Anticipation of Trump’s actions, which were foreshadowed by a series of angry tweets, sent global stock markets reeling.Tariffs RisingExisting U.S. duties on $250 billion of Chinese imports will rise to 30% from 25% on Oct. 1, while a planned 10% tariff on a further $300 billion in Chinese goods will jump to 15%, starting with the first tranche on Sept. 1, Trump said in tweets Friday.China’s Ministry of Commerce issued a strongly-worded statement on Saturday saying the U.S. was involved in “unilateral and bullying trade protectionism” that puts the normal international trade order at risk.Trump, for his part, suggested in an overnight tweet that he was looking at the “Emergency Economic Powers Act of 1977” in ordering U.S. companies to quit China. “Case close!” Trump concluded.That measure -- technically, the International Emergency Economic Powers Act -- gives U.S. presidents wide latitude to regulate international commerce at times of national emergencies. It’s unclear how Trump could use the law in the current situation to have U.S. companies bend to his will.Hu, editor-in-chief of the Global Times, a tabloid newspaper controlled by China’s ruling Communist Party, accurately predicted the timing of China’s retaliatory tariffs on Friday.On Saturday, he said China “has ‘lost’ the U.S. already,” citing high tariffs, the ban on telecoms company Huawei Technologies Co. Ltd., political hostility, and actions toward Hong Kong and Taiwan. “We’re facing a completely different United States. We have nothing more to lose, while the US is just starting to lose China,” Xu said.While the Global Times doesn’t necessarily reflect the view of Chinese leaders, Hu has said the paper voices opinions that official sources can’t.Hu earlier tweeted that if U.S. automakers heed Trump’s Friday call for “major American companies” to desert China, they would be giving up the market to Japanese and German brands. “Go back to the US, let each American family have 20 cars,” he tweeted, followed by a smiley face.U.S. importers and retailers decried the latest moves by Trump.“These escalating tariffs are the worst economic mistake since the Smoot-Hawley Tariff Act of 1930 -- a decision that catapulted our country into the Great Depression,” Gary Shapiro, president and CEO of the Consumer Technology Association, said in a statement.(Updates with China’s Commerce Ministry, CTA comment from seventh paragraph.)To contact Bloomberg News staff for this story: Evelyn Yu in Shanghai at yyu263@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Sam Mamudi at smamudi@bloomberg.net, Ros Krasny, Steve GeimannFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


Man flees police on mobility scooter in low-speed chase as onlookers cheer 'Go old man!'

Man flees police on mobility scooter in low-speed chase as onlookers cheer 'Go old man!'The video shows Charlie Durham, a double amputee, speeding on his scooter as a police officer attempted to pull him over in New Zealand.


Lawsuit: Ex-Citadel staffer drugged, sexually abused cadet

Lawsuit: Ex-Citadel staffer drugged, sexually abused cadetA student at The Citadel sued an ex-instructor who he says agreed not to discipline him in exchange for sex. Former Citadel Lt. Col. Kenneth Boes was charged last year with sexually assaulting the cadet, but prosecutors dropped those charges for reasons that aren't explained in online court records. Boes' lawyer on Friday described the cadet as a false victim and violent young man who wants to make a quick buck at the expense of a man with an impeccable reputation.


Woman finds venomous spider in her ear after mistaking it for water

Woman finds venomous spider in her ear after mistaking it for waterThe discomfort in Susie Torres’ left ear felt like the water that can get stuck there after swimming. She heard swooshing when she woke up on Tuesday and assumed it had been caused by an allergy shot.Torres, of Kansas City, Missouri, discovered she was wrong when doctors extracted a dime-sized, venomous brown recluse spider, Fox 4 News reported.


Man Who Stopped to 'Assist' Woman Having Car Trouble Accused of Sexually Assaulting Her

Man Who Stopped to 'Assist' Woman Having Car Trouble Accused of Sexually Assaulting HerPolice in Monroe County, Indiana are working to identify a suspect in a rape case.


UPDATE 3-Saudi-led coalition says downs Houthi drone fired at airbase

UPDATE 3-Saudi-led coalition says downs Houthi drone fired at airbaseA Saudi-led military coalition fighting the Houthis in Yemen said it downed a drone on Sunday that the Iran-aligned group has said they launched in the direction of a Saudi airbase. "The coalition forces intercepted and downed a drone launched from the city of Sanaa in the direction of Khamis Muchait's residential neighbourhoods," coalition spokesman Colonel Turki al-Malki told the official Saudi Press Agency. A Houthi military spokesman cited by the group's Al-Masirah TV earlier said the group had launched drones targeting the control towers of the Abha airport and the Khamis Mushait airbase, both in the southwest of the kingdom.


N. Korea tests new 'super-large' multiple rocket launcher

N. Korea tests new 'super-large' multiple rocket launcherNorth Korea said Sunday leader Kim Jong Un supervised the test-firing of a "newly developed super-large multiple rocket launcher," another demonstration of its expanding weapons arsenal apparently aimed at increasing its leverage ahead of a possible resumption of nuclear talks with the U.S. Kim underscored the need to "continue to step up the development of Korean-style strategic and tactical weapons for resolutely frustrating the ever-mounting military threats and pressure offensive of the hostile forces," according to the KCNA. The "hostile forces" likely referred to the United States and South Korea, whose recently ended regular military drills infuriated North Korea.


Ex-wife, children of Atlanta surgeon Christopher Edwards found dead in apparent murder-suicide

Ex-wife, children of Atlanta surgeon Christopher Edwards found dead in apparent murder-suicideAuthorities say they believe Marsha Edwards shot Christopher Edwards Jr. and Erin Edwards before turning the gun on herself.


Police are trying to arrest their way out of a mass shooting epidemic, and experts warn that law enforcement can't shoulder the entire burden

Police are trying to arrest their way out of a mass shooting epidemic, and experts warn that law enforcement can't shoulder the entire burdenThe arrests won't fully or permanently stop a person determined to inflict mass death — and the US is nowhere near close to tackling the root causes.


UK Hong Kong consulate worker Simon Cheng freed after detention in mainland China

UK Hong Kong consulate worker Simon Cheng freed after detention in mainland ChinaA British consulate employee in Hong Kong has been freed by China after being detained for 15 days on the mainland amid rising tensions between the former British colony and Beijing. Simon Cheng, 28, a trade and investment officer at the Hong Kong consulate’s Scottish Development International section, went missing on August 8 on his way back from a work trip in Shenzhen, a neighbouring Chinese city.  It was not until after the UK expressed “extreme concern” about his disappearance that China’s foreign ministry broke its silence, confirming Mr Cheng had been detained without releasing further details.  On Saturday, his family announced that he had come back. "Simon has returned to Hong Kong; thanks you everyone for your support! Simon and his family wish to have some time to rest and recover, and will not take any interview,” they said in a statement.   An activist holds an illustration of Simon Cheng during a gathering outside the British Consulate-General building in Hong Kong  Credit: AFP Chinese police in Shenzhen confirmed that Mr Cheng had been detained for violating public security management regulations, and was released after that period on Saturday.  Police also said he had “confessed to the facts of his illegal activity,” without saying what those activities were. Mr Cheng was not formally charged or tried in court, and his family rejected allegations in Chinese state media that he had been detained for visiting prostitutes.  On Friday the UK issued a warning to all travellers to Hong Kong about increased scrutiny from mainland authorities at border crossings. The warning added that mobile phones and electronic devices were being checked by border patrol. Mr Cheng’s mysterious disappearance highlights China’s murky legal and judicial system – something that help kicked off mass protests early June in Hong Kong. Many fear freedoms enjoyed in Hong Kong, guaranteed for at least 50 years under an agreement that became effective when the former British colony was returned to Beijing, are fast-disappearing under China’s ruling Communist Party.  Hong Kong crisis | Comment and analysis Millions first took to the streets against a now-suspended extradition proposal that would have sent people to face trial in mainland China, where Communist Party control of the courts contributes to a 99.9 per cent conviction rate. Forced confessions are also common with suspects paraded on state television. “What happened to Simong Cheng – this is a common tactic used by the central government to put pressure on people,” said Kammy Yang, 50, an office clerk at a protest on Saturday. “Many Chinese activists were accused of prostitution or tax scams; this is their strategy in China, trying to suppress freedom.” Thousands of protesters on Saturday engaged in a series of skirmishes, throwing projectiles from bricks to petrol bombs at police who responded with sprays of tear gas and rubber bullets. It was the first time tear gas had been deployed in 10 days, a period of relative calm as protesters recalibrated their approach in an otherwise tumultuous, violent summer.  Demonstrators join hands to form a human chain during the Hong Kong Way event in the Central district of Hong Kong, China, on Friday Credit: Bloomberg “The reasons why protesters are building roadblocks, surrounding police stations, and throwing bricks – it’s because the government doesn’t respond to us,” said Vaso Chan, 28, an office clerk. “It’s not fun for any of us to come out during summer break.” Protesters spray painted slogans like “Give me liberty or death,” Chinazi,” and “HK popo Gestapo,” on sidewalks and highways. As the political movement has grown, so have protesters’ demands, who are now calling for an independent inquiry into police handling of the protests, the resignation of Hong Kong chief executive Carrie Lam, and direct leadership elections.  City leaders however have made no concessions, instead thrusting the police to the front lines to handle the situation, further angering protesters.  Demonstrations are occurring nearly every day now in the financial hub, disrupting traffic and public transportation. On Saturday, several stations closed along a planned march route. But despite growing unrest, public support for the protesters has stayed strong, with marches and strikes planned through September. “No matter whether those protesters are peaceful protesters or protesters that are standing in the ‘front lines’, no matter what they do, we will support them,” said Mr Chan.


VIDEO: 2 trans women, gay man ejected from DTLA bar after alleged altercation with other group

VIDEO: 2 trans women, gay man ejected from DTLA bar after alleged altercation with other groupTwo transgender women who were forcibly removed from a downtown L.A. bar say security guards used excessive force after they were allegedly verbally attacked with transphobic slurs.


20 of the Craziest Pickup Trucks Ever

20 of the Craziest Pickup Trucks Ever


Trump claim doctors treating mass shooting victims 'were coming out of operating rooms' to meet him dismissed by hospitals

Trump claim doctors treating mass shooting victims 'were coming out of operating rooms' to meet him dismissed by hospitalsTwo hospitals have denied Donald Trump’s claim doctors “were coming out of operating rooms” to meet him when he travelled to Texas and Ohio to console victims of two mass shootings."At no time did, or would, physicians or staff leave active operating rooms during the presidential visit,” University Medical Center (UMC) spokesperson Ryan Mielke told local TV station KVIA. “Our priority is always patient care."


Journalist killed in Mexico

Journalist killed in MexicoThe head of a Mexican news website was found stabbed to death in the center of the country, authorities said Saturday, the 10th such killing this year. The body of Nevith Condes Jaramillo "was found Saturday morning... showing injuries from a sharp object," the state prosecutor said in a statement. Condes Jaramillo, 42, was the head of a local news site in Tejupilco and was also an announcer on a community radio station.


Russia's Chechnya inaugurates what it says is Europe's largest mosque

Russia's Chechnya inaugurates what it says is Europe's largest mosqueAuthorities in the Russian region of Chechnya on Friday inaugurated what they said was the largest mosque in Europe in a pomp-filled ceremony attended by local and foreign officials. Named after the Prophet Mohammed, the marble-decorated mosque has capacity for more than 30,000 people and has been described by the Chechen authorities as the "largest and most beautiful" mosque in Europe. Chechen leader Ramzan Kadyrov, an ally of President Vladimir Putin, said the mosque -- located in Shali, a town of 54,000 just outside the regional capital Grozny -- was "unique in its design, and majestic in its size and beauty".


The Latest: Harris gets warm welcome at California meeting

The Latest: Harris gets warm welcome at California meetingCalifornia Sen. Kamala Harris is getting a rousing hometown welcome at the Democratic National Committee summer meeting in San Francisco. Harris is looking to California as a potentially key part of her path to the Democratic presidential nomination. With scores of supporters in the gallery Friday, Harris harkened back to her first political race for district attorney.


A man was training to get a gun permit. The instructor accidentally shot him, police say

A man was training to get a gun permit. The instructor accidentally shot him, police sayThe instructor, a Riverside County Sheriff's Department trainer, accidentally shot a student attending the class to get a concealed weapons permit.


A man with schizophrenia was found guilty of murdering a Saint Augustine's University student in 1979. 40 years later, a panel of judges decided he's innocent after all.

A man with schizophrenia was found guilty of murdering a Saint Augustine's University student in 1979. 40 years later, a panel of judges decided he's innocent after all.Blackmon's lawyers argued he was tricked by police and prosecutors into falsely confessing to a crime he didn't commit.


A floating nuclear plant in Russia features a gym, bar, and pool. An expert calls it 'Chernobyl on ice.'

A floating nuclear plant in Russia features a gym, bar, and pool. An expert calls it 'Chernobyl on ice.'Environmental activists worry about the perils of placing nuclear reactors at sea, where they could be vulnerable to climate-related disasters.


Metal detectorist finds £10,000 gold ring in garage 40 years after discarding it as worthless

Metal detectorist finds £10,000 gold ring in garage 40 years after discarding it as worthlessA metal detectorist who discarded a gold ring in his garage for 40 years after a museum told him it was worthless has discovered its real value is £10,000. Tom Clark, 81, dug up the buried treasure while scanning an area of farmland near Aylesbury, Buckinghamshire, in 1979, then put it inside a metal tin and forgot about it. But the retired leather craftsman came across the rare seal ring eight years ago while sorting through items from his mother's house after she passed away. He got the item valued and was astonished to discover that it was actually a 670-year-old medieval artefact dating back to 1350. It is due to be auctioned off in Derbyshire on Tuesday (Aug 27) and is expected to sell for between £8,500 and £10,000. The turn of events is similar to the plot of BBC sitcom Only Fools and Horses, when brothers Del and Rodney come across a watch in their garage which is then auctioned off for millions of pounds. Mr Clark said: "I had completely forgotten about it. At the time I'd only been metal detecting for 10 years and didn't realise the ring was anything special. It was all twisted and broken when I dug it up." He took the rare ring along with some others to a museum to have them valued at the time, but was told they were all fairly modern. "I put them all in a tin and left them in the garage at my mother's house," he said. "A few months ago, I was sorting through some stuff in my own garage that had come from my mother's house and there it was - the tin with the rings in it." Tom is auctioning off the ring, which is expected to make between £8,500 and £10,000 Credit: Hansons / SWNS/Hansons / SWNS Mr Clark, now a much more experienced collector, said he instantly knew it was a seal ring dating back to the 1300s and would have belonged to someone important given its decoration and quality. He added: "It's rare and elegant. I'd love to know who it belonged to." A Latin inscription on the ring translates as 'I hide the true message'. Mark Becher, Historica expert at auctioneer Hansons, said: "It's a fascinating piece of medieval jewellery and I'm delighted Tom rediscovered again after all these years."


Police Arrest 29 as Protesters Cause Damage: Hong Kong Update

Police Arrest 29 as Protesters Cause Damage: Hong Kong Update(Bloomberg) -- Hong Kong police fired tear gas and arrested 29 people on Saturday after protesters occupied roads, set up barricades and hurled projectiles in the 12th week of unrest in the Asian financial center.At least two more rallies were taking place on Sunday, including one organized by relatives of police officers, who have been criticized for using excessive force to quell protests. Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam held a meeting on Saturday with former officials and other prominent people to find a way out of the impasse that has rocked the former British colony.Demonstrators are looking to maintain momentum after large but peaceful protests last weekend temporarily broke a pattern of tear gas and police clashes. They formed a human chain across the city on Friday, while a plan to disrupt airport transportation services on Saturday wasn’t successful. Historic mass marches opposing legislation easing extraditions to China began peacefully in June, and have since widened into a broader movement against Beijing’s increasing grip.Key Developments:Police arrested more than two dozen protesters on SaturdayChief Executive Lam seeks to build a dialogue platform to address roots of discontentU.K. consulate staffer Simon Cheng was released by China on Saturday after more than two weeks of detentionHere’s the latest:Rain march (Sunday 2 p.m.)People took cover from the persistent rain and filled the stands and pitch of the Kwai Chung sports stadium, the starting point for Sunday’s rally. The march from the stadium was granted late-night approval after organizers appealed an earlier objection by authorities.“The rainy weather is good for the protesters but it’s bad for the police, who are wearing heavy gear. It also makes their tear gas ineffective,” said Gloria Mak, a 25-year-old assistant to a Japanese company.Train service suspended (Sunday 11.30 a.m.)MTR Corp., operator of Hong Kong’s rail network, suspended train service to stations near the planned Tsuen Wan march. The company said in a statement that the Kwai Fong, Tsuen Wan and Tai Wo Hau stations would be closed from 1.30 p.m. until further notice.On Saturday, MTR suspended service on parts of its Kwun Tong line because of protests in the area.Operations Director Adi Lau Tin-shing said the current situation was the company’s biggest challenge in its 40 years of operation and that the station closures were an unavoidable decision taken on the grounds of safety.Police condemn ‘radical’ behavior (Sunday, 3:02 a.m.)Police said “radical protesters” in Saturday’s clashes used electric saws to damage a number of smart lampposts, and hurled hard objects, bricks and petrol bombs at officers. They arrested 19 men and 10 women, aged between 17 and 52, for offenses including the possession of offensive weapons and assaulting police officers, the police said in a statement.Bricks and bamboo poles (Saturday 4:20 p.m.)Police fired tear gas to break up demonstrators blocking a road in the Kwung Tong area. Protesters were seen breaking bricks into smaller pieces and using bamboo poles to keep police from getting close to a barricade they erected. Elsewhere, video footage showed a so-called smart lamppost that was toppled and notes declaring “no totalitarian surveillance” were pasted on it.Protesters split up from the authorized march route and some regathered in the neighborhood of Wong Tai Sin, the scene of clashes earlier this month. Police fired tear gas and made arrests after the demonstrators blocked off roads and disrupted traffic.Lam seeks dialogue platform (Saturday 3:10 p.m.)About 30 people were invited to the meeting organized by Lam in Government House, including ex-transport chief Anthony Cheung and Cardinal John Tong, the former bishop of Hong Kong, RTHK reported. Lam said the meeting was not a “dialogue platform” but a gathering to share ideas on how to build dialogue.“I do not expect dialogue to easily resolve the deadlock, stop demonstrations, or to provide solutions to problems,” she said in a Facebook post. “But continuing to fight is not the way out.”Cathay issues warning (3.30 p.m.)Cathay Pacific Airways Ltd. said it will not tolerate employees supporting or taking part in illegal protests ahead of “planned activities” by the Hong Kong Confederation of Trade Unions on Aug. 26.The Airport Authority Hong Kong obtained a High Court order to extend an interim injunction granted on Aug. 13 banning protesters from unlawfully obstructing access to the airport. That injunction covers Cathay City, “which is the operational hub for our global operations and as such includes facilities that are absolutely critical to our flight operations,” Cathay said in Saturday’s statement.Operations at the city’s airport were disrupted earlier this month when protesters occupied the building.U.K. Consulate Staffer Freed (10:39 a.m.)Chinese police released a U.K. consulate staffer from Hong Kong after more than two weeks in detention. Simon Cheng was set free on Saturday after he was held for violating the Public Security Administration Punishment Law, police in the southern Chinese city of Shenzhen said in a post on the Weibo social media platform. He failed to return home to Hong Kong from an Aug. 8 meeting in Shenzhen.Upcoming ScheduleThe weekend concludes with Sunday protests in the Tsuen Wan and Kwai Chung areas, starting mid-afternoon. Relatives of police also plan a march to the official residence of Chief Executive Lam in support of local law enforcement.\--With assistance from Justin Chin, Sheryl Tian Tong Lee and Venus Feng.To contact the reporters on this story: Kari Lindberg in Hong Kong at klindberg13@bloomberg.net;Annie Lee in Hong Kong at olee42@bloomberg.net;Aaron Mc Nicholas in Hong Kong at amcnicholas2@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Shamim Adam at sadam2@bloomberg.net, ;Brendan Scott at bscott66@bloomberg.net, Stanley James, Andrew JanesFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


Revered as a saint by online extremists, how Christchurch shooter inspired copycat terrorists around the world

Revered as a saint by online extremists, how Christchurch shooter inspired copycat terrorists around the world“Brenton Tarrant was a catalyst for me personally. He showed me that it could be done. And that it needed to be done.”Those were the words written by John Timothy Earnest shortly before he stormed a synagogue in Poway, California, and opened fire on the Jewish congregation.


South Korea begins annual war games to defend against Japan

South Korea begins annual war games to defend against JapanSouth Korea Sunday began two days of war games to practise defending disputed islands off its east coast against an unlikely attack from Japan, further stoking tensions between the Asian neighbours. The annual drills come just days after Seoul terminated a military intelligence-sharing pact with Tokyo, with the countries at loggerheads over Japan's use of forced labour during World War II. The two-day exercise will involve warships and aircraft, the South Korean navy said in a text message without providing more detail.


Trump's economic anxiety comes to a boil

Trump's economic anxiety comes to a boilThe president directs U.S. businesses to pull out of China, but maintains that the "economy is doing really well."


Chinese embassy says the US is trying to suppress Huawei

Chinese embassy says the US is trying to suppress HuaweiAn embassy statement to The Associated Press said the arrest of Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou in Canada at the request of U.S. authorities is "of course different" from China's detentions of Canadians Michael Kovrig and Michael Spavor. "The Meng Wanzhou incident is not just a judicial case, but the U.S. using state power to work with its certain ally to suppress a private high-tech Chinese enterprise on unwarranted charges.


Fast-moving wildfire erupts in California, forcing thousands to evacuate

Fast-moving wildfire erupts in California, forcing thousands to evacuateMountain fire races across hundreds of acres in just hours as wildfire season looms large over the stateThis photo provided by Cal Fire shows an aerial view of the Mountain Fire on 22 August. Photograph: APA fast-moving wildfire that broke out on Thursday in northern California has forced the evacuation of nearly 4,000 residents, racing across at least 600 acres within just a few hours, officials say. The Mountain fire, which erupted on the outskirts of a national forest in northern California, has threatened 1,110 homes and structures. As of Friday morning the fire was 40% contained , according to Cal Fire.The cause of the fire is under investigation.Photos of the blaze posted on Twitter by the Shasta county sheriff’s office showed thick black and gray smoke billowing into the area over a highway near the Shasta-Trinity national forest.“Jones Valley and Bella Vista area residents! This situation is very fluid and rapidly changing, if you do not see your road listed but feel you are in danger YOU MAY EVACUATE to Shasta College Gymnasium,” the sheriff’s department said in a separate tweet.The Mountain fire is threatening thousands of homes and forcing evacuations. Photograph: APThe Shasta College campus was closed along with Highway 299 and about a dozen smaller roads. Residents of small communities in the path of the flames were told to evacuate or be prepared to flee on short notice.California was hit by some of the deadliest and most destructive wildfires in a century last year and state officials have warned this year’s fire season could be similarly intense.The Camp fire, which broke out in Butte county in November and overran the town of Paradise, killed 86 people and left thousands of others homeless. State fire investigators determined that the Camp fire was sparked by Pacific Gas & Electric Co transmission lines.The Mountain fire broke out on the same day that Bernie Sanders, the senator and Democratic presidential candidate, unveiled his $16.3tn climate change plan and toured Paradise, which he called a “wake-up call for our entire nation”.“Climate change is a major, major crisis for our country, and the entire world, and one of the manifestations of that crisis is what happened here,” Sanders said as he walked through a burned-out mobile home park in Paradise alongside people who lost their homes in last November’s deadly blaze.


Former police officer charged with murder for botched Houston raid

Former police officer charged with murder for botched Houston raidProsecutors are reviewing 14,000 criminal cases involving the drug squad that conducted the raid for evidence of improprieties, Harris County District Attorney Kim Ogg told a news conference. In January, then police officer Gerald Goines wrote in an affidavit to obtain a search warrant that an informant had bought heroin at the house, Ogg said. On Jan. 28, Goines and his Houston narcotics squad entered the house without knocking, as allowed under the warrant.


An innocent man spent months in jail after customs officials thought honey he brought back from Jamaica was liquid meth

An innocent man spent months in jail after customs officials thought honey he brought back from Jamaica was liquid methLeon Haughton told The Washington Post he was jailed for 82 days after customs officials in Baltimore alleged that the three jars of honey were meth.


Democratic presidential candidates have a new approach for tackling gun violence: Treat it as a public-health crisis

Democratic presidential candidates have a new approach for tackling gun violence: Treat it as a public-health crisisCandidates like Elizabeth Warren and Cory Booker want to draw on tactics used by community-based organizations to fight gun violence.


Cathay Pacific cabin crew union leader fired as Hong Kongers warn of spread of 'white terror'

Cathay Pacific cabin crew union leader fired as Hong Kongers warn of spread of 'white terror'Cathay Pacific fired a cabin crew union leader on Friday, the latest casualty in a fast-spreading “white terror” as mass protests in Hong Kong continue into their third month.  Rebecca Sy, head of the Cathay Dragon flight attendant’s association, said she lost her job of 17 years, without explanation,  after managers saw and confirmed her Facebook account,  which included messages in favour of the protests. “All the employees are being frightened, not just cabin crews, but even the management,” Ms Sy told reporters. “My colleagues are all terrified because of its white terror.” “White terror” is a term used to describe a slew of events that create a climate of fear particularly as companies and employees worry of serious repercussions for voicing their views. Her departure follows a surprise resignation last week by CEO Rupert Hogg, reported first by Chinese state media, underlining the political nature of the decision. Cathay has borne the brunt of Beijing’s anger as authorities look to punish companies with any link to the Hong Kong protests - a direct challenge to the power of the Communist Party. Rebecca Sy was dismissed from her position as flight attendant for Cathay Pacific's subsidiary Cathay Dragon Credit: ANTHONY WALLACE/AFP/Getty Images In the crackdown, companies and employees could face serious repercussions for voicing their views. Hong Kong subway operator MTR has also come under fire for arranging additional trains to allow protesters to travel home, accused of “colluding with rioters” in Chinese state media.  Beijing authorities have long put the squeeze on companies over political issues by encouraging its 1.4 billion citizens to snub various brands or by throwing up a number of regulatory roadblocks – a move that can have devastating consequences for even the biggest firms. Simon Cheng, 28, a British consular official in Hong Kong and permanent resident of the city has been detained for two weeks in mainland China for allegedly visiting prostitutes.  Under Chinese law, Mr Cheng should have been released today after a 15-day administrative period but at time of publication he was still in detention. Hong Kong police said on Friday that they did not know Mr Cheng's whereabouts.  Protests in Hong Kong first kicked off over an extradition proposal that would have exposed people to China’s murky legal and judicial system, where authorities have also in the past detained foreigners to express political displeasure. Two Canadians - Michael Kovrig, a former diplomat, and Michael Spavor, an entrepreneur - were detained in China last year during Beijing’s diplomatic dispute with Ottawa over its arrest of Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou. It is widely viewed that both men - who are still being held and have been charged with spying – are being used as political pawns. Hong Kong protests | Read more A number of multinationals operating in Hong Kong have sought to stress their political neutrality to avoid their businesses being targeted and to protect staff from arbitrary detention.  Earlier this week, the world’s “big four” accounting firms came under attack after an anonymous group claiming to be made up of their employees took out a full-page newspaper advertisement to express support for protests in Hong Kong and condemn the firms for remaining silent on the issue. Deloitte, Ernst & Young, KPMG and Pricewaterhouse Coopers all sought to distance themselves from the advertisement, saying it didn’t represent the companies’ views. But Chinese state media had already seized on the situation, calling for the firms to identify and sack the employees behind the ad. FinnAir has also issued a warning to staff to remember to “keep work and politics separate,” reported the South China Morning Post, over concerns that any link to the protests might lead to a customer backlash or flight cancellations in China, its second-largest market for long-haul travel.   “China is obviously putting pressure on companies to ensure that they all hold the same political views,” said Keenan Chuk, 30, a finance manager who attended a lunchtime rally or accountants in Hong Kong’s central business district Friday.  “I am concerned that I will be fired,” he said, adding that “we still have to fight for our rights.” Even universities have warned students against discussing politics and participating in rallies.  “In a modern society, education should be free from politics so as to alleviate the escalation of anxiety and avoid the divisive society caused by chaos,” according to a statement from the City University of Hong Kong issued earlier this month. A woman said she experienced at a police station during her detention in Hong Kong Credit: REUTERS/Thomas Peter Some banks are also now taking precautionary measures, purchasing full page ads in newspapers to affirm their support for the government. Edwin, 26, an accountant who declined to give his last name, said senior partners in his firm had invited junior employees to lunch that day in an attempt to dissuade people from attending Friday’s protest.  But he participated in the demonstration anyway, turning up again in the evening to join a human chain meant to evoke the Baltic Way, when two million lined up across three countries to protest Soviet rule in 1989.  “In the industry, we switch firms quite often,” he shrugged. Hong Kong police came under renewed pressure on Friday when officers were accused of conducting an unnecessary strip search on a female protester. The alleged victim appeared at a press conference dressed in all black with a black face mask, cap and sunglasses. Facing the cameras in front of a "MeToo" sign, she claimed she was arrested weeks ago at a protest against the now-abandoned extradition bill and was admitted to hospital for injuries she suffered that night. By her account, one officer patted her thighs with a pen, instructing her to open her legs wider after ordering her to take off all her clothes in a police cell. The police said their body search procedures had not changed during the recent outbreak of citywide protests.


Iceland Held Talks With U.S. Ambassador Over Pence Visit

Iceland Held Talks With U.S. Ambassador Over Pence Visit(Bloomberg) -- Iceland’ prime minister is open to a meeting with Vice President Mike Pence during his trip to the Nordic island, should the visit be extended.The option was discussed during a pre-scheduled meeting on Friday between Katrin Jakobsdottir and ambassador Jeffrey Gunter, a government spokesman told Bloomberg.Jakobsdottir, a left-of-center feminist and LGBT advocate, is due to attend a conference by Nordic trade union leaders in Sweden on Sept. 4. That’s the same day in which Pence is due to arrive.Jakobsdottir’s decision to not change her schedule to accommodate the vice president’s visit has been criticized at home.Olaf­ur Hardar­son, a professor of political science at the University of Iceland, told local media Morgunbladid it would be “unusual” for the prime minister not to greet the American vice president.According to her spokeswoman, a final decision on whether the meeting can take place has not yet been made.The White House said Pence planned to discuss trade opportunities, the Arctic and NATO efforts to counter Russian aggression in the region.The scheduling snafu is the latest episode in a series of exchanges involving Donald Trump and the Nordics.Pence’s visit would take place in the wake of a very public spat between the U.S. president and Denmark over its refusal to sell Greenland.Trump said Saturday he had held a “nice” conversation with Mette Frederiksen, with the exchange coming just days after labeling the Danish prime minister as “nasty.”In 2017, Sweden reacted forcibly to Trump’s portrayal of the Nordic nation as being in a state of chaos and overrun by crime after an influx of refugees.(Adds quote in fifth paragraph.)To contact the reporter on this story: Ragnhildur Sigurdardottir in Reykjavik at rsigurdardot@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Jonas Bergman at jbergman@bloomberg.net, Nick Rigillo, Andrew DavisFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


Fear grips Bangladesh camp as 2 Rohingya refugees killed

Fear grips Bangladesh camp as 2 Rohingya refugees killedBangladesh police said they had shot dead two Rohingya refugees during a gunfight in a refugee camp on Saturday after the pair were accused of killing a ruling party official. Nearly a million Rohingya live in squalid camps in southeast Bangladesh, 740,000 of whom fled a 2017 military offensive against the Muslim minority in Myanmar. The incident comes two days after a second failed attempt to repatriate the refugees, which saw not a single Rohingya turn up to return across the border to conflict-scarred Rakhine state.


Dow, stocks dive off Trump's latest comments on US-China trade war

Dow, stocks dive off Trump's latest comments on US-China trade warStocks fell sharply on Wall Street Friday after President Donald Trump called on U.S. companies to consider alternatives to doing business in China


All the Best Le Creuset Deals During Williams Sonoma Warehouse Sale

All the Best Le Creuset Deals During Williams Sonoma Warehouse Sale


Russian doctor has trace of radiation after explosion

Russian doctor has trace of radiation after explosionMore than 100 Russian medical workers who helped treat victims of a recent mysterious explosion at a military testing range have undergone checks and one man has been found with a trace of radiation, officials said Friday. It was followed by a brief rise in radiation levels in nearby Severodvinsk, but the authorities insisted it didn't pose any danger. The Arkhangelsk regional administration said Friday that 110 medical workers have undergone checks that one man was found with a low amount of radioactive cesium-137 in his muscle tissue.


Serial killer linked to dozens of U.S. murders pleads guilty to two more

Serial killer linked to dozens of U.S. murders pleads guilty to two moreThe date of the Jane Doe killing is unknown but is believed to have occurred sometime between 1980 and 1999. The 79-year-old defendant appeared in Cincinnati's Hamilton County Court via Skype from California State Prison in Los Angeles County and sat with his hands folded in a wheelchair, responding "Yes, ma'am" when Judge Melba Marsh asked if he waived his right to a trial by jury. "He said he specifically looked for people who would not be missed," Chief Assistant Prosecutor Mark Piepmeier told the judge.


Watch Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez play with a penguin because it's pure, uncut goodness

Watch Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez play with a penguin because it's pure, uncut goodnessThe world can be a cruel, unforgiving place. But, somehow, watching Congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez play and dance with a penguin makes everything just a little bit better. Even if only for a moment. On Saturday, Ocasio-Cortez tweeted a video of herself and her flipper-sporting friend engaged in a round of what looks to be playful dance. Seriously, it's adorable. The penguin is all the way in."A new day, a new friend," Ocasio-Cortez wrote of her encounter. Importantly, Ocasio-Cortez is not roaming around Antarctica. Rather, she appears to be in a science museum or zoo. The display next to the penguin enclosure includes facts about African Penguins -- which have a home in the Maryland Zoo, among other places.SEE ALSO: Australian strangers engage in weird, elaborate feud over their coffeeshop fandom"The Maryland Zoo maintains the largest colony of African penguins in North America," the Zoo helpfully notes on its website for all you penguin heads out there.Regardless of the specific location, we're totally in. Now excuse us while we play this video on repeat to drown out the world's sorrows.  WATCH: A prehistoric human-sized penguin has been discovered in New Zealand


A youth sports organization is raffling off a semi-automatic weapon to help its cheerleading and football teams

A youth sports organization is raffling off a semi-automatic weapon to help its cheerleading and football teamsAs a result of the controversy, the president of the organization said he is considering doing away with the rifle raffle for future fundraisers.


Cathay flight attendant says fired over Facebook posts on HK protests

Cathay flight attendant says fired over Facebook posts on HK protestsA flight attendant on Friday accused Cathay Pacific of summarily firing her over Facebook posts linked to Hong Kong's political crisis, adding to concerns about a China-driven witch-hunt to root out pro-democracy supporters at major firms. The Hong Kong-based airline has been accused of bowing to political and commercial pressure from Beijing by sacking employees in recent weeks for their public support for the massive anti-government movement roiling Hong Kong. Earlier this month, China's aviation authority ordered Cathay Pacific to stop pro-democracy supporters among its 27,000 staff from working on flights to -- or over -- China, after a general strike drew out some of its workers.


Man Throws Brick at Woman's Head in One of Several Random NYC Attacks

Man Throws Brick at Woman's Head in One of Several Random NYC AttacksA man has attacked at least four people in random Manhattan attacks this August, police said.


Qantas to test 'ultra long-haul' Sydney to NY, London flights

Qantas to test 'ultra long-haul' Sydney to NY, London flightsQantas on Thursday said it will run "ultra long-haul" test flights in the coming months from New York and London to Sydney in order to assess the health of pilots and passengers, as it eyes commercial services on the marathon routes. Qantas last year introduced the first direct service from the western Australian city of Perth to London, with the 17-hour journey one of the longest passenger flights in the world. "Flying non-stop from the East Coast of Australia to London and New York is truly the final frontier in aviation, so we're determined to do all the groundwork to get this right," Qantas CEO Alan Joyce said in a statement.


Pompeo says Huawei CEO is not a bargaining chip in Trump-China trade war

Pompeo says Huawei CEO is not a bargaining chip in Trump-China trade warMike Pompeo has rejected claims that detained Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou is being used for leverage in the US-China trade war. Speaking with his Canadian counterpart, Chrystia Freeland, in Ottawa on Thursday, the US secretary of state appeared to rule out dropping the extradition request for Ms Meng to ease tensions with Beijing, insisting it is a legal matter. In December, US president Donald Trump implied he might intervene in the case to help secure a trade deal with China. “Whatever’s good for this country, I would do,” he said at the time. The US alleges Ms Meng – the Chinese technology company’s chief financial officer and the daughter of its chief executive – helped  Huawei circumvent sanctions on Iran. According to Vancouver court documents released this week, she told a Canadian border official that the company has an office in Iran. The US has charged Ms Meng, 47, with bank fraud, wire fraud and conspiracy to commit both. She is currently on bail living under house arrest in one of her Vancouver mansions while her lawyers fight her extradition to the US. Asked on Thursday if she is a “bargaining chip” in US-China trade talks, Mr Pompeo replied simply: “No.” Since Ms Meng’s arrest in Vancouver airport on a US arrest warrant in December, ties between Ottawa and Beijing have fallen to a historically low ebb. Two Canadians, businessman Michael Svapor and former diplomat Michael Kovrig, were arrested and charged with espionage shortly afterwards in what is widely viewed as a reprisal by Beijing. “Our team is focussed on helping those two Canadians be released,” Mr Pompeo said later ahead of a meeting with Canadian prime minister Justin Trudeau. Mr Trump spoke directly to Chinese president Xi Jinping about their “arbitrary detention” in June, he told journalists. Mr Pompeo, 55, also slapped down a question comparing their confinement with that of Ms Meng, accusing the journalist of taking “the Chinese line”. Mr Pompeo was visiting Canada ahead of the G7 meeting in France, where relations with China will be discussed. On Friday, Beijing escalated the trade dispute, announcing fresh tariffs on US imports worth $75 billion (£61 billion).


Chinese buyers pull back from U.S. housing market, hurting home sales

Chinese buyers pull back from U.S. housing market, hurting home salesChinese investors are buying fewer U.S. homes because of money controls in China. That's lowering prices and giving U.S. buyers a better chance to buy


Rep. Steve King wants to make abortion point in 'softer way'

Rep. Steve King wants to make abortion point in 'softer way'Backed by supporters at a news conference in Des Moines, the Iowa Republican affirmed his belief that abortion should be outlawed with no exceptions for rape or incest. King faced criticism for his comment Aug. 14 that questioned whether there would be "any population of the world left" if not for births due to rape or incest. The remarks were condemned by numerous groups and individuals, including Republican and Democratic candidates seeking to oust King, Democratic presidential candidates as well as the Iowa Republican Party and Rep. Liz Cheney, the No. 3 Republican in House leadership.


Sitting Pretty

Sitting Pretty


Released from death row, then returned — forced to prove race discrimination a second time

Released from death row, then returned — forced to prove race discrimination a second timeCases before N.C. Supreme Court show link between slavery, Jim Crow and modern death penalty is as connected as 'ropes of the lynch-man's noose'


Israel hits Iranian force in Syria to stop 'killer drones': military

Israel hits Iranian force in Syria to stop 'killer drones': militaryJERUSALEM/DAMASCUS (Reuters) - Israeli aircraft on Saturday struck Iranian forces near Damascus that had been planning to launch "killer drones" at targets in Israel, an Israeli military spokesman said. "The strike targeted Iranian Quds Force operatives and Shiite militias which were preparing to advance attack plans targeting sites in Israel from within Syria over the last number of days," the military said in a statement. The elite Quds Force is the overseas arm of Iran's Revolutionary Guards (IRGC).


Britain sends another warship to Gulf

Britain sends another warship to GulfA third British warship is heading to the Gulf, the Royal Navy announced Saturday, amid heightened tensions in the region. Britain has already sent the HMS Kent to cover for frigate HMS Montrose while it undergoes maintenance in nearby Bahrain, and is now redirecting the Type 45 destroyer HMS Defender from its mission to the Pacific. Britain outraged Iran by seizing one of its tankers -- the Grace 1 -- on July 4 on suspicion it was carrying oil to Syria in violation of EU sanctions.


Kavanaugh’s High-School Classmate Sues HuffPost for Defamation

Kavanaugh’s High-School Classmate Sues HuffPost for DefamationA former high-school classmate of Supreme Court justice Brett Kavanaugh has filed suit against HuffPost over a “fabricated” report intended to detail the culture of debauchery at Georgetown Preparatory School during Kavanaugh's time there.HuffPost reporter Ashley Feinberg, now at Slate, published a report at the height of the Kavanaugh confirmation controversy entitled “Former Student: Brett Kavanaugh's Prep School Party Scene Was a ‘Free-For-All',” which purported to expose the degenerate culture that predominated at Georgetown Prep when Kavanaugh was a student. That hard-partying ethos supposedly culminated in the 1984 overdose death of David Kennedy, Robert F. Kennedy's son, in a Palm Beach hotel.Feinberg, citing one anonymous Georgetown Prep alumnus, wrote that “two students — David's brother Doug, and his friend Derrick Evans — had helped score the coke” that ultimately killed David. Evans, an African American professor and community activist, filed suit on Wednesday alleging that Feinberg failed to contact him and fabricated his role in David's death in her “zeal to create a sensational article about Judge Brett Kavanaugh’s years at [Georgetown Prep] and thereby drive traffic to [HuffPost's] website.”“Indeed, if Ms. Feinberg or her HuffPost editors had done even the most basic research of publicly available sources, she and they would have known, if they did not already know, that Mr. Evans actively assisted law enforcement in identifying and prosecuting the individuals who actually sold the illegal narcotics,” the lawsuit reads.HuffPost initially corrected the article after Doug Kennedy's employer, Fox News, sent a letter to the outlet rebutting its allegations.“This article previously stated incorrectly that Doug Kennedy was involved in helping his brother to purchase drugs in 1984. Kennedy was only sharing a room with Derrick Evans, who helped David purchase the drugs, according to an affidavit obtained by the New York Times. We regret the error,” reads a correction appended to the article just one day after it was published.While the correction exonerated Doug Kennedy it also further defamed Evans, according to the lawsuit.“The September 21 correction was another complete fabrication published by HuffPost with actual knowledge that both it and the original publication were false or in reckless disregard of the truth, again without ever attempting to contact Mr. Evans for comment,” the lawsuit reads. “As HuffPost knew, there was NO affidavit reflecting that Mr. Evans ever helped anyone purchase illegal drugs. Defendants had no such affidavit in their possession, and they could not have had such an affidavit in their possession.”The original article has been significantly altered since its publication and, as of this writing, no longer contains any reference to David's death.The case, Evans v. Huffington Post.com Inc., is now pending in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Mississippi.


Ghost Particles Could Explain Just About Everything in the Universe

Ghost Particles Could Explain Just About Everything in the UniverseYou might also know them by their other name: neutrinos.


U.S. ‘Starting to Lose China,’ Says Global Times’ Hu Xijin

U.S. ‘Starting to Lose China,’ Says Global Times’ Hu Xijin(Bloomberg) -- Terms of Trade is a daily newsletter that untangles a world embroiled in trade wars. Sign up here. China will follow through with retaliatory measures announced Friday and fight the trade war to the end, in the face of the U.S.’s failure to keep its promises, the state-run People’s Daily wrote in a Saturday editorial.Later, the influential Chinese journalist Hu Xijin said on Twitter that the U.S. is “starting to lose China.”On Friday, Beijing unveiled plans to impose additional tariffs on $75 billion of U.S. goods, including soybeans, automobiles and oil. The nation will “walk the talk” in implementing its third round of retaliatory measures, according to the newspaper.China has been forced into countermeasures by U.S. unilateralism and trade protectionism, the paper said, adding that Washington has been erratic in imposing tariffs on China and has shown “amnesia” in honoring its promises.Trade tensions between the two nations escalated on Friday after President Donald Trump said he’s raising tariffs on Chinese imports in response to the measures announced by Beijing. Anticipation of Trump’s actions, which were foreshadowed by a series of angry tweets, sent global stock markets reeling.Tariffs RisingExisting U.S. duties on $250 billion of Chinese imports will rise to 30% from 25% on Oct. 1, while a planned 10% tariff on a further $300 billion in Chinese goods will jump to 15%, starting with the first tranche on Sept. 1, Trump said in tweets Friday.China’s Ministry of Commerce issued a strongly-worded statement on Saturday saying the U.S. was involved in “unilateral and bullying trade protectionism” that puts the normal international trade order at risk.Trump, for his part, suggested in an overnight tweet that he was looking at the “Emergency Economic Powers Act of 1977” in ordering U.S. companies to quit China. “Case close!” Trump concluded.That measure -- technically, the International Emergency Economic Powers Act -- gives U.S. presidents wide latitude to regulate international commerce at times of national emergencies. It’s unclear how Trump could use the law in the current situation to have U.S. companies bend to his will.Hu, editor-in-chief of the Global Times, a tabloid newspaper controlled by China’s ruling Communist Party, accurately predicted the timing of China’s retaliatory tariffs on Friday.On Saturday, he said China “has ‘lost’ the U.S. already,” citing high tariffs, the ban on telecoms company Huawei Technologies Co. Ltd., political hostility, and actions toward Hong Kong and Taiwan. “We’re facing a completely different United States. We have nothing more to lose, while the US is just starting to lose China,” Xu said.While the Global Times doesn’t necessarily reflect the view of Chinese leaders, Hu has said the paper voices opinions that official sources can’t.Hu earlier tweeted that if U.S. automakers heed Trump’s Friday call for “major American companies” to desert China, they would be giving up the market to Japanese and German brands. “Go back to the US, let each American family have 20 cars,” he tweeted, followed by a smiley face.U.S. importers and retailers decried the latest moves by Trump.“These escalating tariffs are the worst economic mistake since the Smoot-Hawley Tariff Act of 1930 -- a decision that catapulted our country into the Great Depression,” Gary Shapiro, president and CEO of the Consumer Technology Association, said in a statement.(Updates with China’s Commerce Ministry, CTA comment from seventh paragraph.)To contact Bloomberg News staff for this story: Evelyn Yu in Shanghai at yyu263@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Sam Mamudi at smamudi@bloomberg.net, Ros Krasny, Steve GeimannFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


Man flees police on mobility scooter in low-speed chase as onlookers cheer 'Go old man!'

Man flees police on mobility scooter in low-speed chase as onlookers cheer 'Go old man!'The video shows Charlie Durham, a double amputee, speeding on his scooter as a police officer attempted to pull him over in New Zealand.


Lawsuit: Ex-Citadel staffer drugged, sexually abused cadet

Lawsuit: Ex-Citadel staffer drugged, sexually abused cadetA student at The Citadel sued an ex-instructor who he says agreed not to discipline him in exchange for sex. Former Citadel Lt. Col. Kenneth Boes was charged last year with sexually assaulting the cadet, but prosecutors dropped those charges for reasons that aren't explained in online court records. Boes' lawyer on Friday described the cadet as a false victim and violent young man who wants to make a quick buck at the expense of a man with an impeccable reputation.


Woman finds venomous spider in her ear after mistaking it for water

Woman finds venomous spider in her ear after mistaking it for waterThe discomfort in Susie Torres’ left ear felt like the water that can get stuck there after swimming. She heard swooshing when she woke up on Tuesday and assumed it had been caused by an allergy shot.Torres, of Kansas City, Missouri, discovered she was wrong when doctors extracted a dime-sized, venomous brown recluse spider, Fox 4 News reported.


Man Who Stopped to 'Assist' Woman Having Car Trouble Accused of Sexually Assaulting Her

Man Who Stopped to 'Assist' Woman Having Car Trouble Accused of Sexually Assaulting HerPolice in Monroe County, Indiana are working to identify a suspect in a rape case.


UPDATE 3-Saudi-led coalition says downs Houthi drone fired at airbase

UPDATE 3-Saudi-led coalition says downs Houthi drone fired at airbaseA Saudi-led military coalition fighting the Houthis in Yemen said it downed a drone on Sunday that the Iran-aligned group has said they launched in the direction of a Saudi airbase. "The coalition forces intercepted and downed a drone launched from the city of Sanaa in the direction of Khamis Muchait's residential neighbourhoods," coalition spokesman Colonel Turki al-Malki told the official Saudi Press Agency. A Houthi military spokesman cited by the group's Al-Masirah TV earlier said the group had launched drones targeting the control towers of the Abha airport and the Khamis Mushait airbase, both in the southwest of the kingdom.


N. Korea tests new 'super-large' multiple rocket launcher

N. Korea tests new 'super-large' multiple rocket launcherNorth Korea said Sunday leader Kim Jong Un supervised the test-firing of a "newly developed super-large multiple rocket launcher," another demonstration of its expanding weapons arsenal apparently aimed at increasing its leverage ahead of a possible resumption of nuclear talks with the U.S. Kim underscored the need to "continue to step up the development of Korean-style strategic and tactical weapons for resolutely frustrating the ever-mounting military threats and pressure offensive of the hostile forces," according to the KCNA. The "hostile forces" likely referred to the United States and South Korea, whose recently ended regular military drills infuriated North Korea.


Ex-wife, children of Atlanta surgeon Christopher Edwards found dead in apparent murder-suicide

Ex-wife, children of Atlanta surgeon Christopher Edwards found dead in apparent murder-suicideAuthorities say they believe Marsha Edwards shot Christopher Edwards Jr. and Erin Edwards before turning the gun on herself.


Police are trying to arrest their way out of a mass shooting epidemic, and experts warn that law enforcement can't shoulder the entire burden

Police are trying to arrest their way out of a mass shooting epidemic, and experts warn that law enforcement can't shoulder the entire burdenThe arrests won't fully or permanently stop a person determined to inflict mass death — and the US is nowhere near close to tackling the root causes.


UK Hong Kong consulate worker Simon Cheng freed after detention in mainland China

UK Hong Kong consulate worker Simon Cheng freed after detention in mainland ChinaA British consulate employee in Hong Kong has been freed by China after being detained for 15 days on the mainland amid rising tensions between the former British colony and Beijing. Simon Cheng, 28, a trade and investment officer at the Hong Kong consulate’s Scottish Development International section, went missing on August 8 on his way back from a work trip in Shenzhen, a neighbouring Chinese city.  It was not until after the UK expressed “extreme concern” about his disappearance that China’s foreign ministry broke its silence, confirming Mr Cheng had been detained without releasing further details.  On Saturday, his family announced that he had come back. "Simon has returned to Hong Kong; thanks you everyone for your support! Simon and his family wish to have some time to rest and recover, and will not take any interview,” they said in a statement.   An activist holds an illustration of Simon Cheng during a gathering outside the British Consulate-General building in Hong Kong  Credit: AFP Chinese police in Shenzhen confirmed that Mr Cheng had been detained for violating public security management regulations, and was released after that period on Saturday.  Police also said he had “confessed to the facts of his illegal activity,” without saying what those activities were. Mr Cheng was not formally charged or tried in court, and his family rejected allegations in Chinese state media that he had been detained for visiting prostitutes.  On Friday the UK issued a warning to all travellers to Hong Kong about increased scrutiny from mainland authorities at border crossings. The warning added that mobile phones and electronic devices were being checked by border patrol. Mr Cheng’s mysterious disappearance highlights China’s murky legal and judicial system – something that help kicked off mass protests early June in Hong Kong. Many fear freedoms enjoyed in Hong Kong, guaranteed for at least 50 years under an agreement that became effective when the former British colony was returned to Beijing, are fast-disappearing under China’s ruling Communist Party.  Hong Kong crisis | Comment and analysis Millions first took to the streets against a now-suspended extradition proposal that would have sent people to face trial in mainland China, where Communist Party control of the courts contributes to a 99.9 per cent conviction rate. Forced confessions are also common with suspects paraded on state television. “What happened to Simong Cheng – this is a common tactic used by the central government to put pressure on people,” said Kammy Yang, 50, an office clerk at a protest on Saturday. “Many Chinese activists were accused of prostitution or tax scams; this is their strategy in China, trying to suppress freedom.” Thousands of protesters on Saturday engaged in a series of skirmishes, throwing projectiles from bricks to petrol bombs at police who responded with sprays of tear gas and rubber bullets. It was the first time tear gas had been deployed in 10 days, a period of relative calm as protesters recalibrated their approach in an otherwise tumultuous, violent summer.  Demonstrators join hands to form a human chain during the Hong Kong Way event in the Central district of Hong Kong, China, on Friday Credit: Bloomberg “The reasons why protesters are building roadblocks, surrounding police stations, and throwing bricks – it’s because the government doesn’t respond to us,” said Vaso Chan, 28, an office clerk. “It’s not fun for any of us to come out during summer break.” Protesters spray painted slogans like “Give me liberty or death,” Chinazi,” and “HK popo Gestapo,” on sidewalks and highways. As the political movement has grown, so have protesters’ demands, who are now calling for an independent inquiry into police handling of the protests, the resignation of Hong Kong chief executive Carrie Lam, and direct leadership elections.  City leaders however have made no concessions, instead thrusting the police to the front lines to handle the situation, further angering protesters.  Demonstrations are occurring nearly every day now in the financial hub, disrupting traffic and public transportation. On Saturday, several stations closed along a planned march route. But despite growing unrest, public support for the protesters has stayed strong, with marches and strikes planned through September. “No matter whether those protesters are peaceful protesters or protesters that are standing in the ‘front lines’, no matter what they do, we will support them,” said Mr Chan.


VIDEO: 2 trans women, gay man ejected from DTLA bar after alleged altercation with other group

VIDEO: 2 trans women, gay man ejected from DTLA bar after alleged altercation with other groupTwo transgender women who were forcibly removed from a downtown L.A. bar say security guards used excessive force after they were allegedly verbally attacked with transphobic slurs.


20 of the Craziest Pickup Trucks Ever

20 of the Craziest Pickup Trucks Ever


Trump claim doctors treating mass shooting victims 'were coming out of operating rooms' to meet him dismissed by hospitals

Trump claim doctors treating mass shooting victims 'were coming out of operating rooms' to meet him dismissed by hospitalsTwo hospitals have denied Donald Trump’s claim doctors “were coming out of operating rooms” to meet him when he travelled to Texas and Ohio to console victims of two mass shootings."At no time did, or would, physicians or staff leave active operating rooms during the presidential visit,” University Medical Center (UMC) spokesperson Ryan Mielke told local TV station KVIA. “Our priority is always patient care."


Journalist killed in Mexico

Journalist killed in MexicoThe head of a Mexican news website was found stabbed to death in the center of the country, authorities said Saturday, the 10th such killing this year. The body of Nevith Condes Jaramillo "was found Saturday morning... showing injuries from a sharp object," the state prosecutor said in a statement. Condes Jaramillo, 42, was the head of a local news site in Tejupilco and was also an announcer on a community radio station.


Russia's Chechnya inaugurates what it says is Europe's largest mosque

Russia's Chechnya inaugurates what it says is Europe's largest mosqueAuthorities in the Russian region of Chechnya on Friday inaugurated what they said was the largest mosque in Europe in a pomp-filled ceremony attended by local and foreign officials. Named after the Prophet Mohammed, the marble-decorated mosque has capacity for more than 30,000 people and has been described by the Chechen authorities as the "largest and most beautiful" mosque in Europe. Chechen leader Ramzan Kadyrov, an ally of President Vladimir Putin, said the mosque -- located in Shali, a town of 54,000 just outside the regional capital Grozny -- was "unique in its design, and majestic in its size and beauty".


The Latest: Harris gets warm welcome at California meeting

The Latest: Harris gets warm welcome at California meetingCalifornia Sen. Kamala Harris is getting a rousing hometown welcome at the Democratic National Committee summer meeting in San Francisco. Harris is looking to California as a potentially key part of her path to the Democratic presidential nomination. With scores of supporters in the gallery Friday, Harris harkened back to her first political race for district attorney.


A man was training to get a gun permit. The instructor accidentally shot him, police say

A man was training to get a gun permit. The instructor accidentally shot him, police sayThe instructor, a Riverside County Sheriff's Department trainer, accidentally shot a student attending the class to get a concealed weapons permit.


A man with schizophrenia was found guilty of murdering a Saint Augustine's University student in 1979. 40 years later, a panel of judges decided he's innocent after all.

A man with schizophrenia was found guilty of murdering a Saint Augustine's University student in 1979. 40 years later, a panel of judges decided he's innocent after all.Blackmon's lawyers argued he was tricked by police and prosecutors into falsely confessing to a crime he didn't commit.


A floating nuclear plant in Russia features a gym, bar, and pool. An expert calls it 'Chernobyl on ice.'

A floating nuclear plant in Russia features a gym, bar, and pool. An expert calls it 'Chernobyl on ice.'Environmental activists worry about the perils of placing nuclear reactors at sea, where they could be vulnerable to climate-related disasters.


Metal detectorist finds £10,000 gold ring in garage 40 years after discarding it as worthless

Metal detectorist finds £10,000 gold ring in garage 40 years after discarding it as worthlessA metal detectorist who discarded a gold ring in his garage for 40 years after a museum told him it was worthless has discovered its real value is £10,000. Tom Clark, 81, dug up the buried treasure while scanning an area of farmland near Aylesbury, Buckinghamshire, in 1979, then put it inside a metal tin and forgot about it. But the retired leather craftsman came across the rare seal ring eight years ago while sorting through items from his mother's house after she passed away. He got the item valued and was astonished to discover that it was actually a 670-year-old medieval artefact dating back to 1350. It is due to be auctioned off in Derbyshire on Tuesday (Aug 27) and is expected to sell for between £8,500 and £10,000. The turn of events is similar to the plot of BBC sitcom Only Fools and Horses, when brothers Del and Rodney come across a watch in their garage which is then auctioned off for millions of pounds. Mr Clark said: "I had completely forgotten about it. At the time I'd only been metal detecting for 10 years and didn't realise the ring was anything special. It was all twisted and broken when I dug it up." He took the rare ring along with some others to a museum to have them valued at the time, but was told they were all fairly modern. "I put them all in a tin and left them in the garage at my mother's house," he said. "A few months ago, I was sorting through some stuff in my own garage that had come from my mother's house and there it was - the tin with the rings in it." Tom is auctioning off the ring, which is expected to make between £8,500 and £10,000 Credit: Hansons / SWNS/Hansons / SWNS Mr Clark, now a much more experienced collector, said he instantly knew it was a seal ring dating back to the 1300s and would have belonged to someone important given its decoration and quality. He added: "It's rare and elegant. I'd love to know who it belonged to." A Latin inscription on the ring translates as 'I hide the true message'. Mark Becher, Historica expert at auctioneer Hansons, said: "It's a fascinating piece of medieval jewellery and I'm delighted Tom rediscovered again after all these years."


Police Arrest 29 as Protesters Cause Damage: Hong Kong Update

Police Arrest 29 as Protesters Cause Damage: Hong Kong Update(Bloomberg) -- Hong Kong police fired tear gas and arrested 29 people on Saturday after protesters occupied roads, set up barricades and hurled projectiles in the 12th week of unrest in the Asian financial center.At least two more rallies were taking place on Sunday, including one organized by relatives of police officers, who have been criticized for using excessive force to quell protests. Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam held a meeting on Saturday with former officials and other prominent people to find a way out of the impasse that has rocked the former British colony.Demonstrators are looking to maintain momentum after large but peaceful protests last weekend temporarily broke a pattern of tear gas and police clashes. They formed a human chain across the city on Friday, while a plan to disrupt airport transportation services on Saturday wasn’t successful. Historic mass marches opposing legislation easing extraditions to China began peacefully in June, and have since widened into a broader movement against Beijing’s increasing grip.Key Developments:Police arrested more than two dozen protesters on SaturdayChief Executive Lam seeks to build a dialogue platform to address roots of discontentU.K. consulate staffer Simon Cheng was released by China on Saturday after more than two weeks of detentionHere’s the latest:Rain march (Sunday 2 p.m.)People took cover from the persistent rain and filled the stands and pitch of the Kwai Chung sports stadium, the starting point for Sunday’s rally. The march from the stadium was granted late-night approval after organizers appealed an earlier objection by authorities.“The rainy weather is good for the protesters but it’s bad for the police, who are wearing heavy gear. It also makes their tear gas ineffective,” said Gloria Mak, a 25-year-old assistant to a Japanese company.Train service suspended (Sunday 11.30 a.m.)MTR Corp., operator of Hong Kong’s rail network, suspended train service to stations near the planned Tsuen Wan march. The company said in a statement that the Kwai Fong, Tsuen Wan and Tai Wo Hau stations would be closed from 1.30 p.m. until further notice.On Saturday, MTR suspended service on parts of its Kwun Tong line because of protests in the area.Operations Director Adi Lau Tin-shing said the current situation was the company’s biggest challenge in its 40 years of operation and that the station closures were an unavoidable decision taken on the grounds of safety.Police condemn ‘radical’ behavior (Sunday, 3:02 a.m.)Police said “radical protesters” in Saturday’s clashes used electric saws to damage a number of smart lampposts, and hurled hard objects, bricks and petrol bombs at officers. They arrested 19 men and 10 women, aged between 17 and 52, for offenses including the possession of offensive weapons and assaulting police officers, the police said in a statement.Bricks and bamboo poles (Saturday 4:20 p.m.)Police fired tear gas to break up demonstrators blocking a road in the Kwung Tong area. Protesters were seen breaking bricks into smaller pieces and using bamboo poles to keep police from getting close to a barricade they erected. Elsewhere, video footage showed a so-called smart lamppost that was toppled and notes declaring “no totalitarian surveillance” were pasted on it.Protesters split up from the authorized march route and some regathered in the neighborhood of Wong Tai Sin, the scene of clashes earlier this month. Police fired tear gas and made arrests after the demonstrators blocked off roads and disrupted traffic.Lam seeks dialogue platform (Saturday 3:10 p.m.)About 30 people were invited to the meeting organized by Lam in Government House, including ex-transport chief Anthony Cheung and Cardinal John Tong, the former bishop of Hong Kong, RTHK reported. Lam said the meeting was not a “dialogue platform” but a gathering to share ideas on how to build dialogue.“I do not expect dialogue to easily resolve the deadlock, stop demonstrations, or to provide solutions to problems,” she said in a Facebook post. “But continuing to fight is not the way out.”Cathay issues warning (3.30 p.m.)Cathay Pacific Airways Ltd. said it will not tolerate employees supporting or taking part in illegal protests ahead of “planned activities” by the Hong Kong Confederation of Trade Unions on Aug. 26.The Airport Authority Hong Kong obtained a High Court order to extend an interim injunction granted on Aug. 13 banning protesters from unlawfully obstructing access to the airport. That injunction covers Cathay City, “which is the operational hub for our global operations and as such includes facilities that are absolutely critical to our flight operations,” Cathay said in Saturday’s statement.Operations at the city’s airport were disrupted earlier this month when protesters occupied the building.U.K. Consulate Staffer Freed (10:39 a.m.)Chinese police released a U.K. consulate staffer from Hong Kong after more than two weeks in detention. Simon Cheng was set free on Saturday after he was held for violating the Public Security Administration Punishment Law, police in the southern Chinese city of Shenzhen said in a post on the Weibo social media platform. He failed to return home to Hong Kong from an Aug. 8 meeting in Shenzhen.Upcoming ScheduleThe weekend concludes with Sunday protests in the Tsuen Wan and Kwai Chung areas, starting mid-afternoon. Relatives of police also plan a march to the official residence of Chief Executive Lam in support of local law enforcement.\--With assistance from Justin Chin, Sheryl Tian Tong Lee and Venus Feng.To contact the reporters on this story: Kari Lindberg in Hong Kong at klindberg13@bloomberg.net;Annie Lee in Hong Kong at olee42@bloomberg.net;Aaron Mc Nicholas in Hong Kong at amcnicholas2@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Shamim Adam at sadam2@bloomberg.net, ;Brendan Scott at bscott66@bloomberg.net, Stanley James, Andrew JanesFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


Revered as a saint by online extremists, how Christchurch shooter inspired copycat terrorists around the world

Revered as a saint by online extremists, how Christchurch shooter inspired copycat terrorists around the world“Brenton Tarrant was a catalyst for me personally. He showed me that it could be done. And that it needed to be done.”Those were the words written by John Timothy Earnest shortly before he stormed a synagogue in Poway, California, and opened fire on the Jewish congregation.


South Korea begins annual war games to defend against Japan

South Korea begins annual war games to defend against JapanSouth Korea Sunday began two days of war games to practise defending disputed islands off its east coast against an unlikely attack from Japan, further stoking tensions between the Asian neighbours. The annual drills come just days after Seoul terminated a military intelligence-sharing pact with Tokyo, with the countries at loggerheads over Japan's use of forced labour during World War II. The two-day exercise will involve warships and aircraft, the South Korean navy said in a text message without providing more detail.


Trump's economic anxiety comes to a boil

Trump's economic anxiety comes to a boilThe president directs U.S. businesses to pull out of China, but maintains that the "economy is doing really well."


Chinese embassy says the US is trying to suppress Huawei

Chinese embassy says the US is trying to suppress HuaweiAn embassy statement to The Associated Press said the arrest of Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou in Canada at the request of U.S. authorities is "of course different" from China's detentions of Canadians Michael Kovrig and Michael Spavor. "The Meng Wanzhou incident is not just a judicial case, but the U.S. using state power to work with its certain ally to suppress a private high-tech Chinese enterprise on unwarranted charges.


Fast-moving wildfire erupts in California, forcing thousands to evacuate

Fast-moving wildfire erupts in California, forcing thousands to evacuateMountain fire races across hundreds of acres in just hours as wildfire season looms large over the stateThis photo provided by Cal Fire shows an aerial view of the Mountain Fire on 22 August. Photograph: APA fast-moving wildfire that broke out on Thursday in northern California has forced the evacuation of nearly 4,000 residents, racing across at least 600 acres within just a few hours, officials say. The Mountain fire, which erupted on the outskirts of a national forest in northern California, has threatened 1,110 homes and structures. As of Friday morning the fire was 40% contained , according to Cal Fire.The cause of the fire is under investigation.Photos of the blaze posted on Twitter by the Shasta county sheriff’s office showed thick black and gray smoke billowing into the area over a highway near the Shasta-Trinity national forest.“Jones Valley and Bella Vista area residents! This situation is very fluid and rapidly changing, if you do not see your road listed but feel you are in danger YOU MAY EVACUATE to Shasta College Gymnasium,” the sheriff’s department said in a separate tweet.The Mountain fire is threatening thousands of homes and forcing evacuations. Photograph: APThe Shasta College campus was closed along with Highway 299 and about a dozen smaller roads. Residents of small communities in the path of the flames were told to evacuate or be prepared to flee on short notice.California was hit by some of the deadliest and most destructive wildfires in a century last year and state officials have warned this year’s fire season could be similarly intense.The Camp fire, which broke out in Butte county in November and overran the town of Paradise, killed 86 people and left thousands of others homeless. State fire investigators determined that the Camp fire was sparked by Pacific Gas & Electric Co transmission lines.The Mountain fire broke out on the same day that Bernie Sanders, the senator and Democratic presidential candidate, unveiled his $16.3tn climate change plan and toured Paradise, which he called a “wake-up call for our entire nation”.“Climate change is a major, major crisis for our country, and the entire world, and one of the manifestations of that crisis is what happened here,” Sanders said as he walked through a burned-out mobile home park in Paradise alongside people who lost their homes in last November’s deadly blaze.


Former police officer charged with murder for botched Houston raid

Former police officer charged with murder for botched Houston raidProsecutors are reviewing 14,000 criminal cases involving the drug squad that conducted the raid for evidence of improprieties, Harris County District Attorney Kim Ogg told a news conference. In January, then police officer Gerald Goines wrote in an affidavit to obtain a search warrant that an informant had bought heroin at the house, Ogg said. On Jan. 28, Goines and his Houston narcotics squad entered the house without knocking, as allowed under the warrant.


An innocent man spent months in jail after customs officials thought honey he brought back from Jamaica was liquid meth

An innocent man spent months in jail after customs officials thought honey he brought back from Jamaica was liquid methLeon Haughton told The Washington Post he was jailed for 82 days after customs officials in Baltimore alleged that the three jars of honey were meth.


Democratic presidential candidates have a new approach for tackling gun violence: Treat it as a public-health crisis

Democratic presidential candidates have a new approach for tackling gun violence: Treat it as a public-health crisisCandidates like Elizabeth Warren and Cory Booker want to draw on tactics used by community-based organizations to fight gun violence.


Cathay Pacific cabin crew union leader fired as Hong Kongers warn of spread of 'white terror'

Cathay Pacific cabin crew union leader fired as Hong Kongers warn of spread of 'white terror'Cathay Pacific fired a cabin crew union leader on Friday, the latest casualty in a fast-spreading “white terror” as mass protests in Hong Kong continue into their third month.  Rebecca Sy, head of the Cathay Dragon flight attendant’s association, said she lost her job of 17 years, without explanation,  after managers saw and confirmed her Facebook account,  which included messages in favour of the protests. “All the employees are being frightened, not just cabin crews, but even the management,” Ms Sy told reporters. “My colleagues are all terrified because of its white terror.” “White terror” is a term used to describe a slew of events that create a climate of fear particularly as companies and employees worry of serious repercussions for voicing their views. Her departure follows a surprise resignation last week by CEO Rupert Hogg, reported first by Chinese state media, underlining the political nature of the decision. Cathay has borne the brunt of Beijing’s anger as authorities look to punish companies with any link to the Hong Kong protests - a direct challenge to the power of the Communist Party. Rebecca Sy was dismissed from her position as flight attendant for Cathay Pacific's subsidiary Cathay Dragon Credit: ANTHONY WALLACE/AFP/Getty Images In the crackdown, companies and employees could face serious repercussions for voicing their views. Hong Kong subway operator MTR has also come under fire for arranging additional trains to allow protesters to travel home, accused of “colluding with rioters” in Chinese state media.  Beijing authorities have long put the squeeze on companies over political issues by encouraging its 1.4 billion citizens to snub various brands or by throwing up a number of regulatory roadblocks – a move that can have devastating consequences for even the biggest firms. Simon Cheng, 28, a British consular official in Hong Kong and permanent resident of the city has been detained for two weeks in mainland China for allegedly visiting prostitutes.  Under Chinese law, Mr Cheng should have been released today after a 15-day administrative period but at time of publication he was still in detention. Hong Kong police said on Friday that they did not know Mr Cheng's whereabouts.  Protests in Hong Kong first kicked off over an extradition proposal that would have exposed people to China’s murky legal and judicial system, where authorities have also in the past detained foreigners to express political displeasure. Two Canadians - Michael Kovrig, a former diplomat, and Michael Spavor, an entrepreneur - were detained in China last year during Beijing’s diplomatic dispute with Ottawa over its arrest of Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou. It is widely viewed that both men - who are still being held and have been charged with spying – are being used as political pawns. Hong Kong protests | Read more A number of multinationals operating in Hong Kong have sought to stress their political neutrality to avoid their businesses being targeted and to protect staff from arbitrary detention.  Earlier this week, the world’s “big four” accounting firms came under attack after an anonymous group claiming to be made up of their employees took out a full-page newspaper advertisement to express support for protests in Hong Kong and condemn the firms for remaining silent on the issue. Deloitte, Ernst & Young, KPMG and Pricewaterhouse Coopers all sought to distance themselves from the advertisement, saying it didn’t represent the companies’ views. But Chinese state media had already seized on the situation, calling for the firms to identify and sack the employees behind the ad. FinnAir has also issued a warning to staff to remember to “keep work and politics separate,” reported the South China Morning Post, over concerns that any link to the protests might lead to a customer backlash or flight cancellations in China, its second-largest market for long-haul travel.   “China is obviously putting pressure on companies to ensure that they all hold the same political views,” said Keenan Chuk, 30, a finance manager who attended a lunchtime rally or accountants in Hong Kong’s central business district Friday.  “I am concerned that I will be fired,” he said, adding that “we still have to fight for our rights.” Even universities have warned students against discussing politics and participating in rallies.  “In a modern society, education should be free from politics so as to alleviate the escalation of anxiety and avoid the divisive society caused by chaos,” according to a statement from the City University of Hong Kong issued earlier this month. A woman said she experienced at a police station during her detention in Hong Kong Credit: REUTERS/Thomas Peter Some banks are also now taking precautionary measures, purchasing full page ads in newspapers to affirm their support for the government. Edwin, 26, an accountant who declined to give his last name, said senior partners in his firm had invited junior employees to lunch that day in an attempt to dissuade people from attending Friday’s protest.  But he participated in the demonstration anyway, turning up again in the evening to join a human chain meant to evoke the Baltic Way, when two million lined up across three countries to protest Soviet rule in 1989.  “In the industry, we switch firms quite often,” he shrugged. Hong Kong police came under renewed pressure on Friday when officers were accused of conducting an unnecessary strip search on a female protester. The alleged victim appeared at a press conference dressed in all black with a black face mask, cap and sunglasses. Facing the cameras in front of a "MeToo" sign, she claimed she was arrested weeks ago at a protest against the now-abandoned extradition bill and was admitted to hospital for injuries she suffered that night. By her account, one officer patted her thighs with a pen, instructing her to open her legs wider after ordering her to take off all her clothes in a police cell. The police said their body search procedures had not changed during the recent outbreak of citywide protests.


Iceland Held Talks With U.S. Ambassador Over Pence Visit

Iceland Held Talks With U.S. Ambassador Over Pence Visit(Bloomberg) -- Iceland’ prime minister is open to a meeting with Vice President Mike Pence during his trip to the Nordic island, should the visit be extended.The option was discussed during a pre-scheduled meeting on Friday between Katrin Jakobsdottir and ambassador Jeffrey Gunter, a government spokesman told Bloomberg.Jakobsdottir, a left-of-center feminist and LGBT advocate, is due to attend a conference by Nordic trade union leaders in Sweden on Sept. 4. That’s the same day in which Pence is due to arrive.Jakobsdottir’s decision to not change her schedule to accommodate the vice president’s visit has been criticized at home.Olaf­ur Hardar­son, a professor of political science at the University of Iceland, told local media Morgunbladid it would be “unusual” for the prime minister not to greet the American vice president.According to her spokeswoman, a final decision on whether the meeting can take place has not yet been made.The White House said Pence planned to discuss trade opportunities, the Arctic and NATO efforts to counter Russian aggression in the region.The scheduling snafu is the latest episode in a series of exchanges involving Donald Trump and the Nordics.Pence’s visit would take place in the wake of a very public spat between the U.S. president and Denmark over its refusal to sell Greenland.Trump said Saturday he had held a “nice” conversation with Mette Frederiksen, with the exchange coming just days after labeling the Danish prime minister as “nasty.”In 2017, Sweden reacted forcibly to Trump’s portrayal of the Nordic nation as being in a state of chaos and overrun by crime after an influx of refugees.(Adds quote in fifth paragraph.)To contact the reporter on this story: Ragnhildur Sigurdardottir in Reykjavik at rsigurdardot@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Jonas Bergman at jbergman@bloomberg.net, Nick Rigillo, Andrew DavisFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


Fear grips Bangladesh camp as 2 Rohingya refugees killed

Fear grips Bangladesh camp as 2 Rohingya refugees killedBangladesh police said they had shot dead two Rohingya refugees during a gunfight in a refugee camp on Saturday after the pair were accused of killing a ruling party official. Nearly a million Rohingya live in squalid camps in southeast Bangladesh, 740,000 of whom fled a 2017 military offensive against the Muslim minority in Myanmar. The incident comes two days after a second failed attempt to repatriate the refugees, which saw not a single Rohingya turn up to return across the border to conflict-scarred Rakhine state.


Dow, stocks dive off Trump's latest comments on US-China trade war

Dow, stocks dive off Trump's latest comments on US-China trade warStocks fell sharply on Wall Street Friday after President Donald Trump called on U.S. companies to consider alternatives to doing business in China


All the Best Le Creuset Deals During Williams Sonoma Warehouse Sale

All the Best Le Creuset Deals During Williams Sonoma Warehouse Sale


Russian doctor has trace of radiation after explosion

Russian doctor has trace of radiation after explosionMore than 100 Russian medical workers who helped treat victims of a recent mysterious explosion at a military testing range have undergone checks and one man has been found with a trace of radiation, officials said Friday. It was followed by a brief rise in radiation levels in nearby Severodvinsk, but the authorities insisted it didn't pose any danger. The Arkhangelsk regional administration said Friday that 110 medical workers have undergone checks that one man was found with a low amount of radioactive cesium-137 in his muscle tissue.


Serial killer linked to dozens of U.S. murders pleads guilty to two more

Serial killer linked to dozens of U.S. murders pleads guilty to two moreThe date of the Jane Doe killing is unknown but is believed to have occurred sometime between 1980 and 1999. The 79-year-old defendant appeared in Cincinnati's Hamilton County Court via Skype from California State Prison in Los Angeles County and sat with his hands folded in a wheelchair, responding "Yes, ma'am" when Judge Melba Marsh asked if he waived his right to a trial by jury. "He said he specifically looked for people who would not be missed," Chief Assistant Prosecutor Mark Piepmeier told the judge.


Watch Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez play with a penguin because it's pure, uncut goodness

Watch Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez play with a penguin because it's pure, uncut goodnessThe world can be a cruel, unforgiving place. But, somehow, watching Congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez play and dance with a penguin makes everything just a little bit better. Even if only for a moment. On Saturday, Ocasio-Cortez tweeted a video of herself and her flipper-sporting friend engaged in a round of what looks to be playful dance. Seriously, it's adorable. The penguin is all the way in."A new day, a new friend," Ocasio-Cortez wrote of her encounter. Importantly, Ocasio-Cortez is not roaming around Antarctica. Rather, she appears to be in a science museum or zoo. The display next to the penguin enclosure includes facts about African Penguins -- which have a home in the Maryland Zoo, among other places.SEE ALSO: Australian strangers engage in weird, elaborate feud over their coffeeshop fandom"The Maryland Zoo maintains the largest colony of African penguins in North America," the Zoo helpfully notes on its website for all you penguin heads out there.Regardless of the specific location, we're totally in. Now excuse us while we play this video on repeat to drown out the world's sorrows.  WATCH: A prehistoric human-sized penguin has been discovered in New Zealand


A youth sports organization is raffling off a semi-automatic weapon to help its cheerleading and football teams

A youth sports organization is raffling off a semi-automatic weapon to help its cheerleading and football teamsAs a result of the controversy, the president of the organization said he is considering doing away with the rifle raffle for future fundraisers.


Cathay flight attendant says fired over Facebook posts on HK protests

Cathay flight attendant says fired over Facebook posts on HK protestsA flight attendant on Friday accused Cathay Pacific of summarily firing her over Facebook posts linked to Hong Kong's political crisis, adding to concerns about a China-driven witch-hunt to root out pro-democracy supporters at major firms. The Hong Kong-based airline has been accused of bowing to political and commercial pressure from Beijing by sacking employees in recent weeks for their public support for the massive anti-government movement roiling Hong Kong. Earlier this month, China's aviation authority ordered Cathay Pacific to stop pro-democracy supporters among its 27,000 staff from working on flights to -- or over -- China, after a general strike drew out some of its workers.


Man Throws Brick at Woman's Head in One of Several Random NYC Attacks

Man Throws Brick at Woman's Head in One of Several Random NYC AttacksA man has attacked at least four people in random Manhattan attacks this August, police said.


Qantas to test 'ultra long-haul' Sydney to NY, London flights

Qantas to test 'ultra long-haul' Sydney to NY, London flightsQantas on Thursday said it will run "ultra long-haul" test flights in the coming months from New York and London to Sydney in order to assess the health of pilots and passengers, as it eyes commercial services on the marathon routes. Qantas last year introduced the first direct service from the western Australian city of Perth to London, with the 17-hour journey one of the longest passenger flights in the world. "Flying non-stop from the East Coast of Australia to London and New York is truly the final frontier in aviation, so we're determined to do all the groundwork to get this right," Qantas CEO Alan Joyce said in a statement.


Pompeo says Huawei CEO is not a bargaining chip in Trump-China trade war

Pompeo says Huawei CEO is not a bargaining chip in Trump-China trade warMike Pompeo has rejected claims that detained Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou is being used for leverage in the US-China trade war. Speaking with his Canadian counterpart, Chrystia Freeland, in Ottawa on Thursday, the US secretary of state appeared to rule out dropping the extradition request for Ms Meng to ease tensions with Beijing, insisting it is a legal matter. In December, US president Donald Trump implied he might intervene in the case to help secure a trade deal with China. “Whatever’s good for this country, I would do,” he said at the time. The US alleges Ms Meng – the Chinese technology company’s chief financial officer and the daughter of its chief executive – helped  Huawei circumvent sanctions on Iran. According to Vancouver court documents released this week, she told a Canadian border official that the company has an office in Iran. The US has charged Ms Meng, 47, with bank fraud, wire fraud and conspiracy to commit both. She is currently on bail living under house arrest in one of her Vancouver mansions while her lawyers fight her extradition to the US. Asked on Thursday if she is a “bargaining chip” in US-China trade talks, Mr Pompeo replied simply: “No.” Since Ms Meng’s arrest in Vancouver airport on a US arrest warrant in December, ties between Ottawa and Beijing have fallen to a historically low ebb. Two Canadians, businessman Michael Svapor and former diplomat Michael Kovrig, were arrested and charged with espionage shortly afterwards in what is widely viewed as a reprisal by Beijing. “Our team is focussed on helping those two Canadians be released,” Mr Pompeo said later ahead of a meeting with Canadian prime minister Justin Trudeau. Mr Trump spoke directly to Chinese president Xi Jinping about their “arbitrary detention” in June, he told journalists. Mr Pompeo, 55, also slapped down a question comparing their confinement with that of Ms Meng, accusing the journalist of taking “the Chinese line”. Mr Pompeo was visiting Canada ahead of the G7 meeting in France, where relations with China will be discussed. On Friday, Beijing escalated the trade dispute, announcing fresh tariffs on US imports worth $75 billion (£61 billion).


Chinese buyers pull back from U.S. housing market, hurting home sales

Chinese buyers pull back from U.S. housing market, hurting home salesChinese investors are buying fewer U.S. homes because of money controls in China. That's lowering prices and giving U.S. buyers a better chance to buy


Rep. Steve King wants to make abortion point in 'softer way'

Rep. Steve King wants to make abortion point in 'softer way'Backed by supporters at a news conference in Des Moines, the Iowa Republican affirmed his belief that abortion should be outlawed with no exceptions for rape or incest. King faced criticism for his comment Aug. 14 that questioned whether there would be "any population of the world left" if not for births due to rape or incest. The remarks were condemned by numerous groups and individuals, including Republican and Democratic candidates seeking to oust King, Democratic presidential candidates as well as the Iowa Republican Party and Rep. Liz Cheney, the No. 3 Republican in House leadership.


Sitting Pretty

Sitting Pretty


Released from death row, then returned — forced to prove race discrimination a second time

Released from death row, then returned — forced to prove race discrimination a second timeCases before N.C. Supreme Court show link between slavery, Jim Crow and modern death penalty is as connected as 'ropes of the lynch-man's noose'


Israel hits Iranian force in Syria to stop 'killer drones': military

Israel hits Iranian force in Syria to stop 'killer drones': militaryJERUSALEM/DAMASCUS (Reuters) - Israeli aircraft on Saturday struck Iranian forces near Damascus that had been planning to launch "killer drones" at targets in Israel, an Israeli military spokesman said. "The strike targeted Iranian Quds Force operatives and Shiite militias which were preparing to advance attack plans targeting sites in Israel from within Syria over the last number of days," the military said in a statement. The elite Quds Force is the overseas arm of Iran's Revolutionary Guards (IRGC).


Britain sends another warship to Gulf

Britain sends another warship to GulfA third British warship is heading to the Gulf, the Royal Navy announced Saturday, amid heightened tensions in the region. Britain has already sent the HMS Kent to cover for frigate HMS Montrose while it undergoes maintenance in nearby Bahrain, and is now redirecting the Type 45 destroyer HMS Defender from its mission to the Pacific. Britain outraged Iran by seizing one of its tankers -- the Grace 1 -- on July 4 on suspicion it was carrying oil to Syria in violation of EU sanctions.


Kavanaugh’s High-School Classmate Sues HuffPost for Defamation

Kavanaugh’s High-School Classmate Sues HuffPost for DefamationA former high-school classmate of Supreme Court justice Brett Kavanaugh has filed suit against HuffPost over a “fabricated” report intended to detail the culture of debauchery at Georgetown Preparatory School during Kavanaugh's time there.HuffPost reporter Ashley Feinberg, now at Slate, published a report at the height of the Kavanaugh confirmation controversy entitled “Former Student: Brett Kavanaugh's Prep School Party Scene Was a ‘Free-For-All',” which purported to expose the degenerate culture that predominated at Georgetown Prep when Kavanaugh was a student. That hard-partying ethos supposedly culminated in the 1984 overdose death of David Kennedy, Robert F. Kennedy's son, in a Palm Beach hotel.Feinberg, citing one anonymous Georgetown Prep alumnus, wrote that “two students — David's brother Doug, and his friend Derrick Evans — had helped score the coke” that ultimately killed David. Evans, an African American professor and community activist, filed suit on Wednesday alleging that Feinberg failed to contact him and fabricated his role in David's death in her “zeal to create a sensational article about Judge Brett Kavanaugh’s years at [Georgetown Prep] and thereby drive traffic to [HuffPost's] website.”“Indeed, if Ms. Feinberg or her HuffPost editors had done even the most basic research of publicly available sources, she and they would have known, if they did not already know, that Mr. Evans actively assisted law enforcement in identifying and prosecuting the individuals who actually sold the illegal narcotics,” the lawsuit reads.HuffPost initially corrected the article after Doug Kennedy's employer, Fox News, sent a letter to the outlet rebutting its allegations.“This article previously stated incorrectly that Doug Kennedy was involved in helping his brother to purchase drugs in 1984. Kennedy was only sharing a room with Derrick Evans, who helped David purchase the drugs, according to an affidavit obtained by the New York Times. We regret the error,” reads a correction appended to the article just one day after it was published.While the correction exonerated Doug Kennedy it also further defamed Evans, according to the lawsuit.“The September 21 correction was another complete fabrication published by HuffPost with actual knowledge that both it and the original publication were false or in reckless disregard of the truth, again without ever attempting to contact Mr. Evans for comment,” the lawsuit reads. “As HuffPost knew, there was NO affidavit reflecting that Mr. Evans ever helped anyone purchase illegal drugs. Defendants had no such affidavit in their possession, and they could not have had such an affidavit in their possession.”The original article has been significantly altered since its publication and, as of this writing, no longer contains any reference to David's death.The case, Evans v. Huffington Post.com Inc., is now pending in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Mississippi.


Ghost Particles Could Explain Just About Everything in the Universe

Ghost Particles Could Explain Just About Everything in the UniverseYou might also know them by their other name: neutrinos.


U.S. ‘Starting to Lose China,’ Says Global Times’ Hu Xijin

U.S. ‘Starting to Lose China,’ Says Global Times’ Hu Xijin(Bloomberg) -- Terms of Trade is a daily newsletter that untangles a world embroiled in trade wars. Sign up here. China will follow through with retaliatory measures announced Friday and fight the trade war to the end, in the face of the U.S.’s failure to keep its promises, the state-run People’s Daily wrote in a Saturday editorial.Later, the influential Chinese journalist Hu Xijin said on Twitter that the U.S. is “starting to lose China.”On Friday, Beijing unveiled plans to impose additional tariffs on $75 billion of U.S. goods, including soybeans, automobiles and oil. The nation will “walk the talk” in implementing its third round of retaliatory measures, according to the newspaper.China has been forced into countermeasures by U.S. unilateralism and trade protectionism, the paper said, adding that Washington has been erratic in imposing tariffs on China and has shown “amnesia” in honoring its promises.Trade tensions between the two nations escalated on Friday after President Donald Trump said he’s raising tariffs on Chinese imports in response to the measures announced by Beijing. Anticipation of Trump’s actions, which were foreshadowed by a series of angry tweets, sent global stock markets reeling.Tariffs RisingExisting U.S. duties on $250 billion of Chinese imports will rise to 30% from 25% on Oct. 1, while a planned 10% tariff on a further $300 billion in Chinese goods will jump to 15%, starting with the first tranche on Sept. 1, Trump said in tweets Friday.China’s Ministry of Commerce issued a strongly-worded statement on Saturday saying the U.S. was involved in “unilateral and bullying trade protectionism” that puts the normal international trade order at risk.Trump, for his part, suggested in an overnight tweet that he was looking at the “Emergency Economic Powers Act of 1977” in ordering U.S. companies to quit China. “Case close!” Trump concluded.That measure -- technically, the International Emergency Economic Powers Act -- gives U.S. presidents wide latitude to regulate international commerce at times of national emergencies. It’s unclear how Trump could use the law in the current situation to have U.S. companies bend to his will.Hu, editor-in-chief of the Global Times, a tabloid newspaper controlled by China’s ruling Communist Party, accurately predicted the timing of China’s retaliatory tariffs on Friday.On Saturday, he said China “has ‘lost’ the U.S. already,” citing high tariffs, the ban on telecoms company Huawei Technologies Co. Ltd., political hostility, and actions toward Hong Kong and Taiwan. “We’re facing a completely different United States. We have nothing more to lose, while the US is just starting to lose China,” Xu said.While the Global Times doesn’t necessarily reflect the view of Chinese leaders, Hu has said the paper voices opinions that official sources can’t.Hu earlier tweeted that if U.S. automakers heed Trump’s Friday call for “major American companies” to desert China, they would be giving up the market to Japanese and German brands. “Go back to the US, let each American family have 20 cars,” he tweeted, followed by a smiley face.U.S. importers and retailers decried the latest moves by Trump.“These escalating tariffs are the worst economic mistake since the Smoot-Hawley Tariff Act of 1930 -- a decision that catapulted our country into the Great Depression,” Gary Shapiro, president and CEO of the Consumer Technology Association, said in a statement.(Updates with China’s Commerce Ministry, CTA comment from seventh paragraph.)To contact Bloomberg News staff for this story: Evelyn Yu in Shanghai at yyu263@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Sam Mamudi at smamudi@bloomberg.net, Ros Krasny, Steve GeimannFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


Man flees police on mobility scooter in low-speed chase as onlookers cheer 'Go old man!'

Man flees police on mobility scooter in low-speed chase as onlookers cheer 'Go old man!'The video shows Charlie Durham, a double amputee, speeding on his scooter as a police officer attempted to pull him over in New Zealand.


Lawsuit: Ex-Citadel staffer drugged, sexually abused cadet

Lawsuit: Ex-Citadel staffer drugged, sexually abused cadetA student at The Citadel sued an ex-instructor who he says agreed not to discipline him in exchange for sex. Former Citadel Lt. Col. Kenneth Boes was charged last year with sexually assaulting the cadet, but prosecutors dropped those charges for reasons that aren't explained in online court records. Boes' lawyer on Friday described the cadet as a false victim and violent young man who wants to make a quick buck at the expense of a man with an impeccable reputation.


Woman finds venomous spider in her ear after mistaking it for water

Woman finds venomous spider in her ear after mistaking it for waterThe discomfort in Susie Torres’ left ear felt like the water that can get stuck there after swimming. She heard swooshing when she woke up on Tuesday and assumed it had been caused by an allergy shot.Torres, of Kansas City, Missouri, discovered she was wrong when doctors extracted a dime-sized, venomous brown recluse spider, Fox 4 News reported.


Man Who Stopped to 'Assist' Woman Having Car Trouble Accused of Sexually Assaulting Her

Man Who Stopped to 'Assist' Woman Having Car Trouble Accused of Sexually Assaulting HerPolice in Monroe County, Indiana are working to identify a suspect in a rape case.


UPDATE 3-Saudi-led coalition says downs Houthi drone fired at airbase

UPDATE 3-Saudi-led coalition says downs Houthi drone fired at airbaseA Saudi-led military coalition fighting the Houthis in Yemen said it downed a drone on Sunday that the Iran-aligned group has said they launched in the direction of a Saudi airbase. "The coalition forces intercepted and downed a drone launched from the city of Sanaa in the direction of Khamis Muchait's residential neighbourhoods," coalition spokesman Colonel Turki al-Malki told the official Saudi Press Agency. A Houthi military spokesman cited by the group's Al-Masirah TV earlier said the group had launched drones targeting the control towers of the Abha airport and the Khamis Mushait airbase, both in the southwest of the kingdom.